Cases reported "Liver Neoplasms"

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11/61. Twenty-two years' survival of metastatic gastrinoma evidenced recently by somatostatin-receptor-specific scintigraphy.

    An 18-year-old male presented in 1979 with a gastrinoma of unknown primary origin. Massive upper-digestive haemorrhage led to total gastrectomy, at which histology evidenced liver metastases, confirmed 9 months later at reoperation for an intestinal occlusion. Postoperative morphological evidence of liver metastases was repeatedly negative using abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but a recent somatostatin-receptor-specific scintigraphy (Octreoscan) was positive only in the liver area. Twenty-two years after diagnosis, the primary tumour has not been identified, the patient leads a normal life, and his circulating gastrin levels, although still elevated at 317-550 pg/ml (normal < 127 pg/ml), have fallen over recent years from > 1000 pg/ml. We discuss the relevance of the described prognostic factors.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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12/61. Preparatory hepatic resection with right hepatic vein reconstruction for paracaval liver tumor.

    A liver tumor in the paracaval portion was very difficult to resect because of its anatomical situation. We therefore employed a technique using right hepatic vein (RHV) resection and reconstruction following the resection of segments VII/VIII with the paracaval portion. The patient was a 70-year-old man who had a hepatocellular carcinoma in the paracaval portion, and the root of the RHV was compressed by the tumor. Computed tomography (CT) during arterioportography under temporary balloon occlusion of the RHV demonstrated hypoattenuation of the entire posterior segment, meaning that RHV reconstruction following the resection of segments VII/VIII with RHV resection would be necessary. We performed the above-mentioned operation without any trouble. On mobilizing segments VI/V to the caudal direction after dissecting the distal RHV, the paracaval Glissons were easily exposed and dissected anteriorly from the first order of the right Glissonean sheath. Our preliminary surgical technique, based on IVR-CT, could provide a better surgical field and result in decreased operating time and decreased blood loss in paracaval liver malignancy.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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13/61. Bleeding portal-hypertensive gastropathy managed successfully by partial splenic embolization.

    The use of partial splenic embolization to decrease portal pressure and reduce gastric bleeding from portal-hypertensive gastropathy, a complication of liver cirrhosis, is described. A 62-year-old man with hepatic cirrhosis secondary to hepatitis c and documented portal hypertension was admitted with hypersplenism and bleeding esophageal varices. Endoscopic ligation successfully controlled acute bleeding, but blood loss continued over the next 45 days. Bleeding secondary to portal-hypertensive gastropathy was diagnosed endoscopically. The patient's poor surgical status precluded a portosystemic shunt procedure, so partial splenic embolization was performed radiologically by the injection of Gelfoam squares. Splenic volume decreased 50% following partial embolization. Over 3 weeks, the hemoglobin concentration increased from 8.5 g/dL to 9.8 g/dL, and the platelet count increased from 41,000 to 90,000/microL. Repeat endoscopy found no gastric bleeding 18 days post-procedure. Partial splenic embolization is a radiologic procedure which can be performed safely in patients too ill to undergo portosystemic shunt. This report documents its successful use to manage hypersplenism and reduce portal pressure in a cirrhotic patient with portal-hypertensive gastropathy and hypersplenism.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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14/61. A novel approach to gallbladder cancer in a Jehovah's Witness.

    Transfusion of blood or blood products peri- or postoperatively is often necessary in patients undergoing liver resections for hepatic or biliary tract neoplasms. In jehovah's witnesses this inevitably poses a difficult dilemma for clinicians. A 66-year-old female Jehovah's Witness with a T1b gallbladder cancer was referred to our specialist unit for further treatment after having had a routine laparoscopic cholecystectomy in another hospital. Although an abdominal computed tomography scan preoperatively showed a normal liver with no evidence of regional lymph node involvement, histologically the tumor was found in the posterior wall of the gallbladder adherent to the liver bed and had a full thickness involvement of the muscular layer, raising suspicion of a local invasion into the liver bed. The patient, having refused liver resection, was treated with a laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation under intraoperative ultrasound guidance using a newly developed "cooled-tip" needle and a 500-kHz radiofrequency generator. A "zone of necrosis" measuring 3.5 cm in diameter was created in the liver bed and adjacent tissues. The procedure lasted 90 min with no blood loss. Postoperatively, the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day and remained disease free at the 9-month follow-up. Although the follow-up in this case was too short to determine the long-term result of this approach, we believe that this is a single unique case posing a challenging problem to clinicians for which radiofrequency ablation may have a role in offering an alternative to major resections.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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15/61. hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection.

    Thanks to recent advances, performance of liver resection is now possible using laparoscopic procedures. However, still there are some difficulties to overcome. The hand-assisted method lends safety and reliability to the laparoscopic procedure. A 54-year-old man diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred for hepatectomy. angiography with computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 2-cm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at segment V, close to the gallbladder. A hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection was performed. Four 10-mm trocars, one for wall lifting and three for working, were placed in the upper abdomen. A small incision was added at the right side of umbilicus, and the operator's left hand was inserted through it. A microwave tissue coagulator and laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector were used for liver resection. Total operation time was 162 min; blood loss was 20 g. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. We thus demonstrated that laparoscopic liver resection is safer and easier when the hand of the operator can be inserted into the abdomen. The small incision does not greatly diminish the benefits that accrue from minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. The hand-assisted procedure allows better access to the tumor. In addition, hand assistance restores the sense of touch to the operator and is an effective means of controlling sudden and unexpected bleeding.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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16/61. Early experience employing a linear hepatic parenchyma coagulation device.

    BACKGROUND: In recent years, hepatic resection for primary and metastatic disease has been facilitated by improved anesthetic and surgical techniques, as well as by the application of new technologies. Historically, the major complications associated with hepatic resection have been postoperative bleeding, bile leak, and liver failure. Resection techniques and devices that minimize hemorrhage and bile leak, and enable the preservation of functional hepatic parenchyma, have been useful in the surgical management of liver tumors. methods: Herein, the use of a radiofrequency powered device for the pretransection coagulation of hepatic tissue that simultaneously seals blood vessels and bile ducts 3 mm in diameter or smaller is described. RESULTS: Early results from our single-center experience with the use of this linear radiofrequency device are reported. Seven patients underwent liver resection for either hepatocellular carcinoma or colorectal cancer metastases. There were no postoperative bile leaks, hemorrhage, or hepatic insufficiency. No transfusions were required, and the mean estimated blood loss for the parenchymal transection phase was less than 165 cc. CONCLUSIONS: The linear radiofrequency device is expedient for the pretransection coagulation of hepatic tissue and, thus, facilitates liver resection.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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17/61. Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: an approach with delayed hepatectomy.

    Two cirrhotic patients with ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), presenting with hemoperitoneum, were successfully treated by elective hepatectomy. Both of these patients, a 67-year-old female and a 76-year-old male, had first been taken to other primary hospitals by ambulance due to hypovolemic shock. They were then found to have a mass of approximately 5 cm in the cirrhotic liver. In the initial management, however, neither any direct hemostasis by surgery nor indirect measures such as transcatheter hepatic arterial embolization were performed in either case. Instead, conservative treatment consisting mainly of fresh blood and plasma transfusions were continued for more than a month until the liver function stabilized. In both hepatectomies, the use of a microwave tissue coagulator resulted in minimal intra-operative blood loss and an appreciably excellent post-operative course. These cases point to the effectiveness of a "wait and see" policy for selected patients with ruptured HCC.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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18/61. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with precocious puberty and oral contraceptives. A case report.

    A 36-year-old woman presented with sudden abdominal pain and vomiting. Computed tomography showed a tumour of the right hepatic lobe with possible signs of acute haemorrhage. Her medical history revealed precocious puberty when she was a 5-year-old and the use of oral contraceptives for 18 years. Bisegmentectomy was performed and histological examination revealed hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of male and female sex hormones in the development of hepatic tumours has been well documented but, to our knowledge, association with precocious puberty has not yet been described.
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ranking = 1
keywords = haemorrhage
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19/61. hepatectomy with transcatheter arterial embolization for large hepatoma in the caudate lobe.

    The prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma originating from the caudate lobe (caudate HCC) is generally poor, and surgical treatment for caudate HCC is difficult to perform due to the location. We postulate that a combination of surgical resection and transcatheter arterial embolization improves the prognosis, and that operative procedure is straightforward. We examined three cases of large solitary caudate HCC. Three patients (a 68-year-old woman, 65-year-old man, and 71-year-old man) with caudate HCC and viral chronic hepatitis were treated with preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization and partial resection of the caudate lobe. After transcatheter arterial embolization, the solitary hepatocellular carcinomas decreased in size (9 to 6, 10 to 8, and 7 to 5 cm in diameter, respectively) which simplified surgical resection (1120, 3010, and 2110 cc blood loss; 4.5, 7, and 7 hours of operative time, respectively). All the hepatocellular carcinomas were poorly differentiated, and had infiltrated microscopically into the portal vein. The outcome was satisfactory (18, 16, and 10 months after the operation, two cases were alive, and one dead, respectively). The combination of preoperative transcatheter arterial embolization and partial resection for caudate HCC, especially large solitary caudate HCC, works well as a multimodal therapy.
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ranking = 20.866127907645
keywords = blood loss
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20/61. Spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report and review of literature.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a tendency for fatal spontaneous rupture leading to massive haemorrhage. A 64-year-old man presented with sudden, severe epigastric pain for 6 h. Systolic blood pressure was 80/50 mmHg, and pulse rate was 100/min. The patient's history did not reveal any operation or disease up to date. Contrast enhancement-axial computed tomography (CT) scan showed a tumoral lesion with a necrotic centre measuring 6 x 5 cm within 6th segment of the liver and a fluid collection (haemoperitoneum) at the periphery of the liver. At exploratory laparotomy, the liver was found to be cirrhotic, and an actively bleeding tumour confirmed in 6th segment of the liver. The tumour was resected. Post-operative recovery was unremarkable, and the patient was discharged on the 14th post-operative day. Ruptured HCC should be included in the differential diagnosis of non-traumatic intra-abdominal haemorrhage.
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ranking = 2
keywords = haemorrhage
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