Cases reported "Liver Failure"

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1/286. liver transplantation for endstage hepatitis c cirrhosis in a patient with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia.

    liver transplantation was performed in a patient with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia, chronic hepatitis c and hepatic failure. The immediate posttransplant period was uncomplicated. Owing to a stricture of the choledochojejunostomy the patient was reoperated with construction of a hepaticojejunostomy 11 months posttransplant. The patient remained hepatitis c virus (HCV) rna-positive, with high and increasing levels of HCV. Liver biopsies demonstrated the recurrence of HCV. 14 months after the transplantation the patient developed severe diarrhoea caused by cryptosporidium parvum. The infection did not respond to available therapeutic measures. He deteriorated with development of liver failure and died 18 months after the transplantation. The present case report illustrates the difficulties associated with organ transplantation in patients with primary hypogammaglobulinaemia.
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keywords = hepatic
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2/286. "The silent killer": chronic acetaminophen toxicity in a toddler.

    We report a case fatality from chronic acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in an 18-month-old toddler, born 14 weeks premature, who had been receiving less than the standard toxic threshold of the pediatric suspension of APAP for 4 days prior to presentation. Furthermore, he had been on prolonged total parenteral nutrition (TPN) as an infant. We hypothesize that TPN-induced hepatic changes may have diminished the patient's hepatic reserve, making him more susceptible to APAP toxicity. We propose that different "therapeutic" APAP dosing may be needed for those with underlying risk factors for hepatotoxicity.
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keywords = hepatic
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3/286. Severe hepatotoxicity associated with bromfenac sodium.

    Subacute hepatitis and liver failure occurred in a 40-yr-old woman following a 1-month course of treatment with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug bromfenac. Serologies for hepatitis a, B, and C were negative, as were antinuclear antibodies and ceruloplasmin. A transjugular liver biopsy demonstrated submassive hepatic necrosis. The clinical course was complicated by encephalopathy, fluid retention, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, prompting consideration for liver transplantation. With supportive measures, jaundice and fluid retention resolved over a 3-month period. We conclude that prolonged use of bromfenac was the etiological agent in this case, and that this drug can cause severe hepatotoxicity resulting in liver failure.
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keywords = hepatic
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4/286. Low-dose cytarabine-induced hepatic and renal dysfunction in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    We report a 49-year-old female patient with secondary myelodysplastic syndrome who developed liver dysfunction and acute renal failure caused by low-dose cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) therapy. Treatment of low-dose Ara-C has widely been used for acute myelogeous leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome, and it is thought to be a low toxicity except for myelosuppression. The patient complained of a transient adverse reaction in the second and third course of therapy. This rare case indicates that careful observation should be carried out during low-dose Ara-C therapy in view of allergic reactions.
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ranking = 2
keywords = hepatic
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5/286. Long-term extracorporeal bilirubin elimination: A case report on cascade resin plasmaperfusion.

    Acute hepatic failure develops as a disease entity of rather diverse origin. With disease progression, toxic bilirubin levels may cause severe complications which include AV-nodal blockage, cardiac arrhythmia, impaired consciousness, generalized seizures, and status epilepticus. Treatment choices to prevent clinical deterioration comprise of costly and limited available orthotopic liver transplantation, utilization of extracorporeal bioartificial liver support devices and haemoperfusion/plasmaperfusion treatment with activated charcoal/anion exchange filters. Here, we present a patient with acute drug-induced cholestatic hepatitis. Excessively elevated bilirubin levels were accompanied by cardiac and cerebral complications. Extracorporeal resin perfusion treatment (Plasorba, BR-350) was successfully performed over a 50-day period without activation of the coagulation system or side effects. bilirubin levels were lowered to a minimum of 225 micromol/l, with concurrent clinical improvement. In conclusion, extracorporeal anion exchange plasmaperfusion may be a viable long-term treatment for hyperbilirubinaemic side effects in overt cholestatic hepatitis.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hepatic
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6/286. amoxicillin/clavulanate-associated hepatic failure with progression to stevens-johnson syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe a patient who developed hepatic failure, stevens-johnson syndrome (SJS), and died after receiving amoxicillin/clavulanate therapy. CASE SUMMARY: A 37-year-old white man without significant past medical history received a 10-day course of amoxicillin/clavulanate for treatment of pneumonia. Thirty-two days after starting amoxicillin/clavulanate, he developed jaundice, rash, pruritus, and increasing fatigue. On further evaluation, with the exclusion of toxicity from other drugs or diseases, the time course to development of cholestatic jaundice correlated with the use of amoxicillin/clavulanate. The patient consequently died with progressive hepatic failure, renal failure, and SJS. DISCUSSION: Hepatic injury has been reported with amoxicillin/clavulanate. signs and symptoms of jaundice and pruritus may appear up to to six weeks after stopping therapy. Most cases of liver injury have been benign and reversible on discontinuation of the amoxicillin/clavulanate. Reported hepatic reactions have been mainly cholestatic, with some mixed cholestatic/hepatocellular liver function test abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians should be aware of amoxicillin/clavulanate as a drug capable of causing hepatitis with eventual systemic dysfunction. While recovery is usually complete following withdrawal of the drug, in patients with rash associated with hepatic dysfunction, renal insufficiency, or other unusual symptoms, earlier consideration of initiating systemic steroids or liver transplantation referral, in hopes of avoiding progressive systemic response, might be worthwhile.
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ranking = 4
keywords = hepatic
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7/286. Severe multisystemic hypersensitivity reaction to carbamazepine including dyserythropoietic anemia.

