Cases reported "Liver Neoplasms"

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1/61. Congenital bilateral cystic neuroblastoma with liver metastases and massive intracystic haemorrhage.

    A case of bilateral cystic neuroblastoma with liver metastases in a newborn is reported. CT showed a 10 cm right suprarenal multicystic mass and numerous hepatic cystic masses with intracystic fluid-fluid levels. Multiple smaller cystic lesions were also present in the left adrenal gland. To our knowledge, the CT findings of neonatal bilateral cystic neuroblastoma with liver metastasis and massive acute intracystic haemorrhage has not been previously documented.
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keywords = haemorrhage
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2/61. Long-term outcome of liver transplantation in patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    liver transplantation may be indicated in patients with GSD type Ia when dietary treatment fails or when hepatic adenomas develop, because they carry a risk of liver cancer or severe intratumoral haemorrhage. Published reports on the results of liver transplantation in patients with GSD Ia include 10 patients and provide little information on long-term outcome. In particular, it is not known whether liver transplantation prevents renal failure due to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We report here on 3 patients with GSD Ia in whom liver transplantation was performed at 15, 17 and 23 years of age because of multiple hepatic adenomas in all 3 patients with a fear of malignant transformation, and of poor metabolic balance and severe growth retardation in the youngest one. Renal function was normal in all patients. During the 6-8 years following transplantation, the quality of life has initially greatly improved, with none of the previous dietary restraints and a spectacular increase in height. However, long-term complications included chronic hepatitis c in one patient, gouty attacks in another and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis with progressive renal insufficiency in the third. These results: (1) confirm that liver transplantation restores a normal metabolic balance in patients with GSD Ia, allows catch-up growth and improves the quality of life; (2) suggest that liver transplantation may be considered in teenagers with unresectable multiple adenomas because of a lack of clear-cut criteria to detect malignant transformation early; and (3) suggest that liver transplantation does not prevent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis associated with GSD Ia.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = haemorrhage
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3/61. Extracorporeal bypass using a centrifugal pump during resection of malignant liver tumors.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Total hepatic vascular exclusion (THVE) during extracorporeal bypass is used for hepatic resection in patients with malignant liver tumors. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of hepatectomy during total hepatic vascular exclusion using a centrifugal pump (Bio-pump). METHODOLOGY: Fourteen patients with malignant liver tumors who underwent hepatectomy during total hepatic vascular exclusion using the Bio-pump were studied retrospectively. RESULTS: In 3 of 14 patients, insufficient hepatic vascular exclusion was achieved. Six patients underwent tumor resection during total hepatic vascular exclusion, without extracorporeal bypass. In the remaining 5 patients, flow exclusion averaging 1500 ml was achieved with the Bio-pump, and hepatectomy was performed during the procedure. In these 5 patients, the mean operative time and blood loss were 11 hours 38 minutes and 6850 /- 2451 ml. The Bio-pump bypass time, the excluded blood flow and the mean blood pressure were 82 minutes, 1650 ml and 108/53 mmHg, respectively. The arterial ketone body ratio (AKBR) decreased from a pre-operative value of 1.85-0.32 during total hepatic vascular exclusion. CONCLUSIONS: Total hepatic vascular exclusion was useful for hepatectomy in patients with tumor invasion into the hepatic vein and inferior vena cava, or tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava and right atrium. However, this technique did not decrease blood loss or improve outcome in patients undergoing hepatectomy.
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ranking = 8.3464511630578
keywords = blood loss
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4/61. laparoscopy extends the indications for liver resection in patients with cirrhosis.

    BACKGROUND: Clinical or biological evidence of liver failure is usually considered a contraindication to open liver surgery as it is associated with a prohibitive risk of postoperative death. methods: This report describes three patients who had resection of a superficial hepatocellular carcinoma suspected either to be ruptured, or at high risk of rupture, using the laparoscopic approach. All three patients had intractable ascites, in two superimposed on active hepatitis. Surgery was per- formed under continuous carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum with intermittent clamping of the hepatic pedicle. RESULTS: Intraoperative blood loss was between 100 and 400 ml; no blood transfusion was required. The postoperative course was uneventful except for a transient leak of ascites through the trocar wounds. Duration of in-hospital stay was 6-10 days. liver function tests had returned to preoperative values within 1 month of surgery in all patients. CONCLUSION: The laparoscopic approach may enable liver resection in patients with cirrhosis and evidence of liver failure that would contraindicate open surgery.
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ranking = 4.1732255815289
keywords = blood loss
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5/61. Rare presentation of small bowel leiomyosarcoma with liver metastases.

    Intraabdominal sarcomas are rare tumours usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. These lesions at presentation are bulky and symptoms are often related to pressure effects on adjacent organs. This case report describes a rare presentation of a small bowel leiomyosarcoma whose initial presentation was free haemorrhage into the abdominal cavity and concomitant liver metastases. This case report also demonstrates that, even with such a rare presentation, an aggressive surgical approach is indicated in this type of tumour and helps a patient with advanced disease to live a few disease-free months with a good quality of life.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = haemorrhage
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6/61. postoperative complications of repeat hepatectomy for liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma.

