Cases reported "Lead Poisoning"

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1/41. lead poisoning: a disease for the next millennium.

    The decline in the prevalence of childhood lead poisoning is a public health success story. However, nearly a million preschool-aged children in the united states alone have elevated BPb levels. Toxicity correlates with BPb concentrations and progresses from biochemical and subclinical abnormalities at levels around 10 micrograms/dL to coma and death at levels over 100 micrograms/dL. Treatment consists of the elimination of exposure, interruption of the pathway into the child, modification of diet to ensure adequate essential metal intake (calcium, iron), and on occasion, chelation therapy. The identification of children with the most lead poisoning depends on screening for exposure (questionnaire) or evidence of increased absorption (BPb test). Follow-up is crucial to maximize the effectiveness of any intervention.
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keywords = metal
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2/41. lead poisoning. A comprehensive review and report of a case.

    Lead, a ubiquitous heavy metal which has realized increased use, can cause poisoning by environmental contamination in either its organic or its inorganic form. lead poisoning can be either acute or chronic, with the latter being the more common. The clinical signs and symptoms of lead poisoning are nonspecific, resulting in a difficult diagnostic problem, especially when it is not industrially related. On occasions, the dentist or oral surgeon may be the first to see an afflicted patient because of oral manifestations.
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keywords = heavy metal, metal
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3/41. Heavy metal poisoning in glass worker characterised by severe.

    The paper presents the clinical description of the masticatory organ and biochemical assessment of dental tissue in a patient employed in a glassworks for 20 years. During 12 years the patient has suffered baldness ("alopecia areata") and atypical extensive and non-healing cutaneous lesions. Dental examination revealed changes typical of chronic poisoning by cadmium and bismuth compounds.
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keywords = metal
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4/41. Acute elevation of blood lead levels within hours of ingestion of large quantities of lead shot.

    BACKGROUND: Ingestion of elemental lead foreign bodies is felt to have a low risk of clinically significant lead absorption unless gastrointestinal pathology and/or prolonged transit time are present. We present a case of ingestion of a large quantity of small diameter lead shot accompanied by rapid elevation of blood lead levels. CASE REPORT: A 5 1/2-year-old previously healthy girl was found eating the pellets from an ankle weight. She vomited and complained of abdominal pain. In the emergency department, she had no complaints and normal vital signs. An abdominal X-ray showed thousands of small, round, metallic density objects in the stomach. Her white blood cell count was 14,700/mm3, and the hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, free erythrocyte protoporphyrin, zinc protoporphyrin, biochemistry panel 21, and urinalysis were normal. She had no prior lead level for comparison. Whole-bowel irrigation was begun and she passed over 11 stools with pellets as well as other foreign bodies (erasers, bead, etc.) in the first 24 hours. Pellets were still seen on X-ray the following day so she received a high-fiber diet and bisacodyl tablets 10 mg/d. On hospital day 2, her admission blood lead (drawn 13 hours after ingestion) was reported as 57 microg/dL (2.7 microm/L) and chelation was begun with oral 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid 10 mg/kg 3x/d for 5 days, then 2x/d for 14 days. Her peak measured lead level was 79 microg/dL approximately 36 hours after ingestion. She excreted 2,273 microg lead in the urine during her first 24 hours of chelation. Her blood lead dropped to 14.3 microg/dL by the end of chelation. She did not develop any apparent signs of lead poisoning. CONCLUSION: Acute elevations of blood lead concentrations may occur rapidly after ingestion of multiple small elemental lead objects.
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5/41. Occupational and adult lead exposure in wisconsin.

    Lead is a versatile metal with many industrial applications. It is among the oldest recognized occupational health hazards. lead poisoning has been a reportable disease in wisconsin since 1911. Although reportable, it was not until wisconsin established an Occupational and environmental health epidemiology program in 1979 that modern reporting levels were adopted, physician and laboratory reporting promoted and publicized, and elevated blood lead report tracking initiated. With the federal funding from the National Institute of Occupational safety and Health (NIOSH), a comprehensive adult blood lead surveillance program was created in 1987. Eleven years of surveillance trend data reveal a wisconsin success story. Most wisconsin industries have made substantial strides toward reducing occupational lead exposure. The improvement is reflected in the reduced number of elevated blood lead levels in wisconsin's adult blood lead surveillance data. However, wisconsin must remain vigilant as new and re-emerging lead exposures continue to be identified through adult blood lead surveillance. wisconsin will also need to continue with its occupational lead exposure reduction efforts if it is to achieve the Federal Healthy People 2010 goals and objectives to have no adult blood lead level greater than 25 micrograms/dL.
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6/41. lead poisoning from homemade wine: a case study.

