Cases reported "Lymphangioma"

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11/27. lymphangioma of the tongue: response to intralesional steroids.

    A 10-year-old boy presented with lymphangioma involving the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. Excellent cosmetic and functional results were achieved with multiple intralesional steroid injections. Various treatment modalities advocated for lymphangioma of the tongue are discussed.
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12/27. The treatment of lymphangioma in the buccal mucosa by radiofrequency ablation: a case report.

    lymphangioma is a benign, hamartomatous tumor of the lymphatic system. It is usually found in the head and neck region and is widely regarded as a developmental lesion rather than a true neoplasia. Most lymphangiomas are present at birth (60%), and by the age of 2 years 80% to 90% are present. In the head and neck area, the most common location is the submandibular region, followed by the parotid gland. When lymphangioma occurs in the mouth, the anterior two thirds of the tongue is the most commonly affected region. Various methods have been tried for treatment of lymphangioma including surgery, radiation, laser therapy, and sclerotherapy. Recently, a new and more conservative surgical approach to this lesion using radiofrequency ablation has been described. In this report, a case of lymphangioma in the right buccal mucosa of the mental foramen area that has been treated by radiofrequency ablation is presented.
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13/27. lymphangioma of the tongue. A review of pathogenesis, treatment and the use of surface laser photocoagulation.

    Lymphangiomas of the tongue are rare tumours. Several reports of this interesting condition have appeared in the literature with varying modalities of treatment being employed to control tongue size. We present here our experience with seven children who have lymphangiomas of the head and neck with tongue involvement seen over the past eight years. If the tongue is large with protrusion outside the lip margins, we advocate early tongue reduction so as to promote proper speech and deglutition, reduce orthodontic problems and achieve good cosmesis. However, the natural history of these tumours is one of recurrent tongue enlargement secondary to infection and trauma, irrespective of surgical reduction. We describe our technique of surface CO2 laser photocoagulation which has been successfully employed in controlling tