Cases reported "Lyme Disease"

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21/162. Dual infection: tularemia and Lyme borreliosis acquired by single tick bite in northwest croatia.

    A case of dual infection, tularemia and Lyme borreliosis acquired by a single tick bite in northwest croatia is presented. The patient came from a highly endemic region for Lyme borreliosis, where 45% of the ticks are infected with borrelia burgdorferi. Clinically, tularemia manifested as the ulceroglandular form, and Lyme borreliosis manifested with arthritis (knee). Both diseases responded well to combined antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 1
keywords = borreliosis
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22/162. Complex regional pain syndrome and lyme borreliosis: two different diseases?

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a frequent complication appearing as pain of unexplained pathogenesis. Its association with Lyme borreliosis (LB) is fairly rare. In the presented clinical case, clinical features as well as the findings of radiological, radionuclide, neurophysiological and serological investigations pointed to an association between the two conditions. The patient fulfilled the criteria for both diagnoses, i.e. CRPS and LB. The subsequent antibiotic therapy resulted in a complete remission of both clinical entities.
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ranking = 3.8144938903364
keywords = lyme, lyme borreliosis, borreliosis
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23/162. Activation of latent Lyme borreliosis concurrent with a herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    The case is reported of a 26-y-old woman with latent Lyme borreliosis that was concurrently activated with a herpes simplex virus type 1 infection. Immune suppression by stress may have caused activation of both infections.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = borreliosis
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24/162. anetoderma: another facet of lyme disease?

    lyme disease has been suspected to be one cause of secondary anetoderma. We present a 25-year-old male patient with multiple lesions of anetoderma with a diameter of up to 2 cm that developed within the last 4 weeks without subjective symptoms. The histopathologic pattern was similar to the inflammatory stage of acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans. polymerase chain reaction analysis out of the paraffin-embedded tissue, confirmed by sequencing of the obtained nucleotide product, revealed a part of the 23 S ribosomal rna gene of borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed an increased serum IgG titer against B burgdorferi corroborated by Western blot analysis. After a treatment with oral doxycycline (100 mg twice a day) for 30 days the anti-B burgdorferi titer decreased significantly and no new lesions appeared. Some cases of anetoderma might be caused by Borrelia and patients with anetoderma should be examined for borreliosis including serology and polymerase chain reaction of lesional skin. In cases of Borrelia-induced anetoderma, early antibiotic treatment could prevent further progression of the disfiguring skin lesions and the underlying disease.
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ranking = 0.98572486729954
keywords = lyme, borreliosis
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25/162. Complete heart block due to lyme carditis.

    Lyme carditis is becoming a more frequent complication of lyme disease, primarily due to the increasing incidence of this disease in the united states. Cardiovascular manifestations of lyme disease often occur within 21 days of exposure and include fluctuating degrees of atrioventricular (AV) block, acute myopericarditis or mild left ventricular dysfunction and rarely cardiomegaly or fatal pericarditis. AV block can vary from first-, second-, third-degree heart block, to junctional rhythm and asystolic pauses. patients with suspected or known lyme disease presenting with cardiac symptoms, or patients in an endemic area presenting with cardiac symptoms with no other cardiac risk factors should have a screening electrocardiogram along with Lyme titers. We present a case of third-degree AV block due to Lyme carditis, illustrating one of the cardiac complications of lyme disease. This disease is usually self-limiting when treated appropriately with antibiotics, and does not require permanent cardiac pacing.
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ranking = 1.6857354488848
keywords = lyme
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26/162. Transverse myelitis secondary to coexistent lyme disease and babesiosis.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe transverse myelitis secondary to coexistent lyme disease and babesiosis. METHOD: Case report. BACKGROUND: A 74-year-old man presented with rapid onset of weakness, numbness, and tingling in his legs, with symptoms ascending to his hands and forearms within days. He recalled an insect bite to his scapular area 2 weeks earlier. FINDINGS: T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated diffuse hyperintensity from T1 through T12. Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay identified infection with borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochete responsible for lyme disease. Giemsa-stained blood smears identified ring forms later recognized by polymerase chain reaction as babesia microti, the piroplasm responsible for babesiosis. Initial examination revealed C7 motor and T3 sensory complete tetraplegia, with recovery to T4 paraplegia by 2 months. CONCLUSION: The history, physical examination, imaging, and serologic studies were consistent with transverse myelitis related to lyme disease and babesiosis. The severity and permanence of this patient's deficits were greater than those reported in the majority of previous cases of transverse myelitis due to lyme disease alone, suggesting a possible role for coinfection with babesiosis.
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ranking = 0.4214338622212
keywords = lyme
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27/162. Coexistence of antibodies to tick-borne agents of babesiosis and Lyme borreliosis in patients from Cotia county, State of Sao Paulo, brazil.

    This paper reports a case of coinfection caused by pathogens of lyme disease and babesiosis in brothers. This was the first case of borreliosis in brazil, acquired in Cotia County, State of S o Paulo, brazil. Both children had tick bite history, presented erythema migrans, fever, arthralgia, mialgia, and developed positive serology (ELISA and Western-blotting) directed to borrelia burgdorferi G 39/40 and babesia bovis antigens, mainly of IgM class antibodies, suggestive of acute disease. Also, high frequencies of antibodies to B. bovis was observed in a group of 59 Brazilian patients with Lyme borreliosis (25.4%), when compared with that obtained in a normal control group (10.2%) (chi-square = 5.6; p < 0.05). Interestingly, both children presented the highest titers for IgM antibodies directed to both infective diseases, among all patients with Lyme borreliosis.
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ranking = 1
keywords = borreliosis
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28/162. Lyme-associated parkinsonism: a neuropathologic case study and review of the literature.

    Neurological complications of lyme disease include meningitis, encephalitis, dementia, and, rarely, parkinsonism. We present a case of striatonigral degeneration, a form of multiple system atrophy, in Lyme-associated parkinsonism. A 63-year-old man presented with erythema migrans rash, joint pains, and tremors. serum and cerebrospinal fluid antibodies and polymerase chain reaction for borrelia burgdorferi were positive. Clinical parkinsonism was diagnosed by several neurologists. Despite treatment, the patient continued to decline, with progressive disability, cognitive dysfunction, rigidity, and pulmonary failure. At autopsy, the brain showed mild basal ganglia atrophy and substantia nigra depigmentation, with extensive striatal and substantia nigral neuronal loss and astrogliosis. No lewy bodies were identified; however, ubiquitin-positive glial cytoplasmic inclusions were identified in striatal and nigral oligodendroglia. There were no perivascular or meningeal infiltrates, the classic findings of neuroborreliosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of striatonigral degeneration in a patient with B burgdorferi infection of the central nervous system and clinical Lyme-associated parkinsonism.
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ranking = 0.56429100507834
keywords = lyme, borreliosis
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29/162. anetoderma and borreliosis: is there a pathogenetic relationship?

    A 32-year-old man simultaneously developed anetoderma and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans on his left arm and showed a positive serology for borreliosis with ELISA and Western Blot tests. In addition, a 45 year-old man is presented with anetoderma without any associated systemic or cutaneous diseases, with B. afzelii confirmed as a singular causality through serology (ELISA, Western Blot) and amplification of B. afzelii-specific dna from the skin by PCR. These two observations highly suggest that anetoderma can be the result of an infection with B. afzelii. We conclude that in patients with anetoderma a serological investigation for Borreliosis should be performed.
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ranking = 0.71428571428571
keywords = borreliosis
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30/162. Inflammatory signs, antibody response and antigen detection in cerebrospinal fluid over the course of neuroborreliosis.

    CSF and serum specimens were consecutively obtained from three patients with neuroborreliosis (stage I, II and III), CSF protein content, cell counts and differential, IgG index, oligoclonal bands and anti-B. burgdorferi antibodies were measured. cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was tested for Borrelia-dna being present prior to and after antibiotic treatment. While dna could be identified before ceftriaxone was administered, there were no more amplification products afterwards. The goal of this study was to compare the usefulness of serodiagnostic methods and the detection of borrelia burgdorferi-dna in patients with clinically confirmed neuroborreliosis to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = borreliosis
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