Cases reported "Leiomyosarcoma"

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1/11. Primary epithelioid leiomyosarcoma of bone. Case report and literature review.

    We describe an epithelioid leiomyosarcoma of bone located in the right knee of a 51-year-old woman. Plain radiograph and CT scan revealed a poorly defined lytic and destructive mass in the upper metaepiphyseal right tibia which involved surrounding soft tissues. The lesion was composed of proliferating monotonous round cells with a high mitotic activity with scanty intersecting spindle cell fascicles. immunohistochemistry of both areas demonstrated a strong positivity for actin (HHF-35 and alpha-SMA) and vimentin, and negative reactions for desmin, keratin (AE1 AE3), epithelial membrane antigen, S-100 protein, factor viii-related antigen, CD 31 and CD 34. Ultrastructural study confirmed a diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. This is the first detailed description of the microscopic and radiological features of primary epithelioid leiomyosarcoma of bone.
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2/11. Treatment of solid tumors following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    Second solid tumors are well known late complications after bone marrow transplantation. Treatment strategies are ill defined. We retrospectively evaluated treatment and outcome in a single institution. From August 1974 to July 1996, six solid tumors were observed in five of 387 patients 2 to 13 years after BMT, corresponding to a probability of developing a second solid tumor of 9% (1-17%, 95 CI) at 15 years: these comprised endometrial carcinoma, carcinoma of the thyroid gland, cervical carcinoma, sarcoma of the small intestine, osteosarcoma of the tibia and ovarian carcinoma. All five patients were treated as intensively as they would be without a history of BMT. At last follow-up four of the five patients were alive and without signs of tumor. We postulate that second solid tumors after BMT should be treated as de novo tumors. Early detection based on consequent clinical follow-up of the transplant patients might explain the relatively good outcome.
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3/11. leiomyosarcoma in peripheral nerve: the first case report.

    A neoplasm of the peripheral nerves can be obscured, especially during the early phase. The authors report a patient with sciatic nerve leiomyosarcoma. The patient's presentation and initial management are unique. A 51-year-old man with clinical manifestations of von Recklinghausen's disease reported numbness and weakness of the left leg for one and a half years. The symptoms gradually progressed. The symptoms were consistent with peripheral neuritis. The patient developed foot drop one month before coming to our service. Two episodes of biopsy confirmed leiomyosarcoma. A long, large sciatic nerve leiomyosarcoma was found intra-operatively, positioned from the upper thigh to the point where the tibial nerve passes beneath the upper margin of the soleus muscle. Surgical resection was done and confirmed the diagnosis. Decreased sensation was still intact after resection.
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4/11. Subperiosteal leiomyosarcoma of the tibia.

    Primary leiomyosarcoma of bone is a rare malignant tumor of smooth muscle. We report a case of low-grade subperiosteal primary bone leiomyosarcoma in the tibial diaphysis, which radiologically appeared to be osteoid osteoma. A 35-year-old man presented with a several-year history of a palpable hard nodule in the distal left leg, which had enlarged and become painful over the previous 2 years. Radiographs showed solid periosteal reaction with a well-defined lytic lesion in the posteromedial cortical border of the left tibial diaphysis. Computed tomography demonstrated a small, well-defined lytic lesion, not calcified, in a subperiosteal location, surrounded by solid periosteal bone formation. The lesion was excised en bloc and the histological diagnosis of a low-grade leiomyosarcoma was made. To the best of our knowledge, the surface location of primary bone leiomyosarcoma has not been previously described in the literature.
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keywords = tibia
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5/11. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to small bowel metastasis from leiomyosarcoma in the tibia.

    Small bowel metastasis from primary bone leiomyosarcoma is very rare. Here we report on a 50-year-old man who presented with general weakness, weight loss (six kg in two months) and intermittent tarry stools for two months. He had undergone an above-knee amputation for left tibia leiomyosarcoma seven years previously. No local recurrence and/or distant metastasis developed during a seven-year period of follow-up. Subsequent imaging study revealed a multilobulated mass in the ileum. He received segmental resection of the small bowel and a multilobulated mass was noted in the submucosal layer of the ileum with mucosa ulceration. His postoperative course was uneventful. Histopathological examination of the resected mass revealed small bowel metastatic leiomyosarcoma. No local recurrence or distant metastases were detected during a six-month follow-up period. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of small bowel metastasis from primary bone leiomyosarcoma presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.
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keywords = tibia
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6/11. Intestinal leiomyosarcoma following treatment of osteosarcoma in a teenage girl.

