Cases reported "Leg Ulcer"

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1/103. hydroxyurea-related leg ulcers in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    The unusual appearance of extensive skin ulcerations has been reported in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) undergoing continuous chemotherapy with hydroxyurea. It is thought that hydroxyurea, an antineoplastic agent with selective cytotoxicity for cells that divide most actively (such as those of the skin), causes these ulcerations through impairment of normal wound healing in areas of common trauma. The most common site of ulcers is the leg, where the ulcers are often extremely painful, with violaceous macules surrounding them, and are associated with extensive edema. On biopsy, histological vascular changes include leukocytoclastic vasculitis, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration, formation of thrombus, swelling of the endothelial cells, and thickening of the vascular walls. We report successful split-thickness skin grafting on hydroxyurea-related leg ulcers after preoperative discontinuation of hydroxyurea treatment in a patient with CML. The possible pathogenesis of hydroxyurea-related leg ulcers is discussed.
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2/103. Maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable wounds.

    BACKGROUND: Fly maggots have been known for centuries to help debride and heal wounds. Maggot therapy was first introduced in the USA in 1931 and was routinely used there until the mid-1940s in over 300 hospitals. With the advent of antimicrobiols, maggot therapy became rare until the early 1990s, when it was re-introduced in the USA, UK, and israel. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of maggot therapy for the treatment of intractable, chronic wounds and ulcers in long-term hospitalized patients in israel. methods: Twenty-five patients, suffering mostly from chronic leg ulcers and pressure sores in the lower sacral area, were treated in an open study using maggots of the green bottle fly, Phaenicia sericata. The wounds had been present for 1-90 months before maggot therapy was applied. Thirty-five wounds were located on the foot or calf of the patients, one on the thumb, while the pressure sores were on the lower back. Sterile maggots (50-1000) were administered to the wound two to five times weekly and replaced every 1-2 days. Hospitalized patients were treated in five departments of the Hadassah Hospital, two geriatric hospitals, and one outpatient clinic in Jerusalem. The underlying diseases or the causes of the development of wounds were venous stasis (12), paraplegia (5), hemiplegia (2), Birger's disease (1), lymphostasis (1), thalassemia (1), polycythemia (1), dementia (1), and basal cell carcinoma (1). Subjects were examined daily or every second day until complete debridement of the wound was noted. RESULTS: Complete debridement was achieved in 38 wounds (88.4%); in three wounds (7%), the debridement was significant, in one (2.3%) partial, and one wound (2.3%) remained unchanged. In five patients who were referred for amputation of the leg, the extremities was salvaged after maggot therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Maggot therapy is a relatively rapid and effective treatment, particularly in large necrotic wounds requiring debridement and resistant to conventional treatment and conservative surgical intervention.
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3/103. Frozen allogeneic human epidermal cultured sheets for the cure of complicated leg ulcers.

    BACKGROUND: skin ulcers due to venous stasis or diabetes are common among the elderly and are difficult to treat. Repeated applications of cell-based products have been reported to result in cure or improvement of leg ulcers of small size in a fraction of patients. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures for the treatment of acute and chronic ulcers. methods: We treated a series of 10 consecutive patients with leg ulcers of different etiology and duration with frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures stored frozen and thawed for 5-10 minutes at room temperature before application. Three patients had ulcers with exposed Achilles or extensor tendon. The ulcers treated were as large as 160 cm2 in area and of up to 20-years' duration. After preliminary preparation of the wounds by debridement to remove necrotic tissue and application of silver sulfadiazine to control infection, thawed cultures were applied biweekly from 2 to 15 times depending on the size and complexity of the ulcer. RESULTS: All ulcers healed, including those with tendon exposure. After the first few applications, granulation tissue formed in the ulcer bed and on exposed tendons, and epidermal healing took place through proliferation and migration of cells from the margins of the wound. The time required for complete healing ranged from 1 to 31 weeks after the first application. CONCLUSION: The use of frozen human allogeneic epidermal cultures is a safe and effective treatment for venous or diabetic ulcers, even those with tendon exposure. It seems possible that any leg ulcer will be amenable to successful treatment by this method.
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4/103. dexamethasone-induced healing of chronic leg ulcers in a patient with defective organization of the extracellular matrix of fibronectin.

    Previous investigations have shown that skin fibroblasts derived from patients affected by ehlers-danlos syndrome (EDS) lack an organized extracellular matrix (ECM) of fibronectin (FN). As retarded wound healing is a sign of EDS, we hypothesized that a young healthy man suffering from chronic recalcitrant leg ulcers might be affected by a defect of FN-ECM organization similar to that observed in EDS. Immunofluorescence of cultured skin fibroblasts obtained from skin biopsies from the patient and a control demonstrated that the patient's fibroblasts lacked FN-ECM organization, in contrast with those of the control; this was restored by 10-7 mol/L dexamethasone (DEX) in vitro. DEX treatment of the patient was associated with healing of his leg ulcers. In conclusion, DEX may be effective in reversing impaired wound healing associated with a lack of FN-ECM organization
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keywords = wound
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5/103. The reversal sural artery neurocutaneous island flap in composite lower extremity wound reconstruction.

