Cases reported "Liver Diseases"

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1/125. Isolated polycystic liver disease not linked to polycystic kidney disease 1 and 2.

    Autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease occurs commonly in association with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, types 1 and 2. It may also exist as a separate entity, genetically distinct from autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease types 1 and 2, as has been recently established to exist in a Belgian family. We report here a large Argentinian family of Spanish-Belgian ancestry with autosomal dominant polycystic liver disease, where proximal and distal markers for both polycystic kidney disease 1 and 2 failed to demonstrate genetic linkage. The data support the notion that polycystic liver disease and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease may have separate chromosomal loci.
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ranking = 1
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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2/125. Striking cholestatic liver disease: a distinct manifestation of advanced primary amyloidosis.

    In patients with systemic amyloidosis, amyloid fibrils are typically deposited in numerous organs, including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Although amyloid deposition in the liver is common in patients with systemic amyloidosis, clinical liver disease is relatively rare. The patient described here had cholestatic liver disease as the primary manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis. review of the literature suggests that prominent liver disease with cholestasis is unusual but probably underreported in patients with amyloidosis and appears to be restricted to patients with the primary form of amyloidosis. Nonetheless, cholestatic hepatic amyloidosis is characterized by distinct clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features; recognition of this process is critical because it identifies patients with widespread organ involvement and portends a poor prognosis.
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ranking = 0.00094624600444147
keywords = kidney
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3/125. Fibropolycystic disease of the hepatobiliary system and kidneys.

    This complicated case of fibropolycystic disease of the hepatobiliary system and kidneys was ably and incisively analyzed by Professor Sheila Sherlock. Her clinical acumen was revealed by her ability to differentiate congenital hepatic fibrosis, Caroli's disease, and adult polycystic disease of the liver and kidney. Interesting histologic features of this case included hepatic fibrosis with intact limiting plates anc central veins and the presence of bile plugs in the ducts, but the absence of bile statsis in the parenchyma. A percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram demonstrated the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts. Washing out the "gunk" from the biliary tract by T-tube drainage has great limitations in this type of case. Therefore, Dr. Adson suggested irrigation of the biliary ductal system using tubed placed transhepatically, plus a wide choledojejunostomy. Dr. Sherlock questioned this surgical approach. The use of chenodeoxycholic acid for this "gunk" was suggested. In spite of the dilated ducts and pathologic changes in the liver, the patient was not jandiced and did not have stones in her biliary tract. The genetics of this patient's problems was discussed.
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ranking = 0.0056774760266488
keywords = kidney
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4/125. Portal hypertension due to extensive hepatic cysts in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Liver cysts are a well-recognized feature of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and occur in 77% of patients more than 60 years old. Serious sequelae, however, are rare, the two most common complications being pain and cyst infections. Portal hypertension has been reported in ADPKD due to the rare presence of congenital hepatic fibrosis. We report a case of ADPKD in a patient who had portal hypertension due to distortion of portal vein and venules by extensive hepatic cysts.
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ranking = 0.625
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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5/125. Neonatal detection and evaluation of infantile polycystic disease by gray scale echography.

    Infantile polycystic disease (IPCD) is an uncommon pathologic entity involving the kidneys and liver. Gray scale echography can detect this pathologic process within the kidneys, despite the presence of renal failure. In addition, the sonic study may detect associated hepatic abnormalities even though isotopic liver scan is normal. These capabilities make the ultrasonic examination uniquely suited for evaluating patients with IPCD.
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ranking = 0.0018924920088829
keywords = kidney
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6/125. Sonographic pattern of recessive polycystic kidney disease in young adults. Differences from the dominant form.

    BACKGROUND: To study the sonographic pattern of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) in early adulthood in order to identify imaging criteria to diagnose this disease and to distinguish between recessive and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) in that age group. methods: An abdominal ultrasound was performed on four ARPKD subjects (with a mean age of 20.2) and on 33 ADPKD subjects in early adulthood (29 without renal failure with a mean age of 20.5, and four with renal failure with a mean age of 26.5). Linkage studies with ADPKD and ARPKD markers were compatible with the clinical diagnosis in all cases. RESULTS: The renal sonographic features in ARPKD subjects included multiple small cysts in a normal-sized kidney, increased cortical echogenicity and loss of corticomedullary differentiation. In ADPKD subjects without renal failure, sonographic features included few or multiple cysts of different sizes, in normal-sized kidneys in 22 out of 29 patients (75.8%), normal cortical echogenicity and conserved corticomedullary differentiation, except in patients with nephromegaly. All ADPKD subjects with renal failure had nephromegaly and loss of corticomedullary differentiation. The hepatic sonographic features in ARPKD patients included portal fibrosis and in some cases Caroli's disease, while in ADPKD patients a normal hepatic echostructure was detected in all but one case, in addition to simple hepatic cysts in a few cases. CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation of the sonographic features of the kidneys and those of the liver may help in the differential diagnosis between ARPKD and ADPKD in early adulthood.
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ranking = 0.75283873801332
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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7/125. Congenital generalized infantile myofibromatosis and neonatal hemochromatosis. An autopsy case report.

    An autopsy case of congenital infantile myofibromatosis and neonatal hemochromatosis is reported. A thirty-six-hour-old baby girl had multiple subcutaneous nodules in addition to multiple visceral involvement of heart, lungs, pharynx, larynx, stomach, small bowel, large bowel, pancreas, kidneys, spleen, thyroid, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, peripheral nerves, meninges and soft tissues. In these tumoral nodules, three types of histological patterns were observed: 1-hemangiopericytoma-like, 2-mixed, and 3-pure spindle cell. Tumor cells were immunohistochemically positive for actin, and negative for desmin, muscle-specific antigen, and estrogen, related protein. The histological and immunohistochemical findings of the case suggested that a close relationship may exist between infantile myofibromatosis and infantile hemangiopericytoma. In addition to infantile myofibromatosis, neonatal hemochromatosis characterized by iron deposition in parenchymatous organs such as liver, pancreas, lungs, thyroid, and adrenal glands was another important characteristic of the case.
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ranking = 0.00094624600444147
keywords = kidney
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8/125. A case of successful management of portosystemic shunt with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease by balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration and partial splenic embolization.

    We describe a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease who was successfully managed for severe abdominal distension, impaired liver function and a portosystemic shunt by interventional therapies. The patient's intra-hepatic portal vein was compressed and narrowed by multiple liver cysts, which resulted in a decrease of the portal blood flow and portal hypertension due to a huge gastro-renal shunt These haemodynamic changes were assumed to contribute to insufficient protein synthesis in the liver. Therefore, we first repeatedly performed minocycline hydrochloride instillations to treat the multiple liver cysts. Then, we conducted a partial splenic embolization to prevent elevation of the portal vein pressure prior to balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration which was performed to increase the portal blood flow. The portal blood flow markedly increased, and protein synthesis in the liver also recovered and the clinical symptoms improved. The patient has been monitored for more than two years up to the present and her liver function parameters have remained within the normal range. renal insufficiency is known to be a major prognostic factor in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. In some cases, however, liver involvement with multiple cysts may result in a fatal outcome. In such cases, interventional therapies, as provided to this patient, should be considered.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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9/125. Hepatic amyloidosis with light chain deposition disease. A rare association.

    Monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition diseases are due to pathological protein deposition in various tissues and organs. Protein deposits may be found in a single tissue or systemically and the organs most frequently involved are kidney, heart, peripheral nerves and the liver. Depending on the pattern of the deposits and the type of immunoglobulin, these diseases are distinguished as primary amyloidosis, light chain deposition disease. Differential diagnosis is made in tissue specimens: microscopically by the identification of positive congo red staining of the deposits, by immunohistochemical demonstration of proteins reacting with light chain (lambda or kappa) antisera or by recognition of fibrillar structures on electron microscopy. We report an unusual case of light chain deposition disease associated with amyloidosis, where hepatomegaly was the presenting manifestation and liver failure the cause of death, without any kidney involvement.
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ranking = 0.0018924920088829
keywords = kidney
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10/125. Successful living donor liver transplantation for polycystic liver in a patient with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Orthotopic liver transplantation has been recommended for patients with disabling polycystic liver disease (PCLD). Because of the shortage of cadaveric donors, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) has been developed as an alternative. We describe the case of a woman with PCLD as an extrarenal manifestation of autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) who was successfully palliated by LDLT. The patient was a 48-year-old woman with abdominal distention. Computed tomography showed a massively enlarged liver containing innumerable cysts, as well as bilateral kidney cysts. Hepatic and renal functions were well preserved. Genetic analysis of the family did not exclude linkage to the PKD1 locus. Two and a half years after the first examination, the patient reported severely disabling symptoms caused by the PCLD. Living donor liver transplantation was performed using a right-lobe graft. The recipient and donor were both well 8 months after the transplantation. The excised liver weighed 7.4 kg, and the histopathology revealed multiple cysts and von Meyenburg complexes in the portal areas.
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ranking = 0.62594624600444
keywords = kidney disease, kidney
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