Cases reported "Lymphangioma"

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1/152. lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue.

    A case is reported of severe transient macroglossia after biopsy from the tongue in a 13-year-old boy who has had intermittent macroglossia since the age of 1 year as a result of extensive lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue. The acute lesions appear to result from haemorrhage into the lymphatic spaces following rupture of blood vessels in connective tissue septa and possibly secondary infection.
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2/152. Acquired vulvar lymphangioma mimicking genital warts. A case report and review of the literature.

    A 44-year-old female developed confluent, dusky red, pruritic labial papules clinically suspected to be genital warts. She had a long-standing history of Crohn's disease with vulvar fistulae. The papular eruption developed after several bouts of cellulitis in a region of vulvar lymphedema. Shave biopsy of a papule exhibited papillated epidermal hyperplasia overlying a dermis with a 'Swiss-cheese' appearance secondary to lymphedema and superficial ectatic thin-walled vascular spaces characteristic of lymphangiectasias. review of published cases reveals that acquired lymphangiomas often affect the vulva compared to other cutaneous sites and can be associated with surgery, radiation therapy, infection (e.g., erysipelas, tuberculosis), Crohn's disease, congenital dysplastic angiopathy and congenital lymphedema. Rather than translucent vesicles ('frog spawn') typical of extragenital cutaneous lymphangiomas, vulvar lymphangiomas often present as verrucous papules that can be mistaken for genital warts. In this case, we believe that the combination of vulvar Crohn's disease and recurrent cellulitis resulted in local lymphatic destruction, lymphedema and ultimately symptomatic lymphangiectasias that mimicked genital warts.
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3/152. Benign lymphangiomatous papules of the skin following radiotherapy: a report of five new cases and review of the literature.

    AIMS: The aim of this report is to summarize the clinicopathological findings of five cases of a pseudosarcomatous vascular proliferation of the skin at the site of radiotherapy following surgery for carcinoma of the breast and carcinoma of the endometrium. To our knowledge, only five cases of this presumably rare pseudomalignant proliferation have been reported previously. methods AND RESULTS: All patients were females ranging in age from 44 to 70 years. The lesions appeared as solitary or multiple papules or vesicles localized to the field of radiation. Microscopically, they were composed of vascular spaces that exhibited atypical features without qualifying for a diagnosis of angiosarcoma. CONCLUSIONS: Our cases provide additional evidence supporting the benign nature of this atypical vascular proliferation, not recurring, never developing metastases and being cured readily by local excision. Clinical, histopathological and ultrastructural findings suggest a lymphatic origin. Whether these lesions represent a neoplastic or a reactive condition secondary to radiotherapy is unclear. The name 'benign lymphangiomatous papules of the skin following radiotherapy' is proposed.
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4/152. Dermal lymphangiomata of the vulva and laser therapy: a case report and literature review.

    Dermal lymphangioma of the vulva is a rare disorder of the lymphatic system. The mainstay of therapy has been vulvectomy. A 65-year-old woman with a remote history of cervical cancer who successfully underwent CO2 laser vaporization for extensive vulva lymphangiomata, and a literature review inclusive of all 28 previously reported cases are described. Ten (35.7%) of these patients had previously received pelvic radiation for cervical cancer, 8 of whom (80%) had also undergone radical hysterectomy. Including the present case, 5 patients, 3 of whom had previously received radiation therapy, have been treated successfully with laser therapy. These data support laser vaporization with retreatment of persistent or recurrent focal disease as the treatment of choice for dermal lymphangiomata. Surgical excision should be reserved for treatment failures. Radical hysterectomy in association with postoperative pelvic radiation therapy appears to be an important, previously unrecognized risk factor for its development.
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5/152. Lymphatic malformation causing intractable chylorrhagia.

    Lymphatic malformation is a developmental error usually noticed at birth or in early childhood. Lesions of the upper leg and lower trunk are the most difficult to remove, because they are often the largest ones encountered and also because they tend to extend proximally into the retroperitoneal tissues. chyle reflux, usually associated with lymphedema of the extremity, has not been reported to be caused by lymphatic malformation. We report a case of intrapelvic retroperitoneal lymphatic malformation with an extension of gluteal-thigh soft-tissue involvement causing intractable chylorrhagia. The tumor was subtotally excised, and the defect was closed by a distally based, peninsular latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The flap served both as a filling material and as a "bridge" between the residual tumor, including abnormal lymphatics, and normal lymph flow.
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keywords = lymphatic
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6/152. Mixed capillary/lymphatic malformation with coexisting port-wine stain: treatment utilizing 3D MRI and CT-guided sclerotherapy.

    BACKGROUND: Lymphatic malformation, a benign malformation of the skin and the subcutaneous tissues, is divided into two major groups: the classical and the localized forms. Pathologically lymphatic malformation often consists of sequestered lymphatic cisterns with thick muscle walls lying deeply in the subcutaneous tissue. Communicating via dermal lymphatic channels with superficial pseudovesicles, they can vary in size depending on the pressure transmitted by the cisterns beneath. methods: We present a patient with mixed capillary/lymphatic malformation and coexisting port-wine stain since birth. To demonstrate the anatomic extent and the subcutaneous involvement we performed a 3D reconstruction of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The diagnostic procedures, therapeutic possibilities, and complications regarding this rare appearance are reviewed. RESULTS: Good results could be obtained with CO2 laser vaporization of the superficial lesions and computed tomography (CT)-guided transcutaneous sclerotherapy for the deeper cisterns with doxycycline. CONCLUSION: The combination of CO2 laser treatment and sclerotherapy with doxycycline seems to present a treatment option for cutaneous and subcutaneous lymphangioma circumscriptum with rare side effects.
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ranking = 8
keywords = lymphatic
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7/152. Lymphocyst: ultrasound diagnosis and urologic management.

    Three cases of lymphocysts occurred in a series of 97 patients undergoing extension pelvic urological operations, an incidence rate of 3.1 per cent. This is the first report of this complication after urological lymphadenectomy. awareness of the entity is important to urologists since lymphatic staging operations for prostate and bladder carcinoma are widely used to help plan definitive therapy. Athough this complication is rare after renal transplantation it may cause significant interference with graft function. The etiology, symptoms, findings, diagnosis and treatment of this condition are reviewed. Echography is presented as an ideal technique to diagnose the condition and to guide in its management.
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ranking = 1
keywords = lymphatic
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8/152. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of lymphangioma of the parotid gland in an adult.

    lymphangioma or cystic hygroma is an uncommon benign congenital tumor of lymphatics that is seen in children and, rarely, adults. lymphangioma primarily involving the parotid gland is an extremely uncommon occurrence in adults. We report on the cytologic findings of a parotid lymphangioma in a 34-yr-old man which showed 13 cc of yellow fluid with red blood cells, lymphocytes, and rare fragments of benign-appearing salivary gland epithelium. The differential diagnosis of cystic parotid gland lesions in adults may include Warthin's tumor, lymphoma, benign lymphoepithelial lesions, branchial cleft cysts, chronic sialadenitis, cystic low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma, and cystic pleomorphic adenoma. In this case, the fine-needle aspiration findings along with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a multiloculated cystic mass in the parotid gland allowed the diagnosis of lymphangioma.
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keywords = lymphatic
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9/152. Severe cyclical thrombocytopenia in a patient with a large lymphatic-venous malformation: a potential association?

    The case is reported of an infant who had a large vascular malformation involving his left arm and axilla. It was initially believed to be purely lymphatic in composition but some venous elements were identified subsequently, at operation. The lesion was unusual in that there was a total absence of skin over one area of it at birth, that it underwent spontaneous shrinkage in the early weeks of life, and that a circumferential scarring developed which led to severe functional disability of the limb. At 12 months of age the patient developed a profound cyclic thrombocytopenia that spontaneously resolved after 1 year. The cause of the platelet cycling is unresolved but might have been secondary to intermittent production by the malformation of a cytokine which was destructive against the platelets.
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ranking = 5
keywords = lymphatic
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10/152. Orbital venous-lymphatic malformations (lymphangiomas) mimicking cavernous hemangiomas.

    PURPOSE: To illustrate that orbital venous-lymphatic malformations (lymphangiomas) may rarely simulate cavernous hemangiomas. methods: Retrospective case review. RESULTS: Five patients were identified from a series of 85 patients with venous-lymphatic malformations. The age range was 21 to 69 years, and all cases presented with a history of slowly progressive or long-standing proptosis. Computerized tomography revealed relatively homogeneous intraconal masses that were well defined anteriorly. Two of the cases had expansion of the orbit, and one had focal calcification. The three who had magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous contrast enhancement. The preoperative diagnosis in every case was cavernous hemangioma, and intraoperatively the lesions resembled cavernous hemangiomas. However, posterior dissection was difficult in all patients because of dense adhesions and, in one case, led to a central retinal artery occlusion. The histology was characteristic of orbital venous-lymphatic malformations in all five cases. CONCLUSIONS: Deep orbital venous-lymphatic malformations presenting in adulthood may be rarely confused with cavernous hemangiomas. In doubtful cases, significant intralesional heterogeneity, best seen on magnetic resonance imaging, and focal calcification may help distinguish the two entities. This differentiation is important, because dissection of venous-lymphatic malformations is fraught with more complications than surgical excision of a cavernous hemangioma.
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ranking = 9
keywords = lymphatic
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