Cases reported "Lipoma"

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1/111. Giant lipoma of the larynx: a case report and literature review.

    Fewer than 15% of lipomas occur in the head and neck. To date, fewer than 100 cases of laryngeal lipoma have been reported in the literature. Typical clinical manifestations include dysphagia, dyspnea and hoarseness, as well as the presence of a smooth or pedunculated mass seen endoscopically and a low attenuation mass on computed tomography scan. Pathologic sections commonly reveal a tumor consisting of mature adipocytes, which is often encapsulated. Treatment of laryngeal lipoma varies from conservative total endoscopic removal to external surgical approaches. The following is a report of a single case of laryngeal lipoma, including pathologic and radiologic findings, as well as a review of the literature.
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keywords = neck
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2/111. Infiltrating lipoma of the head and neck: a report of one pediatric case.

    Infiltrating lipomas are rare benign tumors. Several cases have previously been reported in the oral cavity but only three cases have been reported to date in children. We report a case of a 7-year-old child with an infiltrating lipoma of the neck and a posterior extension to the fourth and fifth cervical roots and the vertebral artery. The absence of any neurological signs, negative clinical and radiological examination results, as well as, the surgical risk of total removal and high rate of recurrence suggested a period of watchful waiting. After 5 years, the patient's clinical and radiological characteristics remain stable. A review of the literature regarding this pathology in the head and neck area, in both children and adults is also presented.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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3/111. Giant cervico-mediastinal lipoma. A clinical case.

    The lipoma is a circumscribed mesenchymal tumour originating from adipose tissue. The lesion is usually small and asymptomatic, and is most frequently located in the neck region. The case of a 77-year-old woman with chronic extrasystolic arrhythmia caused by a non-specified ischemic cardiopathy is reported. The woman presented a swelling at the front of her neck, observed for the first time about 6 months previously. This swelling progressively increased in size, provoking dysphagia, dysphonia, persistent cough, dyspnea, light jugular turgor and palpitations. Chest x-rays showed and opaque area at the front of the neck, which extended beyond the jugular incisure by about 2 cm. NMR of the neck showed a gross lipomatous formation at the front, mainly of the left, continuing in the front mediastinal region; the trachea was dislocated to the right and compressed at the back; the vasculo-nervous fasciculus, especially on the left, was compressed and enveloped by the adipose formation. The Holter test confirmed the presence of ventricular and supra-ventricular extrasystoles. Surgery was carried out under local anaesthesia because the displacement of the laryngo-tracheal axes precluded intubation. Histological analysis of the 9 x 4 x 2.2 cm mass confirmed the diagnosis of lipoma. After removal of the mass all the symptoms, which had been provoked by compression, as well as the cardiac arrhythmias disappeared. The prompt disappearance of the latter was particularly surprising. The possibility of the external compression of the nervous structures of the neck should be taken into consideration in cases of ventricular arrhythmia of unknown origin, and systematic study of the region carried out.
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ranking = 5
keywords = neck
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4/111. Benign recurring lipoblastoma in an adult versus well differentiated subcutaneous myxoid liposarcoma: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of a unique case.

    Subcutaneous myxoid liposarcoma (ML) is exceedingly rare, with only two or three cases having been reported. lipoblastoma (LB), a rare fatty tumor that arises in infants and children, is unknown after adolescence. In contrast to ML, LB is often superficial. The two tumors can be difficult to distinguish due to many histologic similarities. We examined a 0.9 cm superficial subcutaneous nodule from the dorsal neck of a 48 year old man that had been growing slowly. Three and one half years later, a 0.4 cm palpable recurrent nodule was excised from the scar. The patient is now free of disease at 7.5 years. Because of these unusual features, we performed clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of this unusual tumor to decide if this represented a rare cutaneous ML or an unprecedented example of LB in an adult. The primary featured a thick fibrous pseudocapsule with foci of lymphocytes and infiltrating nests of semi-mature fetal-appearing adipocytic tissue. This surrounded a more immature cellular-but-cytologically-bland myxoid tissue featuring stellate cells and signet lipoblasts. There were fibrous sep at the periphery and the vasculature was rather inconspicuous. The 0.4 cm diameter recurrence was distinctly lobular and had minute satellite nodules. It was composed of uniform fetal-appearing bland myxoid lipoblastic tissue featuring signet ring lipoblasts surrounded by a few spindle cells. In both tumors, lipoblasts expressed S-100 protein. In the primary, 5% of the lesional cells were FXIIIa dendritic stromal histiocytes while in the recurrence, 15% of the lesional cells were FXIIIa dendritic cells. CD34 stained only scattered small capillaries. The Ki67 proliferation index was 1% in the primary and 3% in the recurrence. RT-PCR assay for TLS/FUS-CHOP fusion transcripts was negative despite three repeat tests performed on paraffin sections of the primary tumor in the presence of good m-rna internal controls. We reviewed the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of ML and LB. Based on this review and on the growth pattern, anatomic features and molecular data from the present case, we conclude that this tumor may represent the first reported case of adult LB.
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keywords = neck
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5/111. Pleomorphic lipoma: case report and literature review.