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: When a repeat hepatectomy is possible, it is the most effective treatment modality for recurrent colorectal liver metastasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surgical risks of repeat hepatectomy for liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma. METHODOLOGY: Between 1986 and 1996, 60 patients with hepatic metastasis from colorectal carcinoma underwent surgery in the Department of Surgery I, Oita Medical University. Ten of them underwent a repeat hepatectomy. The cases of these 10 patients were studied retrospectively; in particular, postoperative complications and intraoperative blood loss were compared between the initial and second operation. RESULTS: During the second surgery, recurrence was detected adjacent to the hepatic stump in 9 of the 10 patients. During the initial surgery, 6 underwent non-anatomic resections, and 4 had anatomic resection, including 1 extended lobectomy, 1 lobectomy, and 2 segmentectomies. For the second surgery, 3 had anatomic resections, including 2 lobectomies, and 1 segmentectomy, and 7 underwent non-anatomic resections. There were no mortalities during the initial or second operation. There was no morbidity following the initial surgeries and 7 postoperative complications (intraabdominal abscess, 4 cases; biloma, 3 cases) following the second surgeries. Mean blood loss during the second operation (1044 mL) was significantly greater than during the initial operation (561 mL). CONCLUSIONS: The present results show that repeat hepatectomy for recurrent liver metastasis from colorectal carcinoma resulted in significantly greater intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications than those of the initial surgeries. The blood loss and complications in the second operation, the one for the recurrence, were directly associated with the fact that the recurrence was so close to the hepatic stump. Since the resection line in the second surgery was adjacent to the hepatic hilus, resection of the lesion caused much more injury to the main bile duct and main portal vein than that caused by the.
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ranking = 12.519676744587
keywords = blood loss
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7/61. Active contrast extravasation in spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: a rare CT finding.

    Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinomas are uncommon but constitute a critical and life threatening condition. diagnosis is important so that either surgery or emergency arterial embolisation can be considered for hepatic haemostasis. We describe active extravasation of intravenous contrast medium on CT in a patient who presented with intraperitoneal haemorrhage secondary to spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = haemorrhage
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8/61. Life-threatening haemorrhage from a sternal metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.

    rupture of the tumour is a catastrophic complication of hepatocellular carcinoma. The prognosis in patients with a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma is usually unfavourable. We describe a 46-year-old man who suffered from visible massive tumour haemorrhage due to a hepatitis b-related hepatocellular carcinoma that metastasized to the sternal bone. The prominent tumour mass was bulging over the anterior chest wall on the sternum of the patient, and bled spontaneously. This episode of life-threatening haemorrhage was stopped by surgical ligation of the bleeding site. Palliative radiotherapy shrank the tumour mass size and prevented further possible bleeding. This is likely to be the first reported case with a visible spontaneous tumour bleeding from a sternal metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = haemorrhage
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9/61. Hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the right atrium: report of a successful liver resection by hepatic vascular exclusion using cardiopulmonary bypass.

    We report a successful liver resection using cardiopulmonary bypass with, total hepatic vascular exclusion (THVE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), with extension into the right atrium. A 61-year-old man with a cirrhotic liver was referred to our department with HCC in the medial segment of the left lobe of the liver, and tumor thrombus extending into the right atrium. During surgery, a left lobe and caudate lobe of the liver were transected leaving the left lobe of the liver connected to the inferior vena cava (IVC) by only the left and middle hepatic trunks, and then the intracaval tumor thrombus and the left lobe of the liver were removed en bloc using cardiopulmonary bypass with total hepatic vascular exclusion (THVE). Cardiac arrest was not performed during THVE, and the patient had an uneventful postoperative course and was discharged from the hospital 2 months following surgery. He died of multiple pulmonary metastases 4 years and 8 months after surgery; however, imaging showed no evidence of recurrence in the remnant liver during that period. In conclusion, by performing dissection of the hepatic parenchyma to the hepatic vein prior to removal of the tumor thrombus, the period of extracorporeal circulation, duration of warm ischemic time to the liver, and intraoperative blood loss were all reduced and a radical operation could be performed safely without scattering tumor cells during extirpation of the tumor.
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ranking = 4.1732255815289
keywords = blood loss
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10/61. liver transplantation for massive hepatic haemangiomatosis causing restrictive lung disease.

    A 34-yr-old man with hepatic haemangiomatosis presented for orthotopic liver transplantation. His massively distended abdomen caused thoracic compression and severe restrictive lung disease. Respiratory failure was the principal indication for transplantation. Increased airway pressures, pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension caused by aorto-caval compression, and blood loss, complicated the intra-operative anaesthetic management. weaning from mechanical ventilation was impaired by acute and chronic metabolic alkalosis, and diaphragmatic laxity.
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ranking = 4.1732255815289
keywords = blood loss
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