Cases reported "Leukoplakia, Oral"

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1/4. Shammah-induced oral leukoplakia-like lesions.

    A Shammah-induced oral leukoplakia-like lesion is described in a 44-year-old Algerian patient, who used this specific chewing tobacco since 33 years. The extended white lesion was located to the right mandibular vestibule and had a homogeneous appearance. Shammah is a chewing tobacco consisting of powdered tobacco leaves with carbonate of lime and other substances. It has been associated with oral cancer in saudi arabia. Histologically, acanthosis, hyperortho- and parakeratosis were seen. The spinous cell layer showed large pale staining epithelial cells with pycnotic nuclei. Atypia was not observed, however, an increase in mitotic activity was apparent. The subepithelial infiltrate was mild. Electron microscopy showed changes in the basal membrane with interruptions, duplications and triplications. Follow-up of the patient for 2 years revealed that, whenever, the patient changed the location of application, the white lesion regressed or disappeared within 4-6 weeks. Due to the composition of Shammah, the lesion induced has features of a mucosal burn. In contrast to other smokeless tobacco variants, Shammah seems to cause changes which, according to the small number of reports, may transform into oral cancer. As such, Shammah-induced oral leukoplakia-like lesions may be considered precancerous.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tobacco
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2/4. Detecting oral cancer: a new technique and case reports.

    The VELscope is an important aid in patient assessment, and when added to a well-thought out clinical assessment process that takes into consideration the age of the patient and risk factors that include tobacco, alcohol, and immunologic status, it increases the clinician's ability to detect oral changes that may represent premalignant or malignant cellular transformation. False positive findings are possible in the presence of highly inflamed lesions, and it is possible that use of the scope alone may result in failure to detect regions of dysplasia, but it has been our experience that use of the VELscope improves clinical decision making about the nature of oral lesions and aids in decisions to biopsy regions of concern. Where tissue changes are generalized or cover significant areas of the mouth, use of the scope has allowed us to identify the best region for biopsy. As with all clinical diagnostic activities, no single system or process is enough, and all clinicians are advised to use good clinical practice to assess patients and to recall and biopsy lesions that do not resolve within a predetermined time frame. Lesions that are VELscope-positive and absorb light need to be followed with particular caution, and if they do not resolve within a 2-week period, then further assessment and biopsy are generally advised. It is much better to occasionally sample tissue that turns out to be benign than to fail to diagnose dysplastic or malignant lesions. In our fight to protect patients from cancer, the VELscope improves our odds for early detection, hopefully resulting in fewer deaths from oral cancer.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = tobacco
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3/4. Intraoral leukoplakia, abrasion, periodontal breakdown, and tooth loss in a snuff dipper.

    dentists should be aware that snuff dipping or chewing is increasing in southern states and perhaps in other sections of the united states. These habits can lead to clinical leukoplakia, gingival recession, tooth abrasion, and periodontal bone destruction. The possibility also exists that a malignant transformation of leukoplakia can develop in persons who use snuff and other forms of tobacco.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = tobacco
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4/4. The reversibility of leukoplakia caused by smokeless tobacco.

    This case describes an instance of reversibility of bilateral mucosal leukoplakic lesions caused by the long-term use of smokeless tobacco. The dentist should recognize the lesion, advise the patient to stop the tobacco usage, observe the reversibility of the lesion, and assist the patient in stopping the tobacco habit permanently.
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ranking = 1.75
keywords = tobacco
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