    Reconstruction of the lower third of the leg and the forefoot remains a challenge due to a lack of regional muscle units and minimal subcutaneous tissues. Reverse island flaps have been applied to similar reconstructive problems in the upper extremity. Recently, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap has been utilized to reconstruct complex wounds of the lower extremity and forefoot in young and middle-aged individuals. We present our use of the flap in a patient cohort 65 years of age or older. Unique among this group was the high prevalence of diabetes and peripheral vascular disease. Nonetheless, the reverse sural artery neurocutaneous island flap proved a safe and reliable means of achieving wound closure.
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6/103. Leg ulcers in patients with myeloproliferative disorders: disease- or treatment-related?

    Leg ulcers are a relatively frequent problem in patients with myeloproliferative disorders under treatment with hydroxyurea (HU). The pathogenesis is currently unknown and may be multifactorial. Concomitant arterial or venous disease may play a contributing role in the development of these wounds. vasculitis, cryoglobulinemia and pyoderma gangrenosum should be considered if typical clinical signs are present. We report on 3 patients with myeloproliferative disorders who developed HU-induced leg ulcers and review the literature. HU-induced leg ulcers share clinical features which can help to differentiate them from leg ulcers of other etiologies: occurrence under long-term treatment with HU at a dose of at least 1 g/day, localization in the malleolar region and spontaneous healing when HU is discontinued. We conclude that differentiation between disease-related and treatment-induced leg ulcers can be difficult and may not always be possible. In HU-induced leg ulcers, cessation of the drug typically leads to wound healing. copyright (R) 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel
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7/103. Treatment of a patient with a deep leg ulcer using Biatain Adhesive.

    This article looks at the use of Biatain Adhesive, a new foam dressing from Coloplast which is manufactured by incorporating 3D polymer structures within the central pad. It is now available on the Drug Tariff. The article discusses the treatment of exuding wounds and highlights the benefits of Biatain Adhesive by focusing on the case of an 84-year-old woman who had a history of long-standing leg ulcers where previous dressings had failed to promote healing.
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keywords = wound
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8/103. Accelerated healing of pyoderma gangrenosum treated with bioengineered skin and concomitant immunosuppression.

    pyoderma gangrenosum is a rare, destructive, neutrophilic dermatosis, the origin of which remains largely obscure. The ulcerative variant of this inflammatory disorder causes painful, necrotic, rapidly enlarging ulcers. Because of pathergy, many clinicians avoid managing these nonhealing ulcers with aggressive surgical debridement and autologous grafts. This article proposes that the application of an allogeneic cultured human skin equivalent (Graftskin) not only circumvents this problem, but also hastens re-epithelialization of the ulcer bed. An added benefit of the possible improvement of the cosmetic appearance of the final scar by preventing severe wound contracture is also postulated. We report a newly diagnosed case of ulcerative pyoderma gangrenosum; the use of bioengineered skin as an adjunct to concurrent immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine hastened the healing and diminished pain in a rapidly enlarging leg ulcer. Within 2 weeks, the ulcer was 30% to 40% healed, achieving 100% re-epithelialization within 6 weeks.
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keywords = wound
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9/103. hydroxyurea induced leg ulcers.

    A 34 years non diabetic lady with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) was treated with hydroxyurea and interferon. She developed leg ulcers. First time on left toe and three months later on right foot, a rare complication of hydroxyurea. Both were treated with local wound care and antibiotics. First time dose of hydroxyurea was reduced and second time drug was discontinued.
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10/103. Malignancy in chronic ulcers and scars of the leg (Marjolin's ulcer): a study of 21 patients.

    OBJECTIVE: To study the imaging features of patients with chronic ulcers of the leg that were associated with malignancy. DESIGN AND patients: All patients who on biopsy were proven to have malignancy--the majority of which were squamous cell carcinoma-were included in a prospective study. Ulcers limited to the foot were excluded but ulcers of the leg which extended into the foot were included. amputation was performed in all but two patients, due to pain, bleeding or tissue necrosis. RESULTS: The etiology was multifactorial. The mean duration of the ulcers was 36 years including venous ulcers, extensive scarring of the leg secondary to infection, injury or burns. One ulcer was secondary to a snake bite. The remainder, usually in the upper part of the leg, had repeated episodes of blunt trauma or knife wounds, which were also complicated by infections which failed to heal or, if they healed, regularly recurred. Although arterial insufficiency was not primary in any patient, most were of advanced age and it may have been an element in some patients. Despite infection, osteomyelitis was present in only one patient. The essential features were bone destruction, soft tissue mass and periosteal reaction. The bone destruction was visible on the radiographs in all but one case. The soft tissue masses varied in size but in general were very large. The periosteal reaction varied in type but most commonly was lamellated. The classic undulating solid periosteal reaction of venous stasis was only occasionally present. The periosteal reaction was nonspecific in the majority of cases and did not aid in the diagnosis or etiology. MRI and CT studies were performed in six patients. These were helpful in defining the extent of bone destruction and periosteal reaction but were not essential in management. CONCLUSION: Chronic ulcer present for decades that then undergoes malignant change is a disease of developing countries where patients only consult physicians when they have developed complications such as pain, bleeding or tissue necrosis. Chronic ulcers may require to be biopsied at regular intervals as malignant change in these ulcers is directly related to their duration.
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keywords = wound
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