Cases reported "Low Back Pain"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/38. Thoracic disc herniation mimicking acute lumbar disc disease.

    STUDY DESIGN: Case report of a 49-year-old woman with a lower thoracic disc herniation mimicking acute lumbosacral radiculopathy. OBJECTIVE: To describe an unusual case of thoracic disc herniation mimicking acute lumbar disc disease. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is rare and its clinical manifestations differ widely from those of cervical and lumbar disc herniations. Midline back pain and signs of spinal cord compression progressing over months or years are the predominant clinical features. Acute and subacute thoracic disc herniation occurs in less than 10% of patients, and isolated root pain is unusual. methods: A 49-year-old woman had acute low back pain radiation into the left buttock and the lateral aspect of the left leg and left foot. magnetic resonance imaging study showed a bulging disc and posterior osteophytes at T11-T12. RESULTS: Surgical removal of the herniated disc and osteophytes rapidly relieved her symptoms and neurologic deficits. A follow-up neurologic examination 3 years later showed normal motor and sensory functions, although low back soreness was noted occasionally. CONCLUSION: A case of thoracic disc herniation mimicking an acute lumbosacral radiculopathy is presented. Compression of the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots at the lower thoracic level after exit from the lumbar enlargement may be the mechanism for this unusual presentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/38. L4-5 disk lesion resulting in back pain with bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction without paraparesis.

    This is a case report of a patient with bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction associated with low back pain. This patient had an essentially normal neurological examination. There was radiological evidence of a disk lesion, and urodynamic findings consistent with lower motor neuron bladder dysfunction. His symptoms are attributed to a L4-5 disk herniation resulting in a partial cauda equina syndrome. The relevant anatomy is reviewed, and the differential diagnosis is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.1
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/38. Management of acute lumbar disk herniation initially presenting as mechanical low back pain.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical management with spinal manipulation of a male patient with risk factors for lumbar disk herniation initially suffering from what appeared to be mechanical low back pain that evolved into radiculopathy; also to review issues pertinent to chiropractic/manipulative management of disk herniation. CLINICAL FEATURES: The patient initially suffered from unilateral low back pain and nonradicular/nonlancinating referral to the ipsilateral lower extremity. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: Disk herniation-in-evolution was included in the differential diagnosis, which was discussed with the patient, who then gave verbal informed consent for manipulative management. A day or so after the initial manipulation the presentation evolved to include S1 radiculopathy. Computed tomography, just after onset of radiculopathy, confirmed the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral disk herniation. The patient continued with manipulative management and repeat computed tomography examination after clinical resolution about 2 months later revealed reduction in size of the apparently clinically significant herniation. CONCLUSION: risk factors for the development of disk herniation should be considered when assessing patients suffering from what appears to be mechanical low back pain. The role played by manipulation in the development of disk herniation in this case was believed to be circumstantial rather than causal. Manipulation was used in the treatment of this patient over a period of approximately 2 months; after this time, clinical and partial computed tomography imaging resolution was evident. Ongoing clinical (neurologic) evaluation of patients with manifest or suspected disk herniation is an important aspect of management. Good-quality trials of manipulation for patients with disk herniation are imperative for the chiropractic profession.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/38. A migrated lumbar disc herniation simulating a dumbbell tumor.

    We report a case of a migrated lumbar disc hemiation, which on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) simulated a dumbbell tumor in a 44-year-old woman who had severe pain in her right buttock and leg. A large epidural mass mimicking a dumbbell tumor was detected at the L5 vertebral level by MRI and computed tomography over myelography. Surgical fenestration of the L4/L5 interlaminar space revealed a dorsolateral epidural mass connected to the L5/S1 intervertebral disc extending laterally through the right L5/S1 intervertebral foramen. Histologically, it was degenerative disc material without active inflammation. Reevaluation of the MRI suggested some clues that might be useful in differentiating such a herniated disc from an epidural tumor.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.4
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/38. Dorsally sequestrated thoracic disc herniation--case report.

    A 53-year-old male presented with a rare dorsally sequestrated thoracic disc herniation manifesting as acute low back pain and weakness. He had no history of trauma. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a mass at T10-11 intervertebral level connected with the T-10 disc. Axial MR imaging showed the mass had surrounded and compressed the dural sac from the lateral and dorsal sites. MR imaging with gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid showed slight rim enhancement of the lesion. Computed tomography detected no abnormal calcification. The diagnosis was thoracic disc herniation. laminectomy resulted in rapid and satisfactory recovery. The histological diagnosis was thoracic disc herniation. MR imaging was very effective for the diagnosis based on the connection between the mass and the disc space. The differential diagnosis includes metastatic epidural tumor, epidural hematoma, and epidural abscess.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.7
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/38. Two cases of reiterated Horner's syndrome after lumbar epidural block.

    We describe two young men with low back pain, who were given repeat lumbar epidural blocks for treatment of pain. They both developed reiterated unilateral Homer's syndrome. Computer tomography and myelography of the lumbar spine prior to the intervention showed signs of suspect disc herniation and sequelae after previous surgery.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.1
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/38. Fibrous adhesive entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots as a cause of sciatica.

