Cases reported "Lip Diseases"

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1/53. Acute angioneurotic edema of the lips and tongue due to emotional stress.

    Angioneurotic edema, though a fairly common medical condition, is rarely seen in dental practice. As laryngeal involvement can occur spontaneously and suddenly in the dental office or a similar complication can develop abruptly after administration of certain drugs used in dentistry, an understanding of this condition is definitely indicated. Moreover, as the hereditary form of this clinical entity can be precipitated by trauma, such as various dental and oral surgical procedures with a high incidence of laryngeal edema, an awareness of this phenomenon is an absolute necessity for sound medical and dental practice.
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2/53. Anaesthesia of the right lower hemilip as a first manifestation of multiple myeloma. Presentation of a clinical case.

    multiple myeloma is a malignant proliferation of plasma cells. It may affect any of various bones, causing osteolytic lesions with a characteristic "punched out" radiographic appearance. The commonest symptom is bone pain. One of the most frequent locations is the mandible. Symptoms of multiple myeloma of the mandible include tumefaction, non-specific pain, tooth mobility and sometimes loss, and paraesthesia of the dental nerve. Here we report a case of multiple myeloma of the mandible which was unusual in that the presenting complaint was anaesthesia of the right lower hemilip.
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3/53. Localized scleroderma in a 12-year-old girl presenting as gingival recession. A case report and literature review.

    Scleroderma is a connective tissue disorder that displays considerable clinical heterogeneity. This case describes a 12-year-old girl who presented with a localized form of the disease. The consequences were a severe and progressive localized gingival recession affecting two maxillary incisors, a localized lip defect and scarring of the forehead. The case illustrates the difficulties in diagnosis and management of young patients with localized scleroderma.
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ranking = 4.3416133340243
keywords = gingival
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4/53. Influence of galvanic phenomena on the occurrence of algic symptoms in the mouth.

    The presence of more than one dental alloy in the oral cavity often causes pathological galvanic currents and voltage. Due to various and multi-faceted symptomathology, they tend to be a source of significant problems not only for the patient but also for the attending dentist. Very discreet and uncharacteristically objective diagnosis during a regular examination frequently causes this state to be ascribed to a completely different illness.
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5/53. Upper lip fistulas: three new cases.

    OBJECTIVE: We present three new cases of congenital upper lip fistula. Two of them were located in the philtrum midline, one of which was associated to a double maxillary frenulum, a medial lip cleft, and a medial cleft of the primitive palate. The other was located in the left side of the vermilion. All three patients had clear fluid discharge through the fistulous orifice without pain. Two of them had a history of recurrent swelling of the philtrum area. CONCLUSIONS: A simple surgical excision is the treatment of choice in these cases, in which the anatomy is preserved; this fact is more consistent with a completed but aberrant development than with focal dysgenesis.
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ranking = 1.3960755144554
keywords = fistula
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6/53. Acute streptococcal infection of the gingiva, lower lip, and pharynx--a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcal gingivostomatitis is a rare phenomenon in a non-compromised host and not commonly reported in the dental literature. early diagnosis and distinction from viral infections, especially HSV infection, are of the utmost importance. The early use of penicillin is essential in preventing a cascade of events, resulting in severe fasciitis, destruction of tissues, and subsequent rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. methods: A unique case of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal infection affecting the pharynx, lower lip, and gingiva of a healthy 19-year-old male is presented. RESULTS: The streptococcal infection was responsive to penicillin treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In view of the increased use of antibiotics and the development of aggressive strains, the dental clinician has to consider streptococcal infection in the differential diagnosis of gingival and soft tissue infections.
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ranking = 1.3683226668049
keywords = gingival, dental
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7/53. Delayed onset of altered sensation following dental implant placement and mental block local anesthesia: a case report.

    A case of a delayed-onset post-operative altered sensation of the mental nerve is reported with speculations as to etiology. There is a discussion concerning intraoperative radiographs and osteotomy positioning. When postoperative altered sensation occurs, etiologic considerations should always include local anesthetic administration technique. The importance of pulp testing from the first molar to the contralateral lateral incisor is key to determining whether the deficit is in the mandibular nerve or only the mental nerve, which may be a result of mental block local anesthetic administration and not implant placement. This differentiation may be important in treatment and/or legal exposure. The altered sensation was probably caused by the mental block anesthetic technique. The partial anesthetic area in this case was probably a result of crossover innervation from the contralateral mental nerve.
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8/53. condylomata acuminata in a boy.

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomaviruses, or HPV, are etiologic agents of all types of warts, including those associated with sexual transmission. Although previously rare in children, condylomata acuminata in the mouth have been reported for the past 10 to 15 years, and the possibility of sexual abuse needs to be considered. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 4-year-old boy with poor dental health presented with a wartlike mass on his upper lip, as well as two similar penile lesions. The lesions, cauliflowerlike and pedunculated in appearance, were excised, underwent biopsies and were subtyped via in situ hybridization. All of the lesions tested positive for HPV subtypes 6 and 11, which are the subtypes most often associated with anogenital warts (condylomata acuminata). Although both parents reported having genital warts, the specific mode of transmission to the child was not determined. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Cases of oral condylomata acuminata in children need to be treated as possible instances of sexual abuse, and it is incumbent on the dentist to alert the appropriate community agency for follow-up.
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keywords = dental
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9/53. Contact orofacial granulomatosis caused by delayed hypersensitivity to gold and mercury.

    Orofacial granulomatosis, an entity with characteristic clinicopathologic features, is thought to be a reactive process. The authors describe orofacial granulomatosis associated with contact allergy to gold in dental crowns in one patient and a possible allergic contact reaction to mercury from dental fillings in another one. Thus allergic contact dermatitis to the metals gold and mercury should be considered as a possible etiologic agent of orofacial granulomatosis.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = dental
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10/53. angioedema of the lips and tongue induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. A report of two cases.

    The following case reports describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of two patients who attended Liverpool University Dental Hospital with rapidly increasing swelling of the lips and tongue. Both patients were suffering from angioedema and were taking an angiotension-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (ACEI). A provisional diagnosis of ACEI-induced angioedema was made. An intramuscular injection of chlorpheniramine maleate was given to both patients and they were immediately transferred to the local accident and emergency department. These cases illustrate the potential role of the general dental practitioner in the early recognition and management of this potentially life-threatening condition.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = dental
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