Cases reported "Leiomyomatosis"

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1/17. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of esophageal leiomyomatosis.

    Leiomyomata are the most common benign neoplasms of the esophagus, but they are still very rare in comparison to malignant tumors of this organ. We report on the aspiration cytology findings of a case of esophageal leiomyomatosis in a 19-yr-old man. Diagn. Cytopathol. 1999;21:197-199.
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2/17. Progressive esophageal leiomyomatosis with respiratory compromise.

    leiomyomatosis is a rare neoplastic condition of the pediatric esophagus. Presenting symptoms usually overlap with more common esophageal disorders, namely, gastroesophageal reflux. A patient is presented in whom leiomyomatosis progressed to the point of causing cachexia and respiratory compromise.
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3/17. Esophageal leiomyomatosis in a woman with a history of vulvar leiomyoma and Barrett's esophagus: a case report and review of the literature.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis and treatment of esophageal pathology remains a challenge despite advances in preoperative endoscopy, radiographic staging, and perioperative care. CASE REPORT: In this article, we present an interesting case of esophageal leiomyomatosis in a woman with a history of vulvar leiomyoma and Barrett's esophagus. This paper represents the first reported simultaneous occurrence of these three pathologic entities in the English literature. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical presentation and characteristic pathologic findings in patients with esophageal leiomyomatosis are reviewed. Diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to esophageal masses are discussed including the indications for esophageal resection.
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keywords = esophagus
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4/17. Multiple solitary leiomyomata of the esophagus.

    The present report communicates a case of multiple solitary leiomyomata of the esophagus. This is an uncommon condition in which multiple, non-confluent, benign esophageal tumors arise in the same patient. The ideal treatment is enucleation of the lesions, but when these are--as in the case reported--huge and annular, or affect the gastroesophageal junction, resection of the gullet must be performed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = esophagus
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5/17. Diffuse leiomyomatosis of the esophagus.

    BACKGROUND: Leiomyomas are rare esophagus neoplasms. They are usually solitary, and the diffuse lesion is extremely rare. CASE REPORT: A 19-year-old male presented with a 3-year history of occasional dysphagia and postprandial regurgitation. The chest radiographs showed a huge mass in the posterior mediastinum. barium esophagograms showed narrowing of the middle third esophagus with proximal dilatation. The fibroesophagoscopy demonstrated multiple submucosal nodules below a level 22 cm from the incisor and covered with intact mucosa. CT scans of the chest showed a long segment of circumferential soft tissue in the posterior mediastinum which encircled and involved the upper two thirds of the esophagus. An intrathoracic esophagectomy with cervical esophagogastrostomy via the substernal route was performed. Grossly, multiple confluent myomatous nodules circumferentially involved the upper and middle third of the esophagus. Histologic findings showed diffuse leiomyomatosis of the esophagus. CONCLUSION: Esophageal leiomyomatosis should be considered in a young patient with long-standing dysphagia in whom smooth, tapered esophageal narrowing on barium study and circumferential esophageal wall thickening on CT scan are seen. An esophagectomy combined with a reconstruction procedure is indicated.
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ranking = 9
keywords = esophagus
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6/17. Imaging features of esophageal leiomyomatosis: a case report.

    Leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors of the esophagus. However, esophageal leiomyomatosis is a rare pathologic entity that has received little attention in the radiologic literature. We present a case of esophageal leiomyomatosis with imaging features on barium swallow and computed tomography (CT).
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7/17. Alport syndrome with diffuse leiomyomatosis.

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary nephropathy with hematuria progressing to end-stage renal failure (ESRF), sensorineural deafness, and specific eye signs (lenticonus, macular flecks, and congenital cataracts). Inheritance is X-linked in about 85% of the cases, caused by different mutations in the COL4A5 gene. Rarely AS is seen in combination with diffuse leiomyomatosis (DL). DL is a tumorous process involving smooth muscle cells, mostly of the esophagus, but also of the tracheobronchial tree and the female genital tract. Characteristically, the patients have deletions of the 5'-end of both the COL4A5 and the COL4A6 genes, respectively. We here present a 9-year-old boy who was admitted because of a newly diagnosed sensorineural deafness. He was born with cataracts and presented symptoms of dysphagia and bronchial irritation in the first year of life. Macroscopic hematuria was first noticed at 2 years during a febrile infection. Since early childhood the boy suffered from severe constipation. Taking together these symptoms, the diagnosis of Alport syndrome with diffuse leiomyomatosis (AS-DL) has to be considered. Genetic analysis demonstrated the predicted deletion of the COL4A5/COL4A6 genes.
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8/17. Diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis: another cause of pseudoachalasia.

    The patient was a 22-year-old woman who had presented in early childhood with gastroesophageal reflux and who subsequently underwent surgery. It was commented upon by the surgeons at that time that the esophagus was abnormally thickened. The patient subsequently presented during her first pregnancy with a vulval tumor, which proved histologically to be a leiomyoma. She was also found to have a grossly dilated esophagus and was thought to have achalasia. However, endoscopic ultrasound imaging showed gross hypertrophy of the mid- and distal esophageal wall, with only mild symptoms of dysphagia, which had been long-standing. The appearance of the esophagus was consistent with diffuse esophageal leiomyomatosis. In view of the associated vulval leiomyoma, the patient demonstrated esophagovulvar syndrome.
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ranking = 3
keywords = esophagus
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9/17. diagnosis and management of diffuse leiomyomatosis of the oesophagus.

    Diffuse leiomyomatosis of the oesophagus is a rare entity among oesophageal diseases. Histopathologically it is characterized by diffuse hypertrophy of the muscular layer extending to the whole oesophagus predominantly in the lower third, where it can result in tumour formation. leiomyomatosis can involve the upper part of the stomach and is frequently associated with genital or tracheobronchial (bronchitracheal) muscular localizations. Also, it can be associated with Alport's syndrome in familial cases. For diagnosis, barium swallow, computerized tomography (CT) scan and, in recent years, endoscopic ultrasonography are used. Oesophageal resection is the only suitable treatment in symptomatic cases. We report three observations during 1979-95.
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ranking = 6
keywords = esophagus
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10/17. Ureteral leiomyoma causing hydronephrosis in Type 1 multiple endocrine neoplasia.

    A rare case of leiomyoma of the ureter in a patient with type 1 multiple endocrine neoplasia (men) is reported. The case is of a Japanese man in his forties who had a past history of parathyroid gland hyperplasia, pancreatic islet cell tumors, and bilateral adrenocortical nodular hyperplasia. The leiomyoma, measuring 15 x 13 x 12 mm, was located in the right upper ureter, obstructing the lumen and causing hydronephrosis. Three small leiomyomas were also detected in the lower portion. Furthermore, histological examination revealed three tiny leiomyomatous nodules embedded in the muscular layer. It has been reported that type 1 men is often complicated by multiple leiomyoma in many organs, including the esophagus, stomach, lung, uterus, and skin. However, it is believed that this is the first report of leiomyomatosis of the ureter occurring in a patient with type 1 men. It should be recognized that multiple ureteral leiomyomas may develop in patients of type 1 men and can potentially result in hydronephrosis. The multiple development of leiomyoma suggests a causal relationship to MEN1 gene alteration.
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