Cases reported "Lymphangioma"

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1/75. Fine needle aspiration cytology of a cervical lymph node lymphangioma in an adult. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: Although the cytologic features of cervical cystic lesions are well established, no cytology reports on lymphangioma in adults have been published. CASE: A 60-year-old male presented with a slowly growing, upper laterocervical, painless enlargement. Fine needle aspiration (FNA) obtained 15 mL of yellowish fluid, consisting predominantly of a uniform population of small and round lymphocytes without mitosis or atypia and with some histiocytes intermingled with them. Some centrocytes and occasionally centroblasts and plasma cells could also be observed. immunohistochemistry performed on cell block sections displayed polyclonal B lymphocytes mixed with T cells. The specimen showed a clearly circumscribed, 50-mm, cystic lesion with a multilocular appearance and abundant, yellowish liquid. Microscopic examination demonstrated cystic lymphangioma arising from the medullary portion of a lymph node. CONCLUSION: FNA cytology permits a suggested diagnosis of lymphangioma. This is one of the few reports of FNA cytology of lymphangioma and, to the best of our knowledge, this entity has not previously been found as a neck mass in an adult.
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2/75. proteus syndrome: craniofacial and cerebral MRI.

    The proteus syndrome is a rare hamartoneoplastic syndrome that may affect the brain, skull, and extracranial head and neck. We present a case with severe, characteristic findings. Brain abnormalities are not common in proteus syndrome; when present, hemimegalencephaly and migrational disorders are typically seen, commonly with an associated seizure disorder. Maxillary and mandibular dysmorphism may occur, including unilateral condylar hyperplasia. Subcutaneous fatty, fibrous, lymphangiomatous masses commonly seen in this syndrome may involve the neck and face, leading to disfigurement and potential airway compromise.
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3/75. Cervico-mediastinal lymphangioma.

    Two cases of cervico-mediastinal lymphangioma ppesenting in adults are reported. In one the lesion originated in the mediastinum and only when advanced showed extension into the neck. The other was associated with a cervical cystic hygroma. Both wwer relieved by one-stage excision. Although they are benign, the tendency of these lesions is to become progressively larger, and to infiltrate between the vital structures in the neck and mediastinum. These features, and the importance of early surgery, are illustrated by the patients we now report.
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4/75. The ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure for a large fetal neck mass in a twin gestation.

    BACKGROUND: Large fetal neck masses can make it difficult or impossible to secure airways at birth, with associated risks of hypoxia, brain injury, and death. Based on a medline search from 1966 to June 1998, using the keywords EXIT procedure, placental support, twins, and neck mass, we report the first ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure performed in a twin gestation complicated by a large fetal neck mass. CASE: A giant fetal cervical mass was diagnosed in one fetus of a 20-week twin gestation by sonography and magnetic resonance imaging. At 35 weeks' gestation, the ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure was performed successfully for delivery of the normal twin, followed by intrapartum airway access of the twin with the neck mass. CONCLUSION: Even in twin gestations, the ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure is the delivery method of choice for fetuses with giant neck masses.
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5/75. Acute airway obstruction from a laryngeal lymphangioma in a child.

    Lymphangiomas present commonly in the head and neck region with over 90% of lesions diagnosed before 2 years of age. These lesions have rarely been reported as a cause of acute upper airway obstruction and to date, there are very few reports in the literature documenting the presence of lymphangiomas in the larynx. We present the case of a previously asymptomatic 13-year-old girl with Joubert's syndrome, who presented with acute airway obstruction while undergoing extubation for a routine dental procedure. Near-complete obstruction of her supraglottis from a lymphangioma necessitated tracheotomy to secure the airway. The diagnostic work-up and management of this patient and her post-operative course are discussed. This case illustrates the insidious presentation of a laryngeal lymphangioma and emphasizes the management options for such patients.
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6/75. lymphangioma of the kidney.

    Lymphangiomas are rare benign tumors that are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. Most cases present in children as a soft, cystic mass in the neck and the axilla. Primary renal lymphangioma is exceedingly rare, with only 35 cases reported so far. We report a case of primary lymphangioma arising from the kidney. A 59-year-old man was referred for evaluation of a right renal mass found in an abdominal ultrasonography during a health checkup. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed a 3.2 x 2.9 cm multiloculated cystic mass in the upper pole of the right kidney. We could not deny malignant disease such as cystic renal cell carcinoma with any diagnostic modalities. The patient was brought to surgery. During the surgical procedure, the tumor was suspected to be lymphangioma of the kidney as a result of a frozen- section histopathological evaluation. Therefore enucleation of the tumor was performed. Pathological evaluation of the specimen revealed lymphangioma arising from the kidney. The patient is free of disease after a 3-month follow-up period.
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7/75. lymphangioma of the sphenoid sinus.

    Lymphangiomas are rare benign lymphatic tumours found predominantly in the head and neck region. A case of a cavernous lymphangioma isolated to the sphenoid sinus is described. The authors emphasize the extreme rarity of the isolated sphenoid lymphangioma, as to their knowledge this is the first report in the English literature.
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8/75. Omental lymphangioma in an adult.

    Lymphangiomas are commonly found in the head and neck region. They are commonly seen in children while mesenteric cysts are more common in adults. We report the case of a 34-year-old man who was diagnosed as having a lymphangioma.
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9/75. Isolated laryngeal lymphangioma showing the symptoms of acute epiglottitis.

    Lymphangiomas are rare, congenital lesions of the lymphatic system, and about 90% of them are detected by the 2nd year of life. Although the head and neck region is the most common place of presentation, isolated laryngeal lymphangioma is extremely rare. A 37-year-old female patient presented with characteristic symptoms of acute epiglottitis. After her acute symptoms resolved with medical treatment, endoscopy was performed, and a wide, pedunculated mass arising from the epiglottis of the larynx was seen. The mass was totally excised and microscopically diagnosed as lymphangioma. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature. In the control examination performed after 9 months, no evidence of recurrence was revealed. This interesting case illustrates that the symptoms of acute epiglottitis in the adult should be further investigated to exclude rare lesions such as lymphangioma.
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10/75. Childhood airway manifestations of lymphangioma: a case report.

    lymphangioma is a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system, often involving areas of the head and neck. The involved structures may include enlarged tongue and lips, swelling of the floor of the mouth, and direct involvement of the upper respiratory tract. The definitive treatment for lymphangioma is surgery, often during the first years of life. Despite surgical removal, lymphangioma may persist. Anesthetic concerns include bleeding, difficulty visualizing the airway, extrinsic and intrinsic pressure on the airway causing distortion, and enlarged upper respiratory structures, including the lips, tongue, and epiglottis. This is a case report of a 9-year-old patient with lymphangioma who had impacted teeth and a suspected odontogenic cyst. There seems to be little information on the optimal anesthetic management for this age group. The challenges with airway management, including bleeding, laryngospasm, and a difficult intubation, are outlined. awareness of potential airway involvement and possible complications is necessary to provide a safe anesthetic to a patient with lymphangioma. A review of the literature, airway management techniques, and current airway equipment will be discussed.
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