Cases reported "Leishmaniasis, Cutaneous"

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11/143. South American cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids: report of five cases in Rio de Janeiro State, brazil.

    PURPOSE: To describe American cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids and highlight the main clinical and diagnostic features of lesions, which are rare in this location. DESIGN: Retrospective, noncomparative case series methods: Leishmanin skin test, touch preparations, histopathologic analysis, and culture in appropriate media were used for clinical confirmation and parasitologic diagnosis. Positive cultures were identified by the iso-enzymes technique. All patients were treated with pentavalent antimony applied intramuscularly. RESULTS: Leishmanin skin test was positive in all five patients. touch preparations, histopathologic analysis, and culture were performed in four patients. touch preparations were positive (presence of Leishman's bodies) in two patients; histopathologic analysis showed a granulomatous infiltrate in four patients and parasite was present in two patients; culture was positive in three patients, and in two the parasite was identified as Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Therapy was effective for all patients. CONCLUSIONS: Cutaneous leishmaniasis of the eyelids is uncommon in the americas. The disease may present diagnostic difficulties when appearing in nonendemic areas. The clues for diagnosis are the clinical aspect of lesions, the epidemiologic data, and a positive Leishmanin skin test. Demonstration of parasite is not always possible. Pentavalent antimonial compounds are the therapy of choice. Formerly, transmission of leishmaniasis occurred only when humans penetrated forested areas and became an incidental host. Now, eyelid lesions are part of the changing pattern in the transmission of the disease. With the increase in ecotourism, these lesions may begin to be seen in air travelers returning to other parts of the world.
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keywords = leishmaniasis, world
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12/143. Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis during highly active antiretroviral therapy in an AIDS patient infected with leishmania infantum.

    We report a case of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) in a woman with AIDS which occurred 13 months after a diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis concomitantly with immunological recovery induced by highly active retroviral therapy. Cytokine pattern at the time of visceral leishmaniasis and PKDL diagnosis was studied and pathogenic implications were discussed.
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ranking = 0.99999975759738
keywords = leishmaniasis
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13/143. Cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    The incidence of leishmaniasis is increasing globally due to population and environmental changes. Ease of worldwide travel and immigrant populations means that the UK surgeon is more likely to encounter cutaneous lesions. Two cases are presented and treatment options discussed.
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ranking = 0.71428578354361
keywords = leishmaniasis, world
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14/143. Recidivans cutaneous leishmaniasis unresponsive to liposomal amphotericin b (AmBisome).

    A 60-year-old woman with thick crusted erythematous plaques on her glabella, apex nasi and left infraorbital region was diagnosed as recidivans cutaneous leishmaniasis. The lesions were resistant to antimonial drugs. Although some response was observed on the infraorbital region, lesions on the glabella and nose continued to infiltrate despite therapy with liposomal amphotericin b.
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ranking = 0.71428554114098
keywords = leishmaniasis
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15/143. Cutaneous leishmaniasis following local trauma: a clinical pearl.

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is acquired from the bite of an infected sand fly and can result in chronic skin lesions that develop within weeks to months after a bite. Local trauma has been implicated as a precipitating event in the development of skin lesions in patients who have been infected with Leishmania species. Here we report a case series and review the literature on patients who developed cutaneous leishmaniasis after local trauma, which may familiarize clinicians with this presentation.
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ranking = 0.85714264936918
keywords = leishmaniasis
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16/143. Cutaneous leishmaniasis: a report of two cases seen at a tertiary dermatological centre in singapore.

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is not common in South-East asia and often presents as a granulomatous plaque on the exposed areas, with a high index of suspicion required for diagnosis. Two such cases were seen at the National Skin Centre recently, and both were Gurkha men with a history of travel to belize. They were treated with intravenous sodium stibogluconate with success. A discussion on CL and its management follows.
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ranking = 0.71428554114098
keywords = leishmaniasis
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17/143. Cutaneous leishmaniasis in an Italian woman: case report.

    leishmaniasis is a sandfly-borne disease caused by a protozoan. The typical lesion of cutaneous leishmaniasis first appears as an erythematous papule at the site of inoculation, increases slowly in size, develops raised borders, and eventually ulcerates. The pentavalent antimony compounds continue to be a mainstay of therapy. We describe an Italian patient with an enlarging facial plaque that was found to be caused by leishmania and discuss the toxicity associated with therapy.
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ranking = 0.71428554114098
keywords = leishmaniasis
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18/143. Competitive polymerase chain reaction used to diagnose cutaneous leishmaniasis in German soldiers infected during military exercises in french guiana.

    A competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by enzyme-linked-immunoassay-based verification of PCR products has been developed, which facilitated the diagnosis of leishmaniasis in two German soldiers who underwent survival training in the jungle of french guiana and returned with therapy-resistant pyoderma-like lesions. After treatment with liposomal amphotericin b, the skin manifestations disappeared, and leishmania dna could no longer be detected by PCR. In the context of growing military involvement in areas where leishmaniasis is prevalent, this assay may help detect or, due to its internal controls, exclude cases of infection with this parasite.
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ranking = 0.85714264936918
keywords = leishmaniasis
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19/143. leishmaniasis recidivans recurrence after 43 years: a clinical and immunologic report after successful treatment.

    We describe a patient with very late recurring leishmaniasis recidivans from whom lesional biopsy samples were obtained during and after topical steroid treatment that demonstrated the ability of the host to contain the parasite in the absence of therapy. Combination therapy with intralesional sodium stibogluconate and oral itraconazole was successful and immunologic data suggest that both CD4( ) and CD8( ) T cell subsets had roles in this disease process.
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ranking = 0.1428571082282
keywords = leishmaniasis
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20/143. A first case of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) lainsoni in bolivia.

    We present the first known case of cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania (Viannia) lainsoni detected in bolivia. The parasite was isolated from a young girl living in the subtropical region of Carrasco (900-1000 m above sea level, Caranavi Province, Department of La Paz, bolivia). The parasite identification was confirmed by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis.
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ranking = 0.71428554114098
keywords = leishmaniasis
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