    STUDY DESIGN: Report of seven patients with fibrous adhesive entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots as a cause of sciatica, whose radiographic findings were negative and who experienced relief from sciatica immediately after the entrapment was released. OBJECTIVES: To describe a new clinical entity of fibrous adhesive entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots with negative radiographic findings. SETTING: Orthopaedic department, japan. methods: Clinical evaluation and post-operative outcome in seven patients with entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots because of fibrous adhesion confirmed intraoperatively. RESULTS: Radiographic examinations by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), myelography, and computed tomographic (CT) myelography demonstrated neither disc herniations nor spinal stenosis in all seven patients, and differential nerve root block was effective for relieving sciatica and low back pain. We confirmed, intraoperatively, entrapment of the nerve root by fibrous adhesion, and all seven patients were relieved from sciatica and low back pain postoperatively. CONCLUSION: This study presented seven patients with sciatica caused by fibrous adhesive entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots who underwent decompression and release of fibrous adhesion. Radiographic examinations, such as MRI, myelography and CT myelography, showed no compressive shadows and also differential nerve root block was effective for its diagnosis. This study seems to be the first report of patients with entrapment of lumbosacral nerve roots caused by fibrous adhesion, whose radiographic findings were negative.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.1
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/38. Dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential demonstration of nerve root decompression after VAX-D therapy.

    Reductions in low back pain and referred leg pain associated with a diagnosis of herniated disc, degenerative disc disease or facet syndrome have previously been reported after treatment with a VAX-D table, which intermittently distracts the spine. The object of this study was to use dermatomal somatosensory evoked potentials (DSSEPs) to demonstrate lumbar root decompression following VAX-D therapy. Seven consecutive patients with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral or bilateral L5 or S1 radiculopathy were studied at our center. Disc herniation at the L5-S1 level was documented by MRI or CT in all patients. All patients were studied bilaterally by DSSEPs at L5 and S1 before and after VAX-D therapy. All patients had at least 50% improvement in radicular symptoms and low back pain and three of them experienced complete resolution of all symptoms. The average pain reduction was 77%. The number of treatment sessions varied from 12 to 35. DSSEPs were considered to show improvement if triphasic characteristics returned or a 50% or greater increase in the P1-P2 amplitude was seen. All patients showed improvement in DSSEPs after VAX-D therapy either ipsilateral or contralateral to the symptomatic leg. Two patients showed deterioration in DSSEPs in the symptomatic leg despite clinically significant improvement in pain and radicular symptoms. overall, 28 nerve roots were studied before and after VAX-D therapy. Seventeen nerve root responses were improved, eight remained unchanged and three deteriorated. The significance of DSSEP improvement contralateral to the symptomatic leg is emphasized. Direct compression of a nerve root by a disc herniation is probably not the sole explanation for referred leg pain.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/38. Disc herniation after lumbar fusion.

    STUDY DESIGN: Eight patients with a herniated disc after lumbar spinal fusion are reported. Their clinical features, imaging studies, and management are reported. OBJECTIVES: To identify the incidence and features of disc herniation above a spinal fusion, and to describe their management. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Late complications of lumbar spinal fusions have been reported in the literature, but disc herniation has not been specifically addressed in detail. The motion segment above a spinal fusion undergoes additional stresses, as documented by increased pressure and excessive motion, resulting in degenerative changes. These factors likely predispose to disc herniation. methods: Of 601 consecutive lumbar fusion cases over an 8-year period, herniated nucleus pulposus above the fusion was diagnosed in 8 patients. The clinical findings and imaging studies were reviewed, including a myelogram computed tomography scan, a magnetic resonance image with positive documentation of the herniation, or both. The management of these cases was reviewed. RESULTS: Eight patients (1.3%) (4 men and 4 women) were identified, whose average age was 56.4 years. Nonoperative treatment failed in six patients. Two of these patients underwent simple discectomy, and the remaining four underwent discectomy and fusion. All four patients went on to fusion. The average time from disc herniation onset to fusion was 28.4 months. CONCLUSIONS: Herniated disc after lumbar spinal fusion was found in approximately 1.3% of patients. Although rare, this entity that should be considered when patients complain of recurring back pain after a lumbar spinal fusion.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.9
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/38. Lumbar disc herniation and tight hamstrings syndrome in adolescence.

    BACKGROUND: Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation is infrequently encountered in children and adolescents. Additional signs and symptoms such as postural deformities and abnormal gait accompany the classical findings of lumbar root irritation. These unusual signs have been described in the literature as "tight hamstrings syndrome". Waddling gait with flexed knees is considered as pathognomonic for this condition and may be masked by the signs of root irritation due to prolapsed intervertebral disc material. CASE REPORT AND DISCUSSION: We report an adolescent patient with lumbar disc herniation in whom gait abnormality and limitation of lumbar movements persisted after surgical intervention. A review of the literature on tight hamstrings is presented.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.6
keywords = herniation
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Low Back Pain'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.