    A teenage girl is described who had an osteogenic sarcoma of the tibia at 11 years of age, a pulmonary metastasis at 13 years, and an intestinal leiomyosarcoma at 15 years. She remains well at the age of 18 years. leiomyosarcoma is extremely rare in children either as a primary or secondary tumor.
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7/11. Primary leiomyosarcoma of bone.

    We describe a primary leiomyosarcoma arising in the proximal part of the right tibia of a 65-year-old man. The diagnosis was confirmed by both histochemical and electron microscopical studies. Ultrastructural examination revealed two different neoplastic cell populations. One, the type 1 cell, resembled typical mature smooth muscle cells, whereas the type 2 cells were smaller, more pleomorphic, and contained thick myofilaments in addition to the characteristic thin actin-like filaments. The tumor most likely arose from vascular smooth muscle cells, although origin from perivascular, multipotential, mesenchymal cells cannot be ruled out. prognosis of reported cases appears to be poor if they are treated by inadequate surgical excision and irradiation but is more promising if wide excision or major amputation is performed.
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keywords = tibia
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8/11. Anaphylactoid reactions associated with ondansetron.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe two patients with anaphylactoid-type reactions to ondansetron. CASE SUMMARY: A 41-year-old man with grade III leiomyosarcoma of the right tibia was admitted to the hospital for his second dose of first-cycle neoadjuvant intraaterial cisplatin 60 mg/m2 therapy. He experienced an anaphylactoid reaction following intravenous ondansetron infusion that was confirmed on rechallenge. In a second case, premedication with intravenous ondansetron resulted in an anaphylactoid reaction in a 44-year-old woman with stage III ovarian cancer receiving her ninth course of cyclophosphamide and carboplatin. Both patients had received ondansetron previously with no adverse effects. DISCUSSION: Peer-reviewed journal articles and reports, obtained through a medline search, were reviewed. Information on the individual cases was obtained from the patients' medical records. Preservative changes in ondansetron infusion were examined as possible causes of the anaphylactoid reactions in our patients, but no conclusive data linking them were found. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy and safety of ondansetron has led to the widespread use of this medication in the treatment of nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Practitioners should be made aware that acute severe anaphylactoid reactions could occur in patients who have previously received ondansetron with no adverse effects.
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keywords = tibia
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9/11. Primary leiomyosarcoma affecting the ankle joint.

    In a 50-year-old patient with a malignant tumor of the left distal tibia (stage la, according to Enneking) undermining the cartilage of the ankle joint, an extremely rare primary leiomyosarcoma of bone was diagnosed. The diagnosis of a primary leiomyosarcoma of bone is possible only after a secondary (metastatic) leiomyosarcoma has been excluded. Furthermore, typical histopathological features, including immunohistochemical staining results, are required for the diagnosis. Surgery is the therapy of choice. An R0 resection should always be attempted.
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keywords = tibia
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10/11. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the bone and its comparison with fibrosarcoma.

    Two cases of primary leiomyosarcoma of the bone are recorded, one in the distal fibula of a 66-year-old man, the other in the proximal tibia of a 61-year-old woman. The cytological, histological, and ultrastructural features of leiomyosarcoma of bone are described and compared with those of fibrosarcoma. These features are sufficiently characteristic to enable a confident diagnostic distinction between leiomyosarcoma and fibrosarcoma. Nevertheless, certain basic similarities exist between these two tumors, manifested at the ultrastructural level by the presence of myofilaments in fibrosarcoma; it would seem that the observed differences relate to the degree of development of the myofilamentous structures. It is postulated that primary leiomyosarcoma of the bone need not necessarily always arise from the media of blood vessels; it might also conceivably develop through advanced myogenic metaplasia of a sarcoma originating from fibroblastic tissue.
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