Cases reported "Leiomyosarcoma"

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11/17. Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septal masses: a diagnostic pitfall.

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Most GISTs arise in the stomach and small bowel, whereas a small number occur elsewhere in the GI tract. Rare cases are identified outside the GI tract and are collectively known as extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs). Because of their malignant potential and recent advances in the management of GISTs with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Glivec), it is imperative that these tumors are correctly diagnosed. In this study, we reviewed the clinical and pathologic characteristics of 3 cases of EGIST presenting as vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septal masses that were originally misdiagnosed, presumably due to their unusual anatomic locations. The original diagnoses were leiomyoma in one case and leiomyosarcoma in 2 cases. The lesions were localized to the rectovaginal septum () or vagina () and ranged from 4 to 8 cm in diameter. All 3 lesions had a spindle cell morphology that mimicked a smooth muscle tumor. Mitotic figures numbered from 12/50 to 16/50 high power fields (HPFs; median 15). immunohistochemistry revealed that all 3 cases were strongly positive for KIT (CD117) and CD34 and negative for smooth muscle actin, desmin, pan-cytokeratin, and estrogen receptor. KIT sequence analysis revealed oncogenic mutations in all 3 cases. The first tumor recurred at 2 years and the second tumor recurred at 10 years; the third case is too recent for meaningful follow-up. EGISTs that present as gynecologic masses are rare but may be more common than is currently recognized. Misdiagnosis may lead to inappropriate therapy because conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy are not effective in the treatment of GISTs, whereas imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, Glivec) has a proven role in managing these tumors. Thus, it is imperative to consider EGISTs in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal neoplasms in the vulvovaginal/rectovaginal septum.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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12/17. Triple simultaneous primary gynecological malignancies in a 56-year-old patient.

    The occurrence of double simultaneous primary cancers is common. However, the occurrence of synchronous primary triple gynecological malignancies is an extremely rare event. In this report, the clinical and pathologic findings of a 56-year-old female patient with synchronous triple primary gynecological cancers including well-differentiated ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma, well-differentiated endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and uterine leiomyosarcoma were presented. Synchronous primary, well-differentiated endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma and leiomyosarcoma of uterus without any ovarian neoplasm has only been once described in the English literature. To our knowledge, the presented patient is the first case in aspect of accompanying ovarian mucinous adenocarcinoma to endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma and leiomyosarcoma of uterus.
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ranking = 6
keywords = gynecologic
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13/17. Uterine leiomyosarcoma--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Magnetic resonance (MR) scanning shows great promise as an imaging tool to evaluate the pelvis as a result of contrast resolution and lack of ionizing radiation. For these reasons, it is assuming an important role in staging gynecologic neoplasms, and evaluating diseases in the gravid pelvis. A case of uterine leiomyosarcoma is presented in which MR imaging was able to delineate the extent and tissue characteristics of the lesion more precisely than CT scan.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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14/17. superior vena cava syndrome associated with gynecologic malignancy.

    superior vena cava syndrome is an infrequently noted complication associated with gynecologic malignancy. Three cases illustrate modern diagnostic and management methods. patients developed superior vena cava syndrome secondary to mediastinal metastatic endometrial carcinoma, uterine leiomyosarcoma, and secondary to thrombosis induced by a subclavian hyperalimentation catheter. awareness of this condition on oncology units and by physicians using central venous catheters is important to afford the prompt diagnosis and appropriate management of this life-threatening condition.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gynecologic
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15/17. Immediate vaginal reconstruction following resection for malignancy using the gluteal thigh flap.

    Immediate flap closure of perineal defects following extirpative procedures for gynecologic malignancies is highly desirable. Advantages include more rapid healing, reduced infection rate, decreased nutritional demands, early rehabilitation, greater safety in radiated fields, and more functional results. The posterior thigh flap, deriving its blood supply from the inferior gluteal artery, was used in 7 patients (9 flaps) with excellent results. The flap has proven reliable and quite feasible at the time of resection. While most partial pelvic or vaginal defects can be reconstructed with a single flap, bilateral flaps are recommended for more extensive defects. The major postoperative problem has been discomfort while sitting and paresthesias along the distribution of the posterior cutaneous nerve. To avoid these problems, the flap should be rotated distal to the ischium and, in subtotal reconstruction, the nerve excluded.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
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16/17. Sister Joseph's nodule: seven cases of umbilical metastases from gynecologic malignancies.

    Seven cases of patients with gynecologic cancer and Sister Joseph's nodule, umbilical metastases from intraabdominal malignancy, are presented, making a total of 44 such cases in the literature. One such case, uterine leiomyosarcoma with umbilical metastases, is the first such lesion reported. Although the prognosis is generally poor, a few long-term survivors have been reported, and aggressive therapy may be warranted, particularly in patients with ovarian malignancy.
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ranking = 5
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

17/17. leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine presenting as a pelvic mass.

    We present a challenging case of differential diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine in a patient presented with a pelvic mass. This 43-year-old Japanese woman complained of hypermenorrhea and was diagnosed as myoma uteri. She underwent partial resection of the ileum with a primary end-to-end anastomosis, omentectomy, and appendectomy, as well as a simple hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. CT and MRI indicated an intestinal tumor at the gaseous site. The histological diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma of the small intestine and leiomyoma of the uterus. Although such leiomyosarcomas are rare, they can appear as pelvic masses and must be differentiated from gynecologic disease. Preoperative CT and MRI of the abdomen were useful in obtaining the diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = gynecologic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
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