    OBJECTIVE: To report a case of multisystemic hypersensitivity reaction to carbamazepine. CASE SUMMARY: An 81-year-old white man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, morbilliform pruritic rash, and jaundice. Fifty days before admission he had taken carbamazepine 200 mg p.o. tid because of seizures. During the first few days following admission, a maculopapular rash progressed to generalized erythroderma with subsequent extensive skin exfoliation. After discontinuing carbamazepine the fever disappeared within 72 hours and hepatic function tests returned to normal within four days. Moreover, after admission the hemoglobin values gradually fell to 6.7 g/100 mL. A bone marrow aspirate showed hypercellularity with marked dyserythropoietic abnormalities, and the bone marrow biopsy showed large and diffused infiltration due to the presence of a low-grade small lymphocytic lymphoma. No specific therapy for the lymphoma was undertaken. The biochemical follow-up showed a total improvement of hemoglobin values. Eight months after drug discontinuation, the patient was asymptomatic; peripheral blood cell count and hemoglobin concentrations were persistently normal. DISCUSSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published case report implicating carbamazepine as the cause of anemia associated with bone marrow hypercellularity and dyserythropoietic changes, instead of hypocellularity and reduction of erythroid precursors. An interesting point raised by our observation is the possible relation between carbamazepine intake and actual lymphoproliferative disease. The development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following carbamazepine treatment has been reported, with regression after the drug was discontinued. However, in our case, a bone marrow biopsy repeated eight months after drug discontinuation confirmed the diagnosis of low-grade lymphoma. CONCLUSIONS: This case report describes a severe multisystemic reaction, characterized by generalized erythroderma; and renal, hepatic, and bone marrow failure in a patient who started carbamazepine therapy 50 days beforehand.
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keywords = hepatic
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8/286. hepatitis a-induced diabetes mellitus, acute renal failure, and liver failure.

    A 38-year-old otherwise healthy man presented with hepatic failure (aspartate aminotransferase of 7212 U/L, alanine aminotransferase of 6629 U/L, total and direct bilirubin of 10.7 mg/dL) and acute renal failure (creatinine of 11.6 mg/dL and blood urea nitrogen of 42 mg/dL), which required hemodialysis when the creatinine increased to 21 mg/dL, with a blood urea nitrogen of 115 mg/dL, and the patient became oliguric. On admission, this patient also had a lipase of 1833 U/L, amylase of 211 U/L, glucose of 210 mg/dL, and reactive IgM antibody for acute hepatitis a. The hepatitis and acute renal failure resolved in 3 months, but this patient continues to have type II diabetes mellitus 7 years after the hepatitis a infection. This case illustrates that hepatitis a infection may be severe with liver failure, acute renal failure, and permanent diabetes mellitus as sequale of this infection.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = hepatic
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9/286. peliosis hepatis with initial presentation as acute hepatic failure and intraperitoneal hemorrhage in children.

    peliosis hepatis, a condition characterized by the presence of blood-filled lacunar spaces in the liver, usually has a chronic presentation pattern and is mainly reported in adult patients in association with chronic wasting disorders and after administration of various drugs. The present report concerns two previously healthy young children in whom peliosis hepatis initially presented as acute hepatic failure and who had escherichia coli pyelonephritis. Both patients had active intraperitoneal hemorrhage from the peliotic liver lesions, and liver ultrasonography showed multiple hypoechoic areas of different sizes, which in this context should suggest the diagnosis. One child died from hypovolemic shock and the other recovered. This study indicates that acute peliosis hepatis can be a serious life-threatening disease in children.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = hepatic
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10/286. Bromfenac (Duract)-associated hepatic failure requiring liver transplantation.

    Bromfenac sodium (Duract) is a phenylacetic acid-derived nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent introduced in the united states in 1997 and withdrawn in 1998. We describe the first case of fulminant hepatic failure associated with this agent treated successfully with liver transplantation. Similarities to hepatotoxicity with related agents is discussed.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = hepatic
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