Cases reported "Leishmaniasis"

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11/95. leishmaniasis in patients with chronic renal failure: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for the clinician.

    BACKGROUND: The role of leishmaniasis in dialyzed or transplanted patients for chronic renal failure is generally neglected. In this study, the authors present a series of three cases of leishmaniasis (one visceral, one mucous and one muco-visceral) in patients with end-stage renal failure characterized by an atypical presentation and/or resistance to therapy. CASE DESCRIPTION: Two patients had an atypical infection: the first patient demonstrated a mucosal form, while the second had visceral and mucosal involvement. These two presentations are very rare and, to the best of our knowledge, other autoctonous disease cases have never been described in italy. In the first patient, a cycle of oral itraconazole was scarcely effective and poorly tolerated, while treatment with 15% topical paromomycin sulfate was successful. patients two and three failed to respond to meglumine antimonate and amphotericin b lipid complex. A second cycle with liposomal amphotericin b was effective in both cases. In addition, a superior safety profile for liposomal amphotericin b in comparison with the lipid complex amphotericin b was observed. CONCLUSIONS: These three cases highlight the problem of leishmaniasis in both renal transplanted and dialyzed patients and suggest that this infection could be far from infrequent in addition to being resistant to therapies. leishmaniasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of fevers of unknown origin and mucosal lesions in these patients, even in countries not at risk for mucosal leishmaniasis.
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12/95. Case report: myiasis--the botfly boil.

    Cutaneous furunculoid myiasis arises from the infestation of skin or mucous membranes with dipterous larvae. myiasis from the botfly Dermatobia hominis is a common parasitic disease of the tropics of Central and south america, and may present in the united states. With increasing travel by U.S. citizens, there is potential for increased occurrence; it is important to be able to accurately diagnose myiasis and differentiate it from entities with similar presentations, such as leishmaniasis. The authors describe four cases of myiasis from D. hominis infestation and review clinical features, differential diagnosis, and treatment.
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13/95. Nexus of infection with human immunodeficiency virus, pulmonary tuberculosis and visceral leishmaniasis: a case report from Bihar, india.

    A 37-year-old man was diagnosed as being infected with human immunodeficiency virus (hiv), tuberculosis (TB), tuberculoma of the brain, and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) at the Rajendra Memorial Institute of Medical Sciences in Bihar, india. He had taken anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT) for two and a half months and had episodes of convulsions with loss of consciousness, tongue bites, and incontinence of urine. The results of a neurologic examination were normal except for a left plantar extensor. He was positive for both hiv-I (confirmed by Western blot) and VL (confirmed by splenic aspirate). Treatment was initiated with amphotericin b lipid complex, a four-drug regimen (rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide) of ATT, highly active antiretroviral therapy, anti-convulsants, and other supportive therapies. A repeat computed tomography scan of the brain showed the disappearance of the lesion followed by gliosis. After six months, he was also cured of VL. The triad of infections (hiv, VL, and TB) is a real threat in Bihar as an emerging combination of diseases of public health importance. Keeping these facts in mind, efforts to develop simple and cost effective diagnostic techniques coupled with affordable therapeutic facilities are urgently needed in developing countries.
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keywords = leishmaniasis
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14/95. A rare case of localized mucosal leishmaniasis due to leishmania infantum in an immunocompetent Italian host.

    The case of authoctonous isolated laryngeal leishmaniasis due to L. infantum in an italian immunocompetent host is reported. It is highlighed the need to consider mucosal leishmaniasis in the differential diagnosis of laryngeal tumors. Rapid nested-PCR technique and enzyme restriction analysis were useful for diagnosis and species identification directly from bioptic samples.
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15/95. Isolated lingual leishmaniasis.

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic in Fars Province, southern iran. However, mucosal leishmaniasis is extremely uncommon. Herein, we report a patient with isolated lingual leishmaniasis in an immunocompetent 40-year-old man. The lesion was totally excised. The patient was cured completely and is doing well after four years of follow-up, with no medical treatment.
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16/95. Characterization of Leishmania colombiensis sp. n (kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae), a new parasite infecting humans, animals, and phlebotomine sand flies in colombia and panama.

    Characterization of Leishmania colombiensis sp.n. is presented, which on the basis of biological and molecular criteria, appears to be a new member of the L. braziliensis complex. A total of nine isolates of the new parasite were made in colombia and panama between 1980 and 1986: two from human cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis, six from phlebotomine sand flies, and one from a sloth. Although most closely related to L. lainsoni, L. colombiensis sp.n. is clearly distinguishable from other members of the genus by its reactivity with monoclonal antibodies, isoenzyme electrophoresis, and restriction endonuclease fragment patterns of kinetoplast dna (k-dna).
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17/95. Leishmania infection in a 51-year-old woman with sarcoidosis: case report.

    patients with sarcoidosis are at risk of opportunistic infections both from the sarcoidosis itself and from steroid therapy. Steroid therapy by reducing cell-mediated immunity increases the risk of infection with intracellular organisms. We present a case of Leishmania infection in a 51-year-old Italian woman receiving prednisone for sarcoidosis. The patient lives in Liguria, a region in the northwest of italy that is considered highly endemic for leishmaniasis. We would postulate that even though leishmaniasis is seen relatively infrequently in connection with sarcoidosis, the occurrence of this opportunistic infection is possible in patients living in areas endemic for such protozoa.
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18/95. A case of complicated anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis in Al Baha, saudi arabia.

    A complicated case of ACL, which showed feverish and widely disseminated ulcers over the face was successfully treated with systemic antibiotic and pentostam as intralesional injections.
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19/95. Treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis using a carbon dioxide laser.

    Use of a carbon dioxide laser to vaporize the local lesions caused by cutaneous leishmaniasis is reported. A total of 108 patients have been treated in this way and followed up. The treatment reduces the management time of patients at least 1.5 times and is followed by satisfactory aesthetic outcomes. No recurrences have been observed among the 82 patients who have been followed up for 7 years.
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ranking = 1.25
keywords = leishmaniasis
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20/95. Post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis simulating leprosy. (A case report).

    The case of a 40 years male suffering from post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis simulating nodular lepromatous leprosy is reported. In countries where leprosy is endemic, other diseases are not infrequently taken to be leprosy (Schaller, 1971). Dermal leishmaniasis is a common cause of confusion in countries where the condition is endemic (Browne, 1964). Dharmendra and Chatterji (1940) discussed in detail the question of differential diagnosis between leprosy and Dermal leishmaniasis. The present communication is concerned with a patient suffering from post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis whose skin lesions simulated nodular lepromatous leprosy.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = leishmaniasis
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