Cases reported "Lung Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/78. Flitting radiographic shadows: an unusual presentation of cancer in the lungs.

    Tumour involvement of pulmonary blood vessels occurs frequently in advanced lung cancer and occasionally may cause pulmonary infarction. A case is reported of diffuse obstruction of pulmonary arteries by cancer in which no primary tumour was found, and which presented as flitting radiographic opacities due to pulmonary infarction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = pulmonary infarction, infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/78. Both atrial resection and superior vena cava replacement in sleeve pneumonectomy for advanced lung cancer.

    Extended sleeve pneumonectomy including removal of the superior vena cava, right atrium and parts of left atrium on cardiopulmonary bypass was successfully performed in a 40-year-old man. The tumour was histologically proven a T4 N1 stage with margins free from tumour. Adjuvant radiochemotherapy was administered postoperatively on an outpatient base. The patient did well for 7 months then he died from myocardial infarction due to metastatic infiltration of the right coronary artery. Other metastatic deposits were not found at autopsy. More data from extended pulmonary resections are required to demonstrate a benefit.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00025118532999553
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/78. lung metastases manifesting as pulmonary infarction by mucin and tumor embolization: radiographic, high-resolution CT, and pathologic findings.

    We present a case of lung metastasis manifesting as lung infarction by mucin and tumor embolization. The radiograph and high-resolution CT showed multiple focal consolidations with ground glass attenuation in subpleural areas of both lungs. diagnosis was made by open lung biopsy, which revealed pulmonary infarction caused by intravascular adenocarcinoma with numerous mucus emboli in pulmonary arteries. Subpleurally located consolidations on high-resolution CT correlated well with the histologic findings of lung infarction by mucin and tumor emboli.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2.50050237066
keywords = pulmonary infarction, infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/78. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma of the uterus: histologic and immunohistochemical characterization of primary and metastatic lesions.

    Benign uterine leiomyoma metastasizing to the lung is a recognized entity that has been reported infrequently in the medical literature. There is persisting controversy regarding the pathogenesis and biology of these lesions. We report a well-studied and well-characterized case of benign leiomyoma metastasizing to the lung. The patient was a 72-year-old woman with an enlarged uterus that contained several leiomyomas with usual histology. Areas of fibrosis, hyalinization, edema, and focal infarction together with small foci with mildly increased cellularity and minimal nuclear pleomorphism were seen. Careful and repeated mitotic counts ranged from 0 to 2 mitoses per 10 high-power fields. In summary, based on histopathologic criteria, the neoplasm was determined to be a focally cellular benign leiomyoma. Four years later, the patient underwent surgical resection of a single nodule in the lung, which had been detected on routine radiographs. Histopathologic evaluation showed a low-grade leiomyosarcoma with moderate nuclear pleomorphism, necrosis, and brisk mitotic activity. Immunohistochemical studies performed on both neoplasms showed them to be of mesenchymal derivation with smooth muscle differentiation. Both neoplasms expressed estrogen receptors with moderate to strong intensity. The patient received no further treatment and, to date, shows no evidence of recurrent disease. The diagnosis of benign metastasizing leiomyoma can only be made with certainty after careful and extensive sampling of the primary tumor to exclude small foci of sarcoma and of the pulmonary tumor to rule out a primary neoplasm. Although it is biologically peculiar, benign metastasizing leiomyoma should continue to be recognized as a distinct entity because current morphologic criteria do not allow primary myometrial tumors to be reclassified as leiomyomas of uncertain malignant potential even if they have metastasized to the lung.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00025118532999553
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/78. Multiple pulmonary infarctions associated with lung cancer.

    We present a case of right lung adenosquamous cell carcinoma that had obstructed the main pulmonary artery and superior pulmonary vein, causing multiple pulmonary infarctions in the right upper and middle lobes. Multiple peripheral pulmonary nodules showed clinical features that are characteristic of pulmonary infarction: rapid appearance and gradual reduction in size, pleural-based parenchymal density with a truncated apex and a round nodular shadow with a blurred margin and a centrally directed linear shadow. The nodules were more intense than the primary tumor in both T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We conclude that pulmonary infarction can look like a nodule when lung cancer invades both the pulmonary artery and vein and that such cases can be distinguished from pulmonary metastasis by MRI, computed tomography and a series of radiological examinations.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 3.5
keywords = pulmonary infarction, infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/78. disseminated intravascular coagulation in a lung cancer patient after acute myocardial infarction.

    A 70-year-old man with adenocarcinoma of the lung suffered from an attack of acute myocardial infarction during hospitalization. Eleven days after the heart attack, clinically obvious disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) occurred. The intravascular coagulation abnormalities progressed and eventually the patient died. We suspect that both lung adenocarcinoma and the insult of myocardial infarction may have contributed to the development of DIC in this patient.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0015071119799732
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/78. nephrotic syndrome and mesenteric infarction secondary to metastatic mesothelioma.

    Malignant mesothelioma can present insidiously with progressive breathlessness and chest pain. Paraneoplastic, or non-chest related, presentations are very rare. The case of an elderly man with occupational exposure to asbestos who presented with nephrotic syndrome due to minimal change nephropathy in the context of advanced pleural mesothelial malignancy is reported.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.0010047413199821
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/78. Coexistence of lung cancer and hamartoma.

    We present a rare case of a synchronous primary lung cancer adjacent to a hamartoma. A 71-year-old woman was admitted with congestive heart failure due to acute myocardial infarction. A chest radiogram on admission showed pulmonary edema with a tumor shadow in the right upper lung field. Because histological diagnosis was not obtained preoperatively, a wedge resection of the lung was conducted using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. The histopathological examination confirmed the coexistence of an adenocarcinoma with a chondromatous hamartoma. Right upper lobectomy was performed followed by excision of the mediastinal lymph nodes. Although hamartoma is generally considered to be a benign neoplasm, there have been several reports of increased risk to lung cancer in patients with a chondromatous hamartoma. Therefore, we recommend that patients with a hamartoma should be submitted to a complete evaluation and to regular follow-up, considering the risk to associated synchronous malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00025118532999553
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/78. Minimally invasive surgery for lung cancer with coronary artery disease.

    We report a 69-year-old woman with lung cancer and severe stenosis in the left anterior descending coronary artery. To perform a curative operation for the lung cancer without myocardial infarction, minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass and left lower lobectomy with video-endoscopic assistance were performed simultaneously. There was no major complication, and she was discharged at 14 days after the operation. This procedure may be useful and safe for patients with lung cancer and coronary artery disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00025118532999553
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/78. Electrocardiographic manifestations of heart metastasis from a primary lung cancer.

    Though acute myocardial infarction is one of the most frequent causes of ST segment elevation, there are other, less frequent, reasons for such electrocardiographic changes. In the present case, a cardiac metastasis from a squamous cell lung carcinoma was responsible for these changes. The secondary lesion was located in the apex of the left ventricle and induced an ECG alteration mimicking myocardial ischaemia. The literature includes few reports that describe the relation between electrocardiographic changes and heart metastases, since heart metastases are not usually discovered except at autopsy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.00025118532999553
keywords = infarction
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Lung Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.