Cases reported "Leukemia, Lymphoid"

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1/4. Fishbone perforation through a Meckel's diverticulum: a rare laparoscopic diagnosis in acute abdominal pain.

    The use of diagnostic laparoscopy in acute abdominal pain, especially when patients have been admitted for acute pain in the lower abdominal quadrants, improves the accuracy of diagnosis and leads to improvements in treatment procedures. A case is reported of a 24-year-old woman admitted under suspicion of appendicitis. The appendix was found to be normal, and a perforation caused by a fishbone was discovered in a Meckel's diverticulum. The diverticulum was resected by a combined laparoscopic and open procedure. Diagnostic laparoscopy should be performed routinely in cases of acute abdominal pain in the lower quadrants of suspected appendiceal origin to avoid overlooking other causes of the symptoms.
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2/4. Perforation of Meckel's diverticulum by a chicken bone, a rare complication: report of a case.

    A perforation of Meckel's diverticulum by foreign bodies is an extremely rare cause of acute abdomen in adults. We herein present a case of a 30-year-old man who was admitted due to symptoms of right lower quadrant pain, anorexia, and vomiting. An exploratory laparotomy was done, and a perforated Meckel's diverticulum due to a chicken bone was found at exploration. A resection of a segment of ileum including the perforated diverticulum was performed, and the patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course.
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3/4. intestinal obstruction at the onset of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a child.

    Surgical complications need not be fatal in acute leukemia. If these are promptly diagnosed and properly treated, the prognosis will improve. This report deals with a case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting with an acute abdomen following surgery for choledochal cyst. A peripheral blood smear and examination of the bone marrow revealed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The child received transfusions of blood and platelets. Pretreatment with prednisolone was started as therapy for leukemia, and 2 days later, the patient underwent surgery. Therapy was continued until the general condition allowed a more aggressive form of treatment. Complete remission was achieved, and the patient is still in good health 48 months after diagnosis and 15 months after discontinuation of treatment. The favorable outcome in this child shows that prompt surgery is sometimes an essential step in the treatment of childhood leukemia.
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4/4. pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis with abdominal free air in a 2-year-old girl after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    A 2-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) showing a t(4;11)(q21;q23) karyotype underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with the conditioning regimen of L-PAM (70 mg/m2/d for 3 days), busulfan (140 mg/m2/d for 2 days), and total body irradiation (12 Gy). On day 57, the patient developed pneumatosis cystoides intestinalis (PCI) when she received cyclosporin A and corticosteroids for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Because of the presence of massive abdominal free air and the suspicion of peritonitis, she underwent surgical intervention, which, however, revealed neither intestinal perforation nor peritoneal infection. She recovered from PCI in 10 days with nasogastric suction, fasting, and systemic broad-spectrum antibiotics. PCI with massive abdominal free air after BMT should be manageable by conservative therapy alone.
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