Cases reported "Low Back Pain"

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11/25. chiropractic management of ehlers-danlos syndrome: a report of two cases.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss 2 patients with ehlers-danlos syndrome seeking chiropractic evaluation and management of their disabling musculoskeletal pain and associated disorders. CLINICAL FEATURES: Two disabled patients diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome had spinal pain, including neck and back pain, headache, and extremity pain. Commonalities among these 2 cases included abnormal spinal curvatures (kyphosis and scoliosis), joint hypermobility, and tissue fragility. One patient had postsurgical thoracolumbar spinal fusion (T11-sacrum) for scoliosis and osteoporosis. The other patient had moderate anterior head translation. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: Both patients were treated with mechanical force and manually assisted spinal adjustments delivered to various spinal segments and extremities utilizing an Activator II Adjusting Instrument and Activator methods chiropractic Technique. patients were also given postural advice, stabilization exercises, and postural corrective exercises, as indicated in chiropractic biophysics Technique protocols. Both patients were able to reduce pain and anti-inflammatory medication usage in association with chiropractic care. Significant improvement in self-reported pain and disability as measured by visual analog score, Oswestry Low-Back Disability Index, and neck pain Disability Index were reported, and objective improvements in physical examination and spinal alignment were also observed following chiropractic care. Despite these improvements, work disability status remained unchanged in both patients. CONCLUSION: chiropractic care may be of benefit to some patients with connective tissue disorders, including ehlers-danlos syndrome. Low-force chiropractic adjusting techniques may be a preferred technique of choice in patients with tissue fragility, offering clinicians a viable alternative to traditional chiropractic care in attempting to minimize risks and/or side effects associated with spinal manipulation. Psychosocial issues, including patient desire to return to work, were important factors in work disability status and perceived outcome.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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12/25. Primary hydatid disease of sacrum affecting the sacroiliac joint: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of hydatid disease of the spine. OBJECTIVE: To describe an unusual case of hydatid disease of the sacrum affecting the sacroiliac joint and to discuss imaging, differential diagnosis, and treatment. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Hydatidosis or echinococcosis affecting the spine is rare and has a characteristic geographic distribution. Signs of sacroiliac joint involvement and accompanying neurologic deficits cause difficulties in differential diagnosis of this rare condition. methods: A case of 38-year-old female patient with low back pain and sciatica was presented. RESULTS: Plain radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed destructive expansive lesion located on the right sacrum and extended through the right sacroiliac joint. Surgical enucleation of the cysts was performed together with mebendazole treatment and histopathologic examination confirmed hydatidosis. CONCLUSION: This unusual disease should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of sacroiliac pain and sciatica, especially in endemic areas.
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ranking = 6
keywords = sacrum
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13/25. chiropractic management of patients with bilateral congenital hip dislocation with chronic low back and leg pain.

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss conservative methods for treating patients with chronic low back and leg pain associated with the biomechanical and postural alterations related to bilateral congenital hip dislocation. CLINICAL FEATURES: This report describes the cases of 2 adult female subjects with bilateral congenital hip dislocation without acetabula formation who suffered from chronic low back and leg pain managed conservatively by chiropractic methods. The first subject is a 45-year-old woman with a 9-month history of right buttock pain and radiating right leg pain and paresthesia down to the first 2 toes, with a diagnosis of a herniated L4 intervertebral disk. The second subject is a 53-year-old woman who complained of chronic intermittent low back pain and constant unremitting pain on her right leg for the last 3 years. INTERVENTION AND OUTCOME: chiropractic manipulation utilizing Logan Basic apex and double notch contacts, as well as sacroiliac manipulation on a drop table with a sacrum contact and with a posterior to anterior and superior to inferior (PA-SI) rocking thrust, together with a spinal stabilization exercise program, were used on these 2 patients. Both patients had significant clinical improvement, with reduction on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) of 67% and 84%, Oswestry Disability Index improvement of 73% and 81%, and an improvement on the Harris hip score of 71% and 44%, respectively. CONCLUSION: A conservative management approach, including specific chiropractic manipulation and a spinal stabilization exercise program, can help manage the treatment of adult patients with chronic low back and leg pain related to bilateral congenital dislocation of the hips.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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14/25. fatigue fracture of the sacrum in an adolescent.

    There are relatively few reports of sacral stress fractures in children. In adolescents, sacral stress fractures have been reported in patients involved in vigorous athletic activity. Recognition of these fractures is important to avoid unnecessary biopsy if the findings are confused with tumor or infection. We report a sacral fatigue fracture in a 15-year-old without a history of athletic participation or trauma.
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ranking = 4
keywords = sacrum
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15/25. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as a sacral tumor. Report of two cases.

    Primary lymphomas of the sacrum are rare tumors, reported only in a few cases in the literature. The authors describe two patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphomas presenting as a sacral tumor. In the first case a 52-year-old man presented with progressive back pain, bilateral radicular pain, and saddle block anesthesia secondary to a lytic, expansile soft-tissue mass. The mass arose from the sacrum and eroded through the right S-1 to S-4 foramina and extended into the epidural space of the spinal canal. On magnetic resonance imaging, the sacral mass enhanced homogeneously with Gd. In the second case a 64-year-old man presented with left-sided radicular pain, paresthesias, and progressive weakness due to a lytic soft-tissue mass in the left sacral ala extending into the left L-5 and S-1 foramina. Metastatic workup in each patient demonstrated unremarkable findings. In both cases, an open biopsy procedure was performed after nondiagnostic examination of needle biopsy samples. Histopathological examination showed evidence consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in both patients. In the first case the disease was classified as Stage IAE, and the patient subsequently underwent four cycles of cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisone (CHOP)- and rituximab-based chemotherapy followed by consolidation radiotherapy. In the second case the disease was also classified as Stage IAE, and the patient underwent CHOP-based chemotherapy and consolidation radiotherapy. In both cases radiography demonstrated a decrease in size of the sacral lymphomas. The authors review the clinical, radiological, and histological features of sacral lymphomas. lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sacral tumors.
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ranking = 2
keywords = sacrum
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16/25. Nerve sheath tumors involving the sacrum. Case report and classification scheme.

    Nerve sheath tumors that involve the sacrum are rare. Delayed presentation is common because of their slow-growing nature, the permissive surrounding anatomical environment, and nonspecific symptoms. Consequently, these tumors are usually of considerable size at the time of diagnosis. The authors discuss a case of a sacral nerve sheath tumor. They also propose a classification scheme for these tumors based on their location with respect to the sacrum into three types (Types I-III). Type I tumors are confined to the sacrum; Type II originate within the sacrum but then locally metastasize through the anterior and posterior sacral walls into the presacral and subcutaneous spaces, respectively; and Type III are located primarily in the presacral/retroperitoneal area. The overwhelming majority of sacral nerve sheath tumors are schwannomas. Neurofibromas and malignant nerve sheath tumors are exceedingly rare. Regardless of their histological features, the goal of treatment is complete excision. Adjuvant radiotherapy may be used in patients in whom resection was subtotal. Approaches to the sacrum can generally be classified as anterior or posterior. Type I tumors may be resected via a posterior approach alone, Type III may require an anterior approach, and Type II tumors usually require combined anterior-posterior surgery.
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ranking = 9
keywords = sacrum
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17/25. Stress fracture of the pelvic wing-sacrum after long-level lumbosacral fusion: a case report.

    STUDY DESIGN: A case report of transverse stress fracture of the pelvic wing-sacrum after long-level lumbosacral fusion. OBJECTIVE: To report this rare complication of long-level lumbosacral fusion. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: There are a number of well-described complications of instrumented lumbosacral fusion, including delayed stress fracture of the pelvis. A bilateral pelvic wing-sacrum transverse stress fracture after long-level lumbosacral fusion has not been previously reported to our knowledge. methods: radiography and computed tomography were used to confirm the diagnosis. Long lumbosacral fusion and a pelvic wing-sacrum fracture were shown. RESULTS: A 48-year-old woman underwent several revision spinal surgeries for collapse or instability occurring at the adjacent levels. She presented with low back and bilateral buttock pain with slow progression after last surgery. A bilateral transverse pelvic wing-sacrum stress fracture was found on plain radiographs 7 months later. CONCLUSIONS: Stress fracture of bilateral pelvic wing-sacrum can occur as a potential source of late pain after long fusions of the lumbosacral spine. A better understanding of the related biomechanical forces and preoperative risk factors may identify patients at risk and may aid in surgical planning.There are few reports of pelvic stress fracture as a complication of lumbosacral fusion, and it is typically described as a late occurrence. We present the occurrence of a bilateral pelvic wing-sacrum transverse stress fracture, not previously discussed to our knowledge.
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ranking = 10
keywords = sacrum
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18/25. Solitary plasmacytoma of bone: an unusual cause of severe sacral pain in a young man.

    A 35-year-old man presented with insidious onset of severe sacral pain. Plain radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large, locally invasive mass within the sacrum. Skeletal scintigraphy showed marked hyperemia and minimal peripheral osteoblastic activity of the sacral mass. An F-18 FDG PET study was performed for further assessment and clinical staging. The mass demonstrated high glucose avidity consistent with a high-grade tumor. Histologic examination confirmed the lesion to be a plasmacytoma. Solitary plasmacytoma of bone occurs predominantly in older patients involving the axial skeleton. This case is interesting in view of the large dimension, sacral involvement, the young age of the patient, and the appearance of this lesion across multiple imaging modalities.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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19/25. High-grade dysplastic spondylolisthesis and spondyloptosis: report of three cases with surgical treatment and review of the literature.

    High-grade dysplastic spondylolisthesis is extremely rare and always involves the L5-S1 level. It is attributed to congenital dysplasia of the superior articular process of the sacrum. It can remain asymptomatic for a long time and can progress to a more severe grade of olisthesis and spondyloptosis. Surgical treatment has varied from posterior-only in situ fusion to anterior and posterior fusion with complete reduction. Three cases of symptomatic high-grade (4th and 5th grade) dysplastic spondylolisthesis treated surgically with reduction and fusion are presented. Interbody fusion at the level of olisthesis is crucial.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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20/25. Sacral stress fracture: an unusual cause of low back pain in an amateur tennis player.

    Stress fractures are common in athletes, and their incidence in sport is estimated at 2-4%. A case is reported of a stress fracture of the sacrum in an amateur tennis player. The patient was treated with rest and physiotherapy, focusing on stretching programmes and analgesic treatments, followed by an educational programme of tennis training and muscle strengthening. This appears to be the first report of this pathology in a tennis player.
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ranking = 1
keywords = sacrum
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