Cases reported "Leiomyoma"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

11/36. A menopausal woman with mullerian agenesis, a leiomyoma, an inguinal hernia, and cystadenofibromas.

    BACKGROUND: Mullerian agenesis, the second most common cause of primary amenorrhea, affects 1 in 4,000 to 10,000 women. Although the majority of these women have complete absence of the uterus, a small percentage can have a rudimentary uterus. CASE: A menopausal nulligravida with known mullerian agenesis developed a large pelvic mass and an inguinal hernia. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy, which revealed a large leiomyoma growing from a small rudimentary uterus, an indirect inguinal hernia, and bilateral benign serous cystadenofibroma. CONCLUSION: women with mullerian agenesis and rudimentary uteri can develop gynecologic pathology similar to women with normal genital tracts.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

12/36. pelvic organ prolapse after uterine artery embolization for uterine myoma.

    uterine artery embolization (UAE) is gaining popularity as a treatment modality in patients with symptomatic uterine fibroids who do not desire fertility. Complications of this procedure can be serious and disabling. A 50-year-old woman presented with stage II uterovaginal prolapse after UAE for symptomatic uterine fibroids. pelvic organ prolapse developed 16 months after the initial procedure. Surgical correction was performed. This is the first case report of pelvic organ prolapse after UAE. Normal prior gynecological examinations, and absence of pelvic pressure symptoms, indicate that pelvic organ prolapse had occurred subsequent to UAE.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

13/36. Intraoperative ultrasound during a laparoscopic myomectomy.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a gynecologic use of a laparoscopic ultrasound transducer to isolate a myoma for surgical removal. DESIGN: Case report. SETTING: University-based infertility practice. PATIENT(S): A 44-year-old woman gravida 1 para 1 with history of a first trimester miscarriage who desired pregnancy as a participant in the donor egg program. INTERVENTION(S): Before she entered the assisted reproduction program, a patient was found to have a myoma that was greater than 2 cm with both intramural and submucosal components. During the laparoscopic evaluation, a laparoscopic ultrasound transducer helped identify and properly locate the myoma in what otherwise appeared to be a normal uterus. Appropriate laparoscopic hysterotomy incision was then made, thereby minimizing uterine trauma. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Appropriately placed hysterotomy incision and successful reconstruction of uterus. RESULT(S): After the successful laparoscopic myomectomy, the patient achieved a pregnancy in our donor oocyte program. CONCLUSION(S): Laparoscopic intraoperative ultrasound can help gynecologic surgeons complete a laparoscopic myomectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

14/36. An unusual case of ectopic or "parasitic" leiomyoma excised by laparoscopic surgery.

    A 47-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic resection of a large ectopic or "parasitic" fibroid filling the pelvis and placed within the rectosigmoid mesentery. The tumor was excised completely without a need for hysterectomy. Immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies confirmed a "parasitic" leiomyoma, excluding sarcoma or a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Because of its bizarre location in relation to the large bowel, a combined general surgical and gynecological approach was used successfully. The pathology of this rare tumor is reviewed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

15/36. erythropoietin and erythropoietin receptor system in a large uterine myoma of a patient with myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome: possible relationship with the pathogenesis of unusual tumor size.

    The rare condition of women with erythrocytosis and a concurrent myomatous uterus has been classified as "myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome". Substantial myoma size has been noted as a common denominator in this condition in which recent evidence have confirmed erythropoietin (Epo) production by myoma tissues themselves. Apart from its primary endocrine role in controlling erythropoiesis, Epo has been demonstrated to mediate several cellular processes such as angiogenesis, mitogenesis, and inhibition of apoptosis by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Recently, Epo and its receptor (Epo-R) have been shown to be involved in the growth, viability, and angiogenesis of several malignant tumors including human female reproductive organ malignancies. In this paper, we researched on Epo and, as a first in the literature, Epo-R immunoexpression in a large uterine myoma of a term pregnant patient suffering from the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome. Eight nongravidic leiomyomas and 8 gravidic leiomyomas were used as control group samples. Apart from confirming Epo production by myoma smooth muscle cells in the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome, we reveal in this pathologic condition a characteristic strong Epo-R expression in myoma endothelial cells and a weak and sporadic Epo-R expression in myoma smooth muscle cells. The striking presence of Epo-R within myoma tissues in the case of the myomatous erythrocytosis syndrome allows us to speculate that myoma Epo production, besides determining erythrocytosis through systemic effects, may contribute, acting by autocrine and paracrine mechanisms, in determining the large myoma size almost always observed in this condition. Finally, we confirm a less but specific immunostaining for Epo in uterine myomas of patients without erythrocytosis and, as a first in the literature, we prove a weak and sporadic Epo-R expression in these lesions. These last results may contribute to knowledge of the yet unclear etiopathogenesis of the most common human gynecologic neoplasm.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

16/36. Cystic degeneration of a leiomyoma masquerading as a postoperative abscess.

