Cases reported "Leg Ulcer"

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1/33. Healing of chronic leg ulcers in diabetic necrobiosis lipoidica with local granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor treatment.

    Two young insulin-dependent diabetic patients suffering from chronic nonhealing leg ulcers of necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum were treated by applying topically recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the ulcer repetitively during 10 weeks. Evaluation of ulcer size was assessed with clinical examinations at 1-week or 2-week intervals. Topical GM-CSF healed the ulcers of both patients in 10 weeks. Decrease in the size of the ulcers was already evident after the first topical applications. During follow-up, the ulcers have remained healed for more than 3 years. This excellent treatment result suggests that topically applied GM-CSF may be a valuable drug for chronic, nonhealing ulcers in patients with diabetes.
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keywords = diabetic
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2/33. Primary cutaneous mucormycosis: a diagnosis to consider.

    Primary cutaneous mucormycosis is a deep fungal infection, mainly seen in diabetics and immunocompromised subjects. Rapid diagnosis and therapy are necessary to avoid fatal outcome. We describe the complete histopathological and microbiological studies of primary cutaneous mucormycosis in a 74-year-old man with several risk factors, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory acidosis, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and iatrogenic diabetes, due to corticosteroid therapy. He developed two cutaneous necrotic scars on his left leg. mucormycosis was suspected and specimens from surgical debridement were histopathologically and microbiologically studied confirming the clinical diagnosis. amphotericin b was given topically and intravenously resulting in complete healing of the ulcer. risk factors and microbiological studies are compared with those in the current literature. It is necessary in certain cases to suspect mucormycosis infections in diabetics, immunocompromised subjects and even in healthy individuals. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are important, but they should be based on complete histopathological and microbiological studies, to establish the genus of the causal agent.
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ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = diabetic
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3/33. Frozen allogeneic human epidermal cultured sheets for the cure of complicated leg ulcers.

    BACKGROUND: Skin ulcers due to venous stasis or diabetes are common among the elderly and are difficult to treat. Repeated applications of cell-based products have been reported to result in cure or improvement of leg ulcers of small size in a fraction of patients. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures for the treatment of acute and chronic ulcers. methods: We treated a series of 10 consecutive patients with leg ulcers of different etiology and duration with frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures stored frozen and thawed for 5-10 minutes at room temperature before application. Three patients had ulcers with exposed Achilles or extensor tendon. The ulcers treated were as large as 160 cm2 in area and of up to 20-years' duration. After preliminary preparation of the wounds by debridement to remove necrotic tissue and application of silver sulfadiazine to control infection, thawed cultures were applied biweekly from 2 to 15 times depending on the size and complexity of the ulcer. RESULTS: All ulcers healed, including those with tendon exposure. After the first few applications, granulation tissue formed in the ulcer bed and on exposed tendons, and epidermal healing took place through proliferation and migration of cells from the margins of the wound. The time required for complete healing ranged from 1 to 31 weeks after the first application. CONCLUSION: The use of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures is a safe and effective treatment for venous or diabetic ulcers, even those with tendon exposure. It seems possible that any leg ulcer will be amenable to successful treatment by this method.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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4/33. The reversal sural artery neurocutaneous island flap in composite lower extremity wound reconstruction.

    Reconstruction of the lower third of the leg and the forefoot remains a challenge due to a lack of regional muscle units and minimal subcutaneous tissues. Reverse island flaps have been applied to similar reconstructive problems in the upper extremity. Recently, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap has been utilized to reconstruct complex wounds of the lower extremity and forefoot in young and middle-aged individuals. We present our use of the flap in a patient cohort 65 years of age or older. Unique among this group was the high prevalence of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Nonetheless, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap proved a safe and reliable means of achieving wound closure.
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ranking = 0.035224753030681
keywords = vascular disease
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5/33. hydroxyurea induced leg ulcers.

    A 34 years non diabetic lady with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) was treated with hydroxyurea and interferon. She developed leg ulcers. First time on left toe and three months later on right foot, a rare complication of hydroxyurea. Both were treated with local wound care and antibiotics. First time dose of hydroxyurea was reduced and second time drug was discontinued.
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keywords = diabetic
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6/33. Healing of diabetes and vascular ulcers on switching from peritoneal dialysis to hemodialysis.

    Vascular complications are the main problem in diabetic patients and can be worsened by continuous ambulatorial peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A 46-year old woman with a family history of diabetes progressively developed hyperglycemia and subsequently lower limb ulcers after beginning CAPD. Hypertonic bags were required to control fluid balance. On account of the severe and painful ulcers, the patient was changed to hemodialysis. Within a few weeks her diabetes improved and the vascular ulcers healed completely.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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7/33. Pinch graft skin transplantation for leg ulcers in primary care.

    Pinch grafting offers an alternative approach to conventional management of chronic leg ulcers, and is particularly well suited for venous and diabetic ulcers. Relevant literature from 1872-1998 was reviewed. The method of pinch grafting is described here in detail, and is illustrated by two case reports. Since pinch grafting hastens the healing of granulating wounds, is easy to perform and does not require strict immobilisation, a revival of the method, with adaptation for primary care, should be encouraged.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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8/33. Unilateral necrobiosis lipoidica of the ischemic limb--a case report.

    A 63-year-old diabetic woman presented with new-onset intermittent claudication of the right calf accompanied by ipsilateral necrobiosis lipoidica (NL). The latter presented the typical appearance of oval, indurated plaques, with brownish-red margins and central atrophy, scattered over the right thigh and calf. Arteriography demonstrated severe obstructive lesions on the right femoral artery. NL and claudication spared the left leg. A possible ischemic pathogenesis of NL emerges from this observation and is supported by recent studies in the literature.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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9/33. Contreet Foam and Contreet Hydrocolloid: an insight into two new silver-containing dressings.

    in vitro laboratory tests and preliminary clinical trials have found that two silver-containing dressings, Contreet Foam and Contreet Hydrocolloid, promote healing in infected and chronic venous leg ulcers and diabetic foot ulcers.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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10/33. Intractable livedoid vasculopathy successfully treated with hyperbaric oxygen.

    We describe a new method for treating livedoid vasculopathy. The typical presentation of livedoid vasculopathy includes chronic, recurrent painful ulcers, satellite scar-like atrophy and telangiectasia involving the lower extremities. Histologically, these lesions show areas of ulceration and dermal vessel occlusion without frank inflammatory cell infiltration. There is currently no satisfactory therapy available for this disease. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has recently established itself as one of the most effective methods of treating ischaemic wounds, including diabetic ulcers. We used this therapy in two patients whose lesions were resistant to multiple therapeutic modalities. Not only did their ulcers respond rapidly to the HBO therapy, but the disturbing wound pain also resolved at the same time. To our knowledge, this is the first successful trial of HBO therapy in livedoid vasculopathy. We believe this to be a very promising new therapy for livedoid vasculopathy and to be worth further investigation.
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ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = diabetic
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