    BACKGROUND: Pleomorphic lipoma is a rare, benign, pseudosarcomatous, soft tissue neoplasm typically involving the subcutis of the neck and shoulder in middle-aged to elderly men. It is characterized histologically by atypical, multinucleated giant cells and grossly as a well-circumscribed mass. Since this neoplasm can resemble a sarcoma, histopathologic diagnosis is critical in preventing unnecessary surgery. OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of pleomorphic lipoma in the neck and to review the clinical and histopathologic characteristics of this neoplasm. methods: We present a case report and review of the literature. RESULTS: Local excision to completely extirpate this neoplasm has proven curative at 10 months of follow-up. CONCLUSION: Pleomorphic lipoma is superficially located and may be encountered in a dermatologic setting. Thus the dermatologist should become familiar with its clinical presentation and microscopic appearance.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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6/111. Infiltrating angiolipoma of the M. temporalis.

    Angiolipomas are rare benign mesenchymal tumours that are distinguished from common lipomas by a marked degree of vascularisation. They are differentiated into non-infiltrating and the even less frequent infiltrating angiolipomas. The present case is the 9th report of an infiltrating angiolipoma of the head and neck. The patient was a 63-year-old man with an infiltrating angiolipoma of the left M. temporalis. Microscopic examination showed univacuolated adipose cells mixed with capillaries invading skeletal muscle. The patient has been free of recurrence since excision of the tumor.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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7/111. Ossifying lipoma independent of bone tissue.

    A 46-year-old Japanese male was referred to a local hospital because of a firm, nontender mass on his neck. On physical examination, the tumor was soft, well demarcated, 3 x 2 cm in size and located in the submucosal region. It was entirely separate from the vertebrae. The resected tumor was shown to be a lipoma with focal ossification. Ossifying lipomas are rare, and the cases which are independent of bone even more so. A literature review revealed that ossifying lipoma independent of bone tissue has been reported in only 8 cases, and, interestingly, all of them occurred in the head and neck region.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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8/111. Neural fibrolipoma: an unusual case.

    A 45-year-old gentleman presented with a diffuse left neck mass. Surgical exploration revealed a large lipomatous lesion. Histological examination identified this to be a neural fibrolipoma. This is the first reported case of this lesion in the neck.
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ranking = 2
keywords = neck
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9/111. lipoblastoma of the neck.

    lipoblastoma and lipoblastomatosis are benign tumours arising from embryonal fat cells. These rare tumours essentially occur in infancy and early childhood. The males are affected more than females often in the ratio of 3:1. These tumours usually arise in extremities. The involvement of neck is rare with only 10 cases reported so far in English literature. We herein report lipoblastoma of the neck in a 3 year old girl.
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ranking = 6
keywords = neck
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10/111. Diagnostic pitfalls in fine needle aspiration cytology of pleomorphic lipoma. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Pleomorphic lipoma is an unusual pseudosarcomatous condition with characteristic morphology. Despite its pleomorphic appearance, it follows a benign course and does not recur or metastasize if completely excised. CASE: A 66-year-old man presented with swelling in the back of the neck of approximately six months' duration. The focally cellular aspirate revealed round to oval, hyperchromatic cells, rare multinucleated cells and fragments of mature adipose tissue. On initial evaluation, the smear pattern suggested a malignant neoplasm. However, upon review of the cytologic material along with histology, the characteristic pattern, including floret cells, was recognized. CONCLUSION: The rarity of pleomorphic lipoma and the atypical cellular features of the aspirate can cause difficulty in diagnosing this entity. awareness of this rare but not-uncommon entity, along with clinical correlation, is crucial in arriving at the correct diagnosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = neck
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