    A 66-year-old man suffered the symptoms of severe lead poisoning for 2 years before diagnosis. The man had a blood lead level (PbB) on admission to hospital of 98 microg/dL. A detailed investigation revealed that the poisoning occurred as a result of drinking a homemade red wine, for which analyses showed a lead concentration up to 14 mg/L--70 times the Australian maximum limit for lead in wine. The source of the lead was a highly corroded enamel bathtub in which grape crushings and juice were stored for a week prior to bottling. The corrosion of the enamel surface of the bathtub had resulted in pitted patches up to 1 mm in depth along the side of the bathtub. Powdering of the tub surface was evident below a level where wine had been in contact with the sides of the tub. The homemade wine had a pH of 3.8, which would have greatly contributed to the solubilization of metals from the glaze. We conducted a test in which commercial red wine of similar pH and containing < 0.2 mg/L lead was placed in this tub for 7 days. Subsequent testing revealed a lead level of 310 mg/L. This high lead concentration is consistent with the surface area of enamel on the bathtub being in contact with a small liquid volume as in the case of the leaching test using commercial red wine. This case study highlights the importance of the use of food-grade materials for the preparation and storage of homemade beverages or food.
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7/41. Childhood lead poisoning from paint chips: a continuing problem.

    Although lead poisoning (plumbism) has been recognized for centuries, lead exposures still occur frequently today because of its varied uses and persistence in the environment. Despite the awareness of the adverse effects of lead on adults, childhood plumbism was first reported only about a century ago. Young children are one of the most vulnerable groups to the adverse effects of lead because of their rapidly developing central nervous systems. Federal regulations in the 1970s have been successfully implemented to decrease the amount of environmental lead by decreasing the content of lead in gasoline and indoor paint. However, almost 30 years after these laws were passed, inner-city housing with leaded paint still exists. We describe three children living in new york city who developed plumbism from the ingestion of leaded paint chips.
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ranking = 0.014848604413354
keywords = nervous system
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8/41. lead poisoning from ingestion of a toy necklace--oregon, 2003.

    Although ingestion of dust from lead-based paint is the most common source of lead exposure among children in the united states, lead also can be present in unsuspected objects. Ingestion of these objects can result in elevated blood lead levels (BLLs). This report describes an investigation by the Deschutes County Health Department and the oregon Department of Human Services of lead poisoning in a boy who swallowed a medallion pendant from a necklace sold in a toy vending machine. The investigation resulted in a nationwide recall in September 2003 of the implicated toy necklace. Clinicians and caregivers should consider lead poisoning in any child who ingests, or puts in his mouth, a metal object. Cases of lead poisoning should be reported immediately to public health authorities to prevent other children from being exposed to the same sources of lead.
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9/41. lead poisoning associated with ayurvedic medications--five states, 2000-2003.

    Although approximately 95% of lead poisoning among U.S. adults results from occupational exposure, lead poisoning also can occur from use of traditional or folk remedies. Ayurveda is a traditional form of medicine practiced in india and other South Asian countries. Ayurvedic medications can contain herbs, minerals, metals, or animal products and are made in standardized and nonstandardized formulations. During 2000-2003, a total of 12 cases of lead poisoning among adults in five states associated with ayurvedic medications or remedies were reported to CDC. This report summarizes these 12 cases. Culturally appropriate educational efforts are needed to inform persons in populations using traditional or folk medications of the potential health risks posed by these remedies.
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10/41. Childhood lead poisoning from commercially manufactured French ceramic dinnerware--new york city, 2003.

    lead poisoning adversely affects children worldwide. During 1999-2000, an estimated 434,000 children aged 1-5 years in the united states had elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) >/=10 microg/dL. Glazes found on ceramics, earthenware, bone china, and porcelain often contain lead and are a potential source of lead exposure. Children are especially vulnerable to the neurotoxic effects of lead. Exposures to lead in early childhood can have adverse effects on the developing nervous system, resulting in decreased intelligence and changes in behavior. In addition, certain behaviors (e.g., thumb sucking) place children at greater risk for exposure to lead. In 2003, the new york city Department of Health and Mental hygiene's lead poisoning Prevention Program (LPPP), and the Mount Sinai Pediatric environmental health Specialty Unit (PEHSU) investigated a case of lead poisoning in a boy aged 20 months. This report summarizes that case investigation, which identified ceramic dinnerware imported from france as the source of lead exposure. This case underscores the susceptibility of children to a toxic exposure associated with 1) the high proportion of time spent in the home and 2) dietary habits that promote exposure to lead leached from ceramic ware.
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