    Leiomyomas are common tumors that usually have a typical sonographic appearance. With degeneration, however, the sonographic findings may be completely uncharacteristic. We report a case of a multicystic anterior uterine wall mass detected at antenatal sonography in an asymptomatic patient. Differential diagnosis included myoma, varicosity, hematoma, abscess, uterine anomaly, and pelvic neoplasm. At cesarean section, the mass was confirmed to be a myoma. Postoperatively, an ultrasound was performed by the radiology service during evaluation of suspected endometritis and the mass was interpreted as an endometrial abscess. This case illustrates that myomas can present with sonographic features consistent with a number of pathologic disorders. This variable pattern of echogenicity may sometimes create difficulty in establishing a correct diagnosis. The case also demonstrates the importance of communication between services and the need for not only antenatal but also postpartum and gynecologic ultrasound studies to be performed by physicians trained in sonographic findings of the abnormal uterus.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/36. De novo growth of a large preperitoneal lipoleiomyoma of the abdominal wall.

    BACKGROUND: Extrauterine lipoleiomyomas are an uncommon finding, especially in the preperitoneum. These benign tumors have been attributed to seeding after surgical fibroid resection, exogenous hormonal therapy, or major disturbances in glucose metabolism. CASE: We are reporting the case of a postmenopausal woman without any history of gynecological surgery, hormonal therapy, or significant metabolic abnormality who developed a large, symptomatic, preperitoneal lipoleiomyoma requiring resection. The patient had an uneventful recovery with full resolution of her symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our case relates the first description to our knowledge of the de novo growth of a large lipoleiomyoma in an incisional umbilical scar independent of gynecological pathology or hormonal influence.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

18/36. Pseudo-renal failure following total abdominal hysterectomy.

    Intraperitoneal urinary bladder perforation should be in the differential diagnosis of acute oliguric renal failure soon after gynecological surgery. We present a case of reversible acute pseudo-renal failure after total abdominal hysterectomy for uterine fibroid. Biochemical features of uremia occur as a result of intraperitoneal extravasation of urine, which is in turn reabsorbed through the peritoneum. Early recognition and surgical repair, as opposed to dialysis therapy, are warranted in such clinical setting. Nephrologists, who are often the first to encounter those patients with presumably acute renal failure, should be aware of this condition. Prompt recovery of the serum biochemistry is to be expected, in contradistinction to genuine renal failure or kidney insults.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

19/36. Recurrent endometrial stromal tumors with smooth-muscle differentiation and a protracted clinical course.

    BACKGROUND: A 24-year-old white female gravida 1, para 0010, presented with heavy vaginal bleeding and abdominal cramps of 2 weeks' duration. Medical history was remarkable for spontaneous abortion 5 years previously. She had no significant family history or other gynecological problems. physical examination revealed tissue fragments and blood clots oozing from the cervical os, and her uterus was diffusely enlarged. INVESTIGATIONS: physical examination, ultrasound, uterine dilation and curettage, immunohistochemistry and human androgen receptor gene clonality analysis, uterine sonohistogram, MRI and exploratory laparotomy. diagnosis: Intrauterine dissemination of endometrial stromal tumors with smooth-muscle differentiation. MANAGEMENT: Partial wedge resection of the anterior uterine wall via abdominal myomectomy and total abdominal hysterectomy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

20/36. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septal masses: a diagnostic pitfall.

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Most GISTs arise in the stomach and small bowel, whereas a small number occur elsewhere in the GI tract. Rare cases are identified outside the GI tract and are collectively known as extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs). Because of their malignant potential and recent advances in the management of GISTs with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Glivec), it is imperative that these tumors are correctly diagnosed. In this study, we reviewed the clinical and pathologic characteristics of 3 cases of EGIST presenting as vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septal masses that were originally misdiagnosed, presumably due to their unusual anatomic locations. The original diagnoses were leiomyoma in one case and leiomyosarcoma in 2 cases. The lesions were localized to the rectovaginal septum () or vagina () and ranged from 4 to 8 cm in diameter. All 3 lesions had a spindle cell morphology that mimicked a smooth muscle tumor. Mitotic figures numbered from 12/50 to 16/50 high power fields (HPFs; median 15). immunohistochemistry revealed that all 3 cases were strongly positive for KIT (CD117) and CD34 and negative for smooth muscle actin, desmin, pan-cytokeratin, and estrogen receptor. KIT sequence analysis revealed oncogenic mutations in all 3 cases. The first tumor recurred at 2 years and the second tumor recurred at 10 years; the third case is too recent for meaningful follow-up. EGISTs that present as gynecologic masses are rare but may be more common than is currently recognized. Misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate therapy because conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not effective in the treatment of GISTs, whereas imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Glivec) has a proven role in managing these tumors. Thus, it is imperative to consider EGISTs in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal neoplasms in the vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septum.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
<- Previous || Next ->


Leave a message about 'Leiomyoma'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.