Cases reported "Lymphangioma"

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1/27. lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue.

    A case is reported of severe transient macroglossia after biopsy from the tongue in a 13-year-old boy who has had intermittent macroglossia since the age of 1 year as a result of extensive lymphangioma circumscriptum of the tongue. The acute lesions appear to result from haemorrhage into the lymphatic spaces following rupture of blood vessels in connective tissue septa and possibly secondary infection.
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2/27. Lymphangiomatous macroglossia.

    Lymphangiomatous macroglossia, or giant tongue, usually presents within the first two years of life. The tongue enlarges to the point of protrusion from the mouth with resultant ulceration and frank necrosis of the tip. There may be associated malocclusion and prognathia produced by the enlargement of the tongue. The pathology and clinical manifestations of lymphangioma of the tongue are discussed in this paper, and a case report is presented.
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3/27. lymphangioma of the tongue presenting as ludwig's angina.

    In this paper we present a case of a 6-year-old child who presented with ludwig's angina caused by an infected tongue base lymphangioma. We provide a literature review of tongue lymphangioma and ludwig's angina in the paediatric population. Both ludwig's angina and tongue base lymphangioma are rare conditions in their own right and a combination of the two has not previously been described in the literature.
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4/27. Congenital macroglossal angiodysplasia ("Lymphangioendotheliomatosis").

    A case of congenital lingual angiodysplasia with macroglossia in a 5-year-old girl is presented. A diffusely enlarged tongue was present at birth and continued to grow as the child aged. It was accompanied by impaired speech, difficulty in eating and breathing, and sleep apnea, necessitating surgical intervention. The fundamental lesion represents a complex vascular malformation of the lymphangioma-hemangioma type, involving extensively the deep musculature of the tongue. Multifocal and multicentric cavernous lymphangioma-like and hemangioma-like areas merge with benign angioendotheliomatous-like foci in a background of variable muscle degeneration and marked fibrosis. Neither a borderline nor an overtly malignant vasoformative neoplasm was present. Because of its distinctively widespread, multicentric intramuscular distribution, this lesion may be construed as a diffuse variant of lingual lymphangioma-hemangioma malformation, closely resembling a previously described case of macroglossal lymphangioendotheliomatosis.
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5/27. macroglossia combined with lymphangioma: a case report.

    A four year old white female with a clinical presentation of macroglossia is described. speech disturbances and occasional episodes of traumatic injury to the tongue with severe bleeding brought the patient to seek dental care. lymphangioma was diagnosed after incisional biopsy. The differential diagnosis of tongue enlargement in children is discussed including review of the literature relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of lymphangioma.
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6/27. Huge lymphangioma of the tongue: a case report.

    lymphangioma of the tongue is relatively rare and may cause facial structural deformity. Using a combination of a V-shaped and central resection, we successfully treated a 6-year-old girl who had massive lymphangioma of the tongue. Postoperatively, her tongue was located completely within her mouth with good cosmetic results. Sensory and motor nerves to the tongue appeared to be intact. Her speech was also improved.
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7/27. Childhood airway manifestations of lymphangioma: a case report.

    lymphangioma is a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system, often involving areas of the head and neck. The involved structures may include enlarged tongue and lips, swelling of the floor of the mouth, and direct involvement of the upper respiratory tract. The definitive treatment for lymphangioma is surgery, often during the first years of life. Despite surgical removal, lymphangioma may persist. Anesthetic concerns include bleeding, difficulty visualizing the airway, extrinsic and intrinsic pressure on the airway causing distortion, and enlarged upper respiratory structures, including the lips, tongue, and epiglottis. This is a case report of a 9-year-old patient with lymphangioma who had impacted teeth and a suspected odontogenic cyst. There seems to be little information on the optimal anesthetic management for this age group. The challenges with airway management, including bleeding, laryngospasm, and a difficult intubation, are outlined. awareness of potential airway involvement and possible complications is necessary to provide a safe anesthetic to a patient with lymphangioma. A review of the literature, airway management techniques, and current airway equipment will be discussed.
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8/27. Decreased tongue mobility -- an explanation for difficult endotracheal intubation?

    Established parameters predictive of difficulty in airway management were inconclusive in five ear, nose and throat (ENT) patients. All presented with degrees of tongue fixation - restriction of movement. Initially, experienced anaesthetists concluded that conventional endotracheal intubation would present no problems. Later, there were adjustments to this conclusion, with the ultimate being that four of the patients underwent fibre-optic intubation: one electively, two after repeated failed conventional attempts and one after a failed attempt of retrograde intubation. The last patient underwent elective retrograde intubation. All intubations were performed uneventfully in anaesthetized or sedated patients under spontaneous respiration. We found that tongue fixation was a direct cause of failed conventional endotracheal intubation, and recommend that a detailed tongue status investigation should be routine during Mallampati evaluation. Any abnormality should be seen as predictive of difficult/impossible conventional direct laryngoscopic intubation.
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9/27. Treatment of hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation of the tongue with a pulsed-dye laser.

    Hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation (formerly called hemolymphangioma) of the tongue is an uncommon malformation that may pose both functional and cosmetic problems for the patient. The challenge has been to find a conservative treatment with low morbidity and better results than those achieved with surgical excision, which has been the mainstay of therapy. We report a case of successful treatment of a hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation of the tongue with a variable-pulse 595-nm pulsed-dye laser (Vbeam; Candela Corp, Wayland, Mass). In this patient, pulsed-dye laser treatment of the hemorrhagic lymphatic malformation achieved satisfactory functional and cosmetic outcomes. Its use in superficial vascular lesions of the mucosa should be considered.
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10/27. dental care management of a young patient with extensive lymphangioma of the tongue: a case report.

    Lymphangiomas are benign tumors resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. Relatively uncommon, lymphangiomas are usually diagnosed at birth and develop within the first years of life. When these tumors occur in the oral cavity, the tongue is the most frequently affected site. lymphangioma of the tongue is a common cause of macroglossia in children, which may lead to a dry/cracked tongue with ulcerating secondary infections, difficulty in swallowing and mastication, speech disturbances, exclusive nasal breathing, airway obstruction, mandibular prognathism and other possible deformities of maxillofacial structures. This paper discusses the most relevant features, clinical manifestations, disease-related impairments and treatment options for lymphangioma of the tongue. It presents the case report of a five-year-old child diagnosed with this lesion, including a description of the patient's dental care management.
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