Cases reported "Lung Abscess"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/3. Response of complicated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus endocarditis to the addition of trovafloxacin.

    The newer fluoroquinolones have many properties such as safety, bioavailability, and tissue penetration that make them attractive in the therapy of complicated infections. Unfortunately, the rapid development of resistance by Staphylococcus aureus to ciprofloxacin has dampened interest in these agents for serious staphylococcal infections. A patient with right-sided methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) endocarditis with a complicated clinical course received trovafloxacin in addition to vancomycin and rifampin. He was initially treated with vancomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin for serious MRSA infection, but because of complications, including septic central nervous system emboli, persistent fever, and leukocytosis, gentamicin was stopped and trovafloxacin begun. After this addition the patient improved and completely recovered. in vitro and animal model data show that many newer fluoroquinolones have excellent activity against S. aureus, including MRSA, and are also less likely to induce resistance. Animal models of endocarditis support their efficacy in serious staphylococcal infections.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/3. rhodococcus equi: an emerging opportunistic pathogen?

    Human infection with rhodococcus equi is apparently rare with most published reports describing the development of lung abscesses in immunocompromised hosts. Of only 18 cases of infection previously recorded, four have recently occurred in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In australasia, R. equi has frequently been isolated from soil and infected farm animals yet no human infections have been reported thus far. Three cases of R. equi infection have occurred in new zealand and, collectively, they cover a wider spectrum of disease than that previously recognised. The natural history of R. equi infections, their clinical features and treatment are described in the light of our recent experience.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/3. lung abscess due to corynebacterium equi in a renal transplant recipient.

    A case of corynebacterium equi infection in a renal transplant recipient is reported. This not uncommon pathogen of farm animals caused a lung abscess in a graft recipient who had received continuous immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone for seven years. Antibiotic therapy yielded radiological improvement, although the patient died from other causes. C. equi joins a growing list of rare opportunistic organisms which may cause disease in subjects who have received transplants.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = animal
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Lung Abscess'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.