Cases reported "Lung Diseases, Parasitic"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/19. Pulmonary strongyloidiasis--case report of 2 cases.

    strongyloidiasis is a benign gastrointestinal infection. It can pass through the lungs and induce pulmonary strongyloidiasis. The suspicion of pulmonary involvement begins with clinical and chest radiographic features in the patients at risk. They are as follows: chronic lung diseases, age was 65 years, altered cellular immunity, and use of corticosteroids. Definitive diagnosis is made by identification of strongyloides in the secretion or tissue of the respiratory tract. We present 2 patients with pulmonary strongyloidiasis in this research. These 2 cases were patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; both patients were more than 65 years old. They had the risk factors for severe strongyloides infection (advanced age, use of corticosteroids, an high serum cortisol level), worsening of pulmonary symptoms (e.g., dyspnea, cough, sputum production) and abnormal radiographic findings. strongyloides stercoralis was found in the sputum and stool, and pulmonary strongyloidiasis was diagnosed. mebendazole 100 mg twice daily was used and this eliminated the parasite from the stool in case 1, and from the sputum in case 2. Unfortunately, there was a relapse of parasite infection in case 1 and it also induced pulmonary strongyloidiasis. Finally, he died of respiratory failure. Since this disorder has a high relapse rate (15%), serial follow-up of stool and sputum is very important.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = strongyloides, stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/19. Cutaneous strongyloides stercoralis infection: an unusual presentation.

    strongyloides stercoralis is a widespread, soil-transmitted, intestinal nematode common in tropical and subtropical countries. The parasite is unique in its capability to carry out its entire life cycle inside the human body. Human beings contract strongyloidiasis by penetration of filariform larvae into the skin or mucous membrane after contact with contaminated soil. The larvae travel by the venous systems to the lungs, then ascend the bronchi to the trachea, where the larvae are coughed up by the human host, subsequently swallowed, and attain their habitat in the small intestine. Chronic strongyloidiasis acquired in endemic areas may last decades and gives rise to various dermatologic lesions, the most characteristic of which is larva currens, a serpiginous, creeping urticarial eruption. In disseminated strongyloidiasis, the characteristic skin lesions are widespread petechiae and purpura. We present a case of disseminated strongyloidiasis with an unusual manifestation mimicking a drug rash and review the dermatologic manifestations of strongyloidiasis infestation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3970294678322
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/19. strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in a patient with angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy.

    A 29 year old Bengali male patient on chemotherapy for angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy developed Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome 3 months after being treated with a single 3 day course of thiabendazole. His complicated hospitalization and successful management are described. Prevention of this potentially fatal disease in immunocompromised patients by early diagnosis and proper management of intestinal strongyloidiasis is emphasized.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1176235742658
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/19. An unusual cause of pulmonary haemorrhage in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary haemorrhage is a rare presentation of strongyloides hyperinfection. CLINICAL PICTURE: A 69-year-old female patient with rheumatoid arthritis on methotrexate and prednisolone presented with severe community acquired pneumonia. Intravenous trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole (bactrim) and high dose hydrocortisone for pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were commenced. She developed pulmonary haemorrhage 2 weeks later and bronchoalveolar lavage cytology revealed helminthic larvae identified as strongyloides. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME: Despite treatment with ivermectin and albendazole with rapid tailing down of hydrocortisone, she succumbed to her illness. CONCLUSIONS: Strongyloides hyperinfection should be considered in an immunocompromised patient on high dose corticosteroid presenting with pulmonary haemorrhage. prognosis remains dismal as supported by our case report and current literature.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.72059410643355
keywords = strongyloides
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/19. Pulmonary strongyloidiasis in a patient receiving prednisolone therapy.

    strongyloidiasis is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical areas. Disseminated strongyloidiasis may develop in patients with immunodeficiencies. In the absence of early diagnosis and treatment, the prognosis of disseminated strongyloidiasis is extremely poor. We report a case of pulmonary strongyloidiasis that was successfully treated. The patient was an 83-year-old woman who had been receiving long-term oral prednisolone therapy for uveitis. The patient visited our emergency department complaining of breathing difficulties and diarrhea. A chest X-ray revealed a diffuse enhancement of interstitial shadows. A bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed, and both Gram staining and Grocott's staining revealed the presence of multiple filariform larvae of strongyloides stercoralis in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). A stool examination performed at the same time also yielded S. stercoralis. The patient was diagnosed as having pulmonary strongyloidiasis and was treated with thiabendazole and ivermectin, in addition to antimicrobial agents; her respiratory symptoms and diarrhea improved, and S. stercoralis was not detected in subsequent follow-up examinations thereafter. In endemic areas of S. stercoralis, pulmonary strongyloidiasis should be considered as part of a differential diagnosis if chest imaging findings like alveolar and interstitial shadow patterns or lobar pneumonia are seen in patients with immunodeficiencies.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.1176235742658
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/19. An unusual cause of alveolar hemorrhage post hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is being increasingly used in cancer therapy. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, an early complication of stem cell transplant, results from bacterial, viral and fungal infections, coagulopathy, and engraftment syndrome, or can be idiopathic. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in stem cell transplant patients has been rarely reported. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe an unusual cause of alveolar hemorrhage post hematopoietic stem cell transplant due to Strongyloides hyperinfection. Therapy with parenteral ivermectin and thiabendazole was initiated but the patient deteriorated and died of respiratory failure and septic shock. CONCLUSION: strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection is an unusual cause of alveolar hemorrhage early after hematopoietic stem cell transplant with very high mortality.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.55881178713289
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/19. Mixed pulmonary infection with strongyloides stercoralis and blastomyces dermatitidis.

    We report the first case of mixed pulmonary infection with strongyloides stercoralis and blastomyces dermatitidis. Histopathology from the lung biopsy showed structures consistent with B. dermatitidis and S. stercoralis. A parasitology exam from a bronchi alveolar lavage yielded an immature rhabditiform larva and female worm. Fungal cultures grew B. dermatitidis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.6764353613987
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/19. Fatal adult respiratory distress syndrome following successful treatment of pulmonary strongyloidiasis.

    Hyperinfection with strongyloides stercoralis occurs mostly in immunocompromised patients, including those treated with systemic steroids. A case of Strongyloides-induced adult respiratory distress syndrome was recently reported, and we now report a case in which fatal ARDS appeared to result from the successful therapy of massive parasitic infection.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.27940589356645
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/19. Disseminated strongyloidiasis in AIDS: uncommon but important.

    Disseminated strongyloides stercoralis infection is a rare and severe but treatable complication of AIDS. We present a case where this infection was successfully treated and review the available literature. Cases may present many years after they have left an area endemic for Strongyloides infection, emphasizing the need for a full travel history. Symptoms are typically gastrointestinal and pulmonary, with infiltrates often seen on chest radiography. Diagnosis requires stool examination and biopsy of affected sites. Treatment with repeated courses of thiabendazole (25 mg/kg twice daily for 5 days) was successful in our case, but maintenance regimens have not yet been defined. The relative rarity of this complication of AIDS suggests that, where both infections are present, disseminated strongyloidiasis only arises either when hiv-induced immunodeficiency is profound or, possibly, when it is accompanied by impaired granulopoiesis.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.27940589356645
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/19. Pulmonary hyperinfection syndrome with strongyloides stercoralis.

    A 65-year-old man with steroid-dependent chronic airflow obstruction presented with progressive dyspnea and weight loss. travel history included a military tour in southeast asia. A chest roentgenogram revealed hyperexpanded lung fields with diffusely increased interstitial markings. The Papanicolaou stain of expectorated sputum demonstrated the rhabditiform larvae of strongyloides stercoralis. Endemic areas of infection include the southeastern united states, puerto rico, central america, the Pacific basin, and central africa. In recent immigrant groups and veterans of the vietnam conflict, rates of infection are as high as 6 percent. The hyperinfection syndrome occurs in immunocompromised hosts and is associated with glucocorticoid steroid therapy. This allows massive proliferation of larval forms. Clinical clues include an appropriate travel history (even in the remote past), gastrointestinal symptoms, cutaneous symptoms, eosinophilia, or thrombocytosis. Our patient demonstrated a classic presentation of the hyperinfection syndrome, and the condition responded well to thiabendazole.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3970294678322
keywords = stercoralis
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Lung Diseases, Parasitic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.