Cases reported "Lordosis"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/4. Isolated thoracolumbar and lumbar hyperlordosis in a patient with cerebral palsy.

    A severe isolated thoracolumbar and lumbar hyperlordosis spinal deformity occurring in a patient with cerebral palsy is rare and has not been reported before. The authors describe the presentation, operative considerations, and treatment of patients with this unusual hyperlordotic spinal deformity, particularly those with cerebral palsy. A multiple-stage surgical reconstruction was required to correct this complex spinal deformity. The patient underwent bilateral femoral extension osteotomies along with spinal extensor myotomies to ensure proper prone positioning for his anticipated spinal surgery. Then he had staged anterior releases and spinal fusion from T8 to the sacrum followed by 2 weeks of "90-90" femoral skeletal traction. Finally, a posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation from T2 to the pelvis definitively corrected his deformity. The patient responded well to surgical intervention without complications and continues to have stable correction of his hyperlordosis deformity 2 years after surgery. Severe lordotic sagittal plane spinal deformities can be treated with anterior and posterior spinal fusion and instrumentation with intervening traction in the properly selected and prepared patient who has cerebral palsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/4. Spinal lordosis with marked opisthotonus secondary to dystonia musculorum deformans: case report with surgical management.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of severe spinal lordosis with marked opisthotonus and retrocollis secondary to dystonia musculorum deformans is presented. OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of dystonia musculorum deformans with progressive spinal lordosis and its surgical treatment. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Four patients with correction of coronal spinal deformity associated with dystonia musculorum deformans have been reported in the literature. No reports of sagittal spinal deformity treated with surgical instrumentation and fusion were found. methods: A retrospective chart and radiographic review of a single case was conducted. RESULTS: Orthotic management and pharmacologic therapy with botulinum toxin injections were unsuccessful in controlling the deformity. Severe spinal lordosis (170 degrees ) from occiput to sacrum was corrected surgically, allowing an upright posture. CONCLUSION: dystonia musculorum deformans is a rare condition resulting in coronal or sagittal plane deformities. When other treatment methods are unsuccessful, surgical instrumentation and arthrodesis may correct the deformity and improve function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/4. Burst fracture of the fifth lumbar vertebra.

    Burst fracture of the fifth lumbar vertebra is a rare injury. We report the cases of seven patients who were treated conservatively by immobilization for six to eight weeks in a body-jacket cast that included one lower extremity to the knee. The patients were allowed to walk ten to fourteen days after the injury. A thoracolumbosacral orthosis was worn for an additional three months. No patient had an injury to the sacral root. Two patients had mild lower lumbar motor-root deficits that resolved within one year. All patients had an occasional backache, and two had intermittent radicular-type pain in the distribution of the fifth lumbar or first sacral-nerve root. The degree of compromise of the spinal canal could not be directly related to the degree of neurological deficit; that is, a large compromise of the spinal canal did not necessarily result in a major loss of neurological function. There was no early or late loss of lordosis between the cephalad end-plate of the fourth lumbar vertebra and the cephalad aspect of the sacrum, and there were no signs of progressive collapse of the vertebral body in any patient. In our series, the burst fractures of the fifth lumbar vertebra were stable injuries that caused minimum neurological deficits, and treatment by immobilization in a body-jacket cast was effective.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/4. Complete bilateral agenesis of the ilium in a 7-year-old ambulatory girl: case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A 7-year-old ambulatory girl with complete bilateral agenesis of the ilium is reported. OBJECTIVE: To document the clinical evolution and the spino-pelvic balance of a girl with bilateral agenesis of the ilium. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Scapuloiliac dysostosis is a rare focal skeletal dysplasia consisting in hypoplasia of ilium and scapula. methods: A 7-year-old girl with a short stature was referred to our clinic at 35 months of age for an asymptomatic lumbar hyperlordosis. She presented a waddling gait, and normal range of motion of her upper and lower limbs. The neurologic examination was within normal limits. RESULTS: Initial radiographs at 35 months of age showed complete bilateral agenesis of the ilium with preservation of the pubis, ischium, and sacrum, associated with a bilateral high hip dislocation. The lumbar lordosis and sacral slope were 89 degrees and 84 degrees, respectively. A radiographic skeletal survey also showed hypoplasia of both scapulae. At 7 years old, the girl was fully ambulatory, with a waddling gait and had no pain. The sacral slope and lumbar lordosis have increased to 97 degrees and 97 degrees, respectively. There was no evidence of spondylolisthesis. So far, the patient has required no treatment for her condition. CONCLUSION: This article reports a unique case of scapuloiliac dysostosis with complete bilateral agenesis of the ilium in an ambulatory girl. This case indicates that a functional gait is possible with bilateral congenital absence of the ilium, provided that there is adequate muscular support and normal neurologic function.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Lordosis'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.