Cases reported "Lymphangioma, Cystic"

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1/6. Protein-loss into retroperitoneal lymphangioma: demonstration by lymphoscintigraphy and blood-pool scintigraphy with Tc-99m-human serum albumin.

    A rare, benign congenital lymphangioma has been reported to occur frequently in the neck and axilla, but rarely in the retroperitoneal space. We report a case of a retroperitoneal lymphangioma associated with hypoproteinemia caused by protein-loss into the tumor. In this case, lymphoscintigraphy with subcutaneously injected Tc-99m-human serum albumin (HSA) disclosed the communication between the tumor and the lymphatic system, and sequential abdominal scintigraphy with intravenously injected Tc-99m-HSA revealed the protein loss into the tumor. Abdominal scintigraphy with Tc-99m-HSA injected intravenously or subcutaneously is occasionally useful for determining the etiology of hypoproteinemia.
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2/6. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium associated with cervicomediastinal cystic hygroma.

    Chylopericardium is a rare clinical entity in which chylous fluid accumulates in the pericardial cavity. We report a case of primary idiopathic chylopericardium associated with multiple, small cervicomediastinal cystic hygromas occurring in an asymptomatic 43-year-old woman with no history of trauma, thoracic surgery, malignancy, infection or tuberculosis. echocardiography showed a large amount of pericardial effusions and pericardial fluid analysis revealed inappropriately elevated triglyceride. We did not demonstrate communication between the thoracic duct and the pericardial sac by lymphangiography and chest computed tomography. She successfully responded to 30 days of continuous pericardial drainage and 15 days of a medium-chain triglyceride diet after 30 days of total parenteral nutrition. Follow-up echocardiography 6 months after treatment commencement showed a minimal reaccumulation of pericardial fluid without symptom. We conclude that if a patient is asymptomatic and can well tolerate daily life, surgery including pericardiectomy or ligation of the thoracic duct is not necessarily required.
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3/6. Localized cystic subdural hygroma: case report.

    We report a new variant of subdural hygroma previously undocumented in the literature. A 29-year-old man had a skull mass and a progressive headache of 6 to 7 years duration. He was involved in a car crash 8 years earlier and had an unrecognized skull fracture. During surgery the lesion was found to be a localized, cystic subdural hygroma communicating with the subarachnoid space through a narrow opening. This lesion is unique because: (1) the subdural hygroma was limited by an adhesion between the dura and the arachnoid; (2) the actual communication between the subdural hygroma and the subarachnoid space was clearly identified; and (3) localized bulging of the skull is exceptional for a subdural hygroma. Differentiation from more common cystic lesions such as congenital arachnoid cysts, traumatic arachnoid cysts, intradiploic arachnoid cysts, and chronic subdural hematomas is discussed.
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4/6. Case report: giant tuberculous cystic lymphangioma of posterior mediastinum, retroperitoneum and groin.

    Cystic lymphangioma is a very rare condition of unknown aetiology. It is generally regarded as a developmental malformation in which obstruction or agenesis of lymphatic tissue results in lymphangiectasia secondary to lack of normal communication of the lymphatic system. Most lymphangiomas occur in the neck (75%) and axillary region (20%). Lymphangiomas may rarely occur in the retroperitoneum, mediastinum, mesentery, omentum, colon, pelvis, groin, spleen, bone and skin. We present a case of multicompartmental tuberculous lymphangioma extending continuously from the superior posterior mediastinum through the retroperitoneum to the right groin, which responded to needle aspiration and antituberculosis drug therapy.
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5/6. Cystic lymphangioma of the gall-bladder: a case report.

    Intra-abdominal cystic lymphangiomas are rare lesions that can be difficult to diagnose. We present a report of a patient with a giant multilocular cystic lesion in the abdomen. ultrasonography and computed tomography scans of the abdomen revealed that the cyst had originated in the gall-bladder fossa. There was some calcification and thickening of the cyst wall. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated a medially deviated common bile duct, an elongated cystic duct and an inferior compressed gallbladder. There was no apparent communication between the cyst and the biliary tract; however, an abdominal angiogram revealed that the lesion was supplied by a branch of the cystic artery. Histological findings obtained intra-operatively were consistent with a cystic lymphangioma. Its characteristic histology was observed in the subserous layer of the gall-bladder. This case is a rare instance of a cystic lymphangioma originating in the gall-bladder.
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6/6. lymphangioma circumscriptum associated with paravesical cystic retroperitoneal lymphangioma.

    A boy with long-standing congenital cutaneous lymphangioma circumscriptum (LC), presented at the age of 6 years with an episode of painless haematuria, subsequently attributed to bladder wall involvement of a paravesical cystic retroperitoneal lymphangioma. magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated this lymphangioma to be in communication with the cutaneous lesions. Deep lymphatic and visceral involvement is an extremely unusual occurrence in association with LC. This is the first report of an association between LC and cystic retroperitoneal lymphangioma. LC occasionally heralds a deeper, more clinically significant lymphangioma which may not become apparent until many years after the initial dermatological presentation. We report this case to raise awareness of this potential association and to demonstrate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of the deep component of cutaneous lymphangiomas.
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