Cases reported "Leg Dermatoses"

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1/4. Congenital neonatal herpes simplex virus infection.

    Intrauterine-acquired neonatal herpes simplex virus infection is a severe, often life-threatening infection that has a wide spectrum of clinical presentations. We describe a 31-week-gestation male who had a rarely reported epidermolysis bullosa-like clinical presentation. He acquired herpes simplex virus type II in utero secondary to a primary maternal infection that occurred on the knee. A review of the infection, the need for early therapy, and the prognosis are presented.
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ranking = 1
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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2/4. tinea corporis bullosa.

    The paper reports a case of tinea corporis bullosa in a 63-year-old woman. Near the classical annular lesions on the anterior surface of the left leg, the patient presented frank bullous lesions. Serous fluid from the bulla yielded microsporum canis, the first report of the association of this fungus with bullous lesions in tinea corporis. The patient was investigated with routine examinations and immunological studies which showed an intense inflammatory process much greater than in usual cases of tinea corporis.
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ranking = 0.36373978853116
keywords = bullosa
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3/4. A case of pretibial dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa: decreased expression of the non-helical domain of type VII collagen molecule.

    A 27-year-old man with an ataxic gait due to infantile cerebral paralysis exhibited recurrent blistering caused by mechanical stimuli on the pretibial area of both legs from the age of 20. His parents were not consanguineous, and he had no relatives who suffered from blistering. The histology showed a subepidermal bulla due to dermolytic epidermal-dermal separation. The anchoring fibrils were sparse and rudimentary in the predilection area. An LH 7:2 monoclonal antibody against the non-helical domain of the type VII collagen molecule stained the basement membrane zone of the patient's skin at a weaker intensity than the staining of normal human skin, but at a distinctively stronger intensity than the staining of skin from a patient with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that LH 7:2-immunoreactants were distributed irregularly within the lamina densa and sparsely in the sublamina densa region. The patient was diagnosed with pretibial dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.
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ranking = 6
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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4/4. Clinical phenotype of Bart's syndrome seen in a family with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    Background: Bart's syndrome is one type of dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (EB). It is known that, in some familial cases of dominant dystrophic EB, the symptoms differ depending on the individual. We observed the way Bart's syndrome affected four generations in the same family. The proband was a newborn boy who showed congenital localized absence of skin (CLAS) and bullae on the anterior aspects of both legs. Histologically, the bullae were located subepidermally. The CLAS and bullae disappeared within 4 months after birth, leaving scars. His father retained scarring and scaling from the knees down along the anterior aspect of the legs, and the nails of the toes were either lacking or deformed. His paternal grandmother and great-grandmother also presented deformed nails of the toes, although they had not had CLAS or bullae on the legs at birth. The individuals in this family thus showed some heterogeneity depending on the sex: blistering and CLAS were seen on the legs soon after birth in the male family members, but the female members did not share this pattern of symptoms, suggesting that the expression of symptoms may differ depending on the sex of the affected individual.
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ranking = 5
keywords = epidermolysis bullosa, epidermolysis, bullosa
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