Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/7. ovulation induction and early pregnancy loss in a woman susceptible to autoimmune diseases: a possible interrelationship.

    We report a 34-year-old woman with sequentially occurring autoimmune diseases that are possibly triggered by numerous ovulation inductions. At the ages of 26-32 years, she experienced 27 uncontrolled ovulation induction cycles using clomiphene citrate (CC) or CC plus human menopausal gonadotropin plus human chorionic gonadotropin. She became pregnant at the ages of 27, 30 and 31 with subsequent pregnancy loss in the 28th, 8th and 10th week of gestation, respectively. insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) developed at the age of 28. During the second year of ovulation induction, at the age of 27, she developed arthralgia that worsened and became migratory from the age of 31. thrombocytopenia appeared at the age of 33. The diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was established at the age of 34. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of concurrent IDDM, SLE and APS in a patient associated with ovulation inductions. Excessive levels of estradiol achieved during the ovulation inductions could play a role in the expression of multiple autoimmune diseases in the susceptible woman.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/7. A case of lupus peritonitis and cystitis after ovulation induction therapy.

    We report a patient in whom lupus peritonitis and cystitis developed after ovulation induction therapy with human menopausal and chorionic gonadotropins followed by in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. The lupus peritonitis and cystitis presented clinically as an acute abdomen. This disease should not be misdiagnosed as a nonspecific or infectious pelvic peritonitis, especially after oocyte retrieval.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/7. Endometrial carcinoma following chronic anovulation in a premenopausal woman with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Endometrial carcinoma was diagnosed in a premenopausal woman suffering with systemic lupus erythematosus. She had received both prednisolone and an immunosuppressive agent for more than 10 years. Anovulatory cycles persisted during drug administration, along with dysfunctional uterine bleeding. The serum estrogen: progesterone ratio was high. Repeated endometrial biopsies revealed a progression of change from benign proliferation to cystic hyperplasia, adenomatous hyperplasia, atypical hyperplasia and invasive adenocarcinoma. These clinical data suggest that a result of long-term unopposed endogenous estrogen can have been the cause of the endometrial carcinoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.8
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/7. An infected ovarian hematoma as the presenting symptom of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and an associated coagulation defect presented with the clinical picture of an inflammatory pelvic mass. The laboratory data led to the diagnosis of SLE. A laparotomy revealed an infected hematoma of the left ovary. The SLE-induced coagulation deficit may have caused an intraovarian hematoma at the time of ovulation that became infected secondarily and led to an inflammatory pelvic mass as the first sign of SLE.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.2
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/7. Systemic lupus erythematosus induced by ovulation induction treatment.

    Infertile women are treated with various regimens for ovulation induction. The ultimate end-result of these treatments is a significant rise in levels of serum gonadotropins and estradiol--the most potent natural estrogen. estrogens may affect diverse biologic functions, including immune and inflammatory reactions. A role for estrogens in the development or exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been suggested by many studies. In this report, we present 3 cases of otherwise healthy women who received ovulation induction agents and subsequently developed full-blown SLE. The possible association between this treatment and SLE is discussed.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/7. Risks of ovulation-induction therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    We report on four women with systemic lupus erythematosus who developed two types of complications after ovulation-induction therapy for primary or secondary infertility. Primary infertility was associated with endometriosis in one patient. Three had previously known systemic lupus erythematosus. All had inactive disease at onset of ovulation-induction therapy. Three patients developed symptoms consistent with moderate lupus flare a few weeks after the onset of ovulation-induction therapy. One patient developed inferior vena cava and unilateral left renal vein thrombosis. No patient became pregnant. A high oestrogen level induced by ovulation-induction therapy may explain the occurrence of lupus flare in patients with prior inactive lupus. All our patients had prior asymptomatic antiphospholipid antibodies. One patient developed a major thrombotic event. The presence of antiphospholipid antibodies increases the thrombotic risk related to ovulation-induction therapy. We conclude that ovulation-induction therapy should be restricted to patients with long-standing inactive systemic lupus erythematosus. A preventive increase of the corticosteroid dosage should be proposed in addition to heparin or antiaggregant therapy for those with prior asymptomatic antiphospholipid antibodies, or with heparin therapy for those with prior antiphospholipid antibody-related events.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 2
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/7. Fatal exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus after induction of ovulation.

    It is well known that sex hormones can regulate the course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We describe a young woman who had a fatal exacerbation of SLE after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for induction of ovulation. We recommend careful attention to the immunological status of the infertile women before starting any ovulation inducing treatment for assisted reproduction.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.2
keywords = ovulation
(Clic here for more details about this article)


Leave a message about 'Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.