Cases reported "Liver Diseases"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/1415. Delayed hemorrhage after nonoperative management of blunt hepatic trauma in children: a rare but significant event.

    PURPOSE: Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic injury (BHI) has become widely accepted in hemodynamically stable children without ongoing transfusion requirements. However, late hemorrhage, especially after discharge from the hospital can be devastating. The authors report the occurrence of serious late hemorrhage and the sentinel signs and symptoms in children at risk for this complication. methods: Nonoperative management of hemodynamically stable children included computed tomography (CT) evaluation on admission and hospitalization with bed rest for 7 days, regardless of injury grade. Activity was restricted for 3 months after discharge. Hepatic injuries were classified according to grade, amount of hemoperitoneum, and periportal hypoattenuation. RESULTS: Over 5 years, nonoperative management was successful in 74 of 75 children. One child returned to the hospital 3 days after discharge with recurrent hemorrhage necessitating surgical control. review of the CT findings demonstrated that he was the only child with severe liver injury in all four classifications. A second child, initially treated at an outside hospital, presented 10 days after injury with ongoing bleeding and died despite surgical intervention. Only the two children with delayed bleeding had persistent right abdominal and shoulder discomfort in the week after BHI. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support nonoperative management of BHI. However, late hemorrhage heralded by persistence of right abdominal and shoulder pain may occur in children with severe hepatic trauma and high injury severity scores in multiple classifications.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/1415. Ferumoxide-enhanced MRI of sideronecrosis superimposed on genetic hemochromatosis.

    Genetic hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by excessive iron absorption from the gut, resulting in increased total body iron stores, multisystem organ dysfunction, and an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. The magnetic susceptibility effects of excess hepatocellular iron generally cause diffuse hepatic signal loss on T2- or T2*-weighted MR images. Although hepatic iron deposition is usually diffuse, focal areas of iron sparing can occur, and, when present, superimposed neoplasm is a consideration. We describe a patient with cirrhosis, hemochromatosis, and multiple small benign relatively hyperintense iron-poor foci consisting of piecemeal sideronecrosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/1415. New sonographic appearance of hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma in childhood.

    We present clinical, radiographic, and sonographic findings in 3 children with hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma, a rare benign tumor of childhood. The presence of round hyperechoic parietal nodules within the cystic spaces of the hamartomas is a new sonographic finding.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/1415. "The silent killer": chronic acetaminophen toxicity in a toddler.

    We report a case fatality from chronic acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in an 18-month-old toddler, born 14 weeks premature, who had been receiving less than the standard toxic threshold of the pediatric suspension of APAP for 4 days prior to presentation. Furthermore, he had been on prolonged total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as an infant. We hypothesize that TPN-induced hepatic changes may have diminished the patient's hepatic reserve, making him more susceptible to APAP toxicity. We propose that different "therapeutic" APAP dosing may be needed for those with underlying risk factors for hepatotoxicity.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.33333333333333
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/1415. Striking cholestatic liver disease: a distinct manifestation of advanced primary amyloidosis.

    In patients with systemic amyloidosis, amyloid fibrils are typically deposited in numerous organs, including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Although amyloid deposition in the liver is common in patients with systemic amyloidosis, clinical liver disease is relatively rare. The patient described here had cholestatic liver disease as the primary manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis. review of the literature suggests that prominent liver disease with cholestasis is unusual but probably underreported in patients with amyloidosis and appears to be restricted to patients with the primary form of amyloidosis. Nonetheless, cholestatic hepatic amyloidosis is characterized by distinct clinical, laboratory, and pathologic features; recognition of this process is critical because it identifies patients with widespread organ involvement and portends a poor prognosis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/1415. prenatal diagnosis of hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma.

    A case of hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma diagnosed prenatally with ultrasound and confirmed histologically post-delivery is presented. Although histologically benign, this lesion resulted in fetal demise secondary to congestive cardiac failure in the third trimester. The development of non-immune hydrops in association with a fetal hepatic mesenchymal hamartoma is a poor prognostic sign for perinatal survival.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/1415. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the liver--evidence for malignant transformation.

    A case of inflammatory pseudotumour of the liver is reported, and evidence is presented for its subsequent evolution into malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Such postulated malignant transformation challenges the assumption that hepatic inflammatory tumours are entirely benign lesions.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/1415. Pseudolesion in segments II and III of the liver on CT during arterial portography caused by aberrant right gastric venous drainage.

    We report three cases of pseudolesions caused by aberrant right gastric venous drainage (AGVD) in segment II/III of the liver as demonstrated on CT during arterial portography (CTAP). On CTAP, the lesions were seen as wedge-shaped perfusion defects, and on hepatic arteriography, AGVD directed to the area with the perfusion defect was visible in all three cases. When a perfusion defect is detected at the edge of segments II/III at CTAP, a pseudolesion caused by AGVD should be suspected.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/1415. Fibropolycystic disease of the hepatobiliary system and kidneys.

    This complicated case of fibropolycystic disease of the hepatobiliary system and kidneys was ably and incisively analyzed by Professor Sheila Sherlock. Her clinical acumen was revealed by her ability to differentiate congenital hepatic fibrosis, Caroli's disease, and adult polycystic disease of the liver and kidney. Interesting histologic features of this case included hepatic fibrosis with intact limiting plates anc central veins and the presence of bile plugs in the ducts, but the absence of bile statsis in the parenchyma. A percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram demonstrated the dilated intrahepatic and extrahepatic ducts. Washing out the "gunk" from the biliary tract by T-tube drainage has great limitations in this type of case. Therefore, Dr. Adson suggested irrigation of the biliary ductal system using tubed placed transhepatically, plus a wide choledojejunostomy. Dr. Sherlock questioned this surgical approach. The use of chenodeoxycholic acid for this "gunk" was suggested. In spite of the dilated ducts and pathologic changes in the liver, the patient was not jandiced and did not have stones in her biliary tract. The genetics of this patient's problems was discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/1415. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver and antiphospholipid antibodies: report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) is a rare disorder characterized by diffuse micronodular transformation of the hepatic parenchyma without fibrous septa between the nodules. This condition appears to be associated in many occasions with systemic autoimmune diseases. We describe two new patients with NRHL in whom antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) were detected in their sera and review the few similar cases reported previously. We also discuss the possible relationship between aPL and NRHL and suggest that these antibodies may play a role in the pathogenesis of some cases of NRHL, specially those with an associated antiphospholipid syndrome.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.16666666666667
keywords = hepatic
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Liver Diseases'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.