Cases reported "Laryngostenosis"

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1/165. Extended laryngofissure in the management of subglottic stenosis in the young child: a preliminary report.

    The child with subglottic stenosis and a tracheotomy is a management problem. To date, a consistent method for successful and expeditious correction of the primary lesion to permit decannulation has eluded clinicians. The child is tracheotomized and thus frequently hospitalized for a lengthy period. Personal development and family relationships are adversely affected and the mortality rate during this period of cannulation is significant. During the past eighteen months in an attempt to achieve earlier decannulation, three children with subglottic stenosis have undergone a surgical procedure in which division of the anterior and posterior aspects of the cricoid ring are the key surgical maneuvers.
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ranking = 1
keywords = stenosis
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2/165. epidermolysis bullosa associated with laryngeal stenosis.

    A boy with epidermolysis bullosa developed progressive laryngeal obstruction after age six months, with tracheotomy necessary at age three years. By eight years, the larynx was completely occluded by web and scar. Stenosis recurred repeatedly over the next seven years, three to six months after each corrective procedure, but laryngeal patency has been better-maintained since age 15. Laryngeal stenosis, presumably secondary to epithelial detachment, although a rare complication of epidermolysis bullosa, can be serious and life-threatening.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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3/165. Sequestrated tubular duplication of the colon with congenital subglottic stenosis.

    A 6-year-old male presenting with features of intestinal obstruction because of a sequestrated tubular duplication of the colon is reported. The patient also had congenital subglottic stenosis, an association not yet reported with any type of gut duplication. Complete excision of the duplication was done with preservation of vascularity of the adjacent normal colon. The relevant literature is reviewed briefly.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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4/165. Supracricoid partial laryngectomy for severe laryngeal stenosis.

    We report 2 cases in which supracricoid partial laryngectomy and cricohyoidoepiglottopexy were used to restore the airway in cases of severe associated glottic and supraglottic laryngeal stenosis.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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5/165. Short limbed skeletal dysplasia associated with combined immunodeficiency and congenital subglottic stenosis: a new constellation of features.

    A newborn male is described with an association of short limbed dwarfism with hip dislocation, combined immunodeficiency characterized by absent B cells and CD4 lymphopaenia and congenital subglottic stenosis. This constellation of abnormalities is distinct from other described skeletal dysplasias associated with immunodeficiency such as ADA deficiency and cartilage hair hypoplasia.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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6/165. Unusual cause of subglottic stenosis in an adult.

    Subglottic foreign bodies presenting, as chronic subglottic stenosis is extremely rare in adults. A high index of suspicion and a careful history is of paramount importance in the diagnosis of a subglottic foreign body. Laser should not be used to excise granulation tissue to expose the foreign body because of the danger and potential of a fire particularly when the nature of the foreign body is not known. Rigid bronchoscopes are more beneficial than flexible ones in the removal of foreign bodies especially in long-standing cases.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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7/165. Subglottic stenosis associated with transesophageal echocardiography.

    Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is used extensively to assess cardiac function and anatomical relationships in both adults and children. Although considered a noninvasive procedure, TEE in infants and small children may result in airway complications. A patient who developed subglottic stenosis after the use of TEE during a cardiac procedure is reported.
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ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = stenosis
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8/165. Evaluating laryngotracheal stenosis in a canine model with virtual bronchoscopy.

    We performed a prospective masked animal study to determine whether virtual bronchoscopy, a noninvasive computed tomography technique, can accurately measure upper airway stenosis. Virtual bronchoscopy creates a 3-dimensional endoscopic image from spiral computed tomography data. Laryngotracheal stenosis was endoscopically induced in 18 dogs. The excised larynges were examined by endoscopy, virtual bronchoscopy, and macrodissection. Measurements were made of the anteroposterior (A-P) diameter, the left-right (L-R) diameter, the full length of stenosis in the sagittal plane, and the length of the tightest stenotic segment. Each measurement method was performed independently. All investigators were unaware of measurements made by others. The measurements obtained through virtual bronchoscopy and actual endoscopy were compared to those made at dissection by interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). endoscopy was better than virtual bronchoscopy in measuring the A-P diameter (ICC = .79, p < .0001; ICC = .42, p = .01). Both were equally effective in measuring the L-R diameter (ICC = .53, p = .0062; ICC = .52, p = .0064). The endoscopes could not assess the full length of the stenosis, whereas virtual bronchoscopy measured it fairly accurately (ICC = .72, p = .0001). Virtual bronchoscopy relatively accurately measured the length of the tightest stenotic segment (ICC = .68, p = .0002), whereas endoscopy produced measurements in only 11 of 18 larynges, and the measurements were less accurate (ICC = .45, p = .0068). Virtual bronchoscopy can provide good measurements of stenotic lesions in the airway. It is more accurate than actual endoscopy in determining the length of stenosis. It may therefore be useful as an adjunct imaging method in preoperative planning for reconstructive surgery.
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ranking = 22.29335181652
keywords = tracheal stenosis, stenosis
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9/165. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the larynx.

    A pediatric case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis leading to severe and recurrent subglottic stenosis, ultimately necessitating partial cricotracheal resection, is presented and the literature on this very rare disorder is briefly reviewed.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = stenosis
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10/165. Laryngotracheal reconstruction and the hidden airway lesion.

    OBJECTIVE: Single-stage laryngotracheal reconstruction (SSLTR) is an increasingly common technique to achieve decannulation of patients with laryngotracheal stenosis. In a proportion of cases airway distress on extubation may be attributed to a dynamic second airway lesion not diagnosed before surgery. Our aim is to describe our recent experience with these frustrating patients. methods: Between July 1997 and July 1999 we prospectively followed patients who underwent SSLTR and experienced difficulty after extubation owing to an unsuspected second airway lesion. RESULTS: During this 24-month period we performed 80 SSLTRs. In six surgeries performed on five patients, a second airway lesion complicated extubation. In five patients the second lesion was not diagnosed before surgery because there was significant airway stenosis and tracheotomy. The sixth patient was transferred to our care intubated. In all cases the airway surgery for the dominant lesion was technically successful, but revealed a second dynamic lesion. There were three cases of tracheomalacia, two cases of laryngomalacia, and one case of arytenoid prolapse. All patients required intervention. tracheotomy was required in four patients. CONCLUSIONS: Failure to achieve extubation after SSLTR may be caused by a dynamic second airway lesion that was previously disguised by a more dominant airway lesion. Surgical repair of the dominant lesion will allow manifestation of the dynamic lesion due to the Bernoulli effect. The combination of a tracheotomy and a dominant airway lesion limits airflow and potentially disguises the situation.
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ranking = 4.4920036966374
keywords = tracheal stenosis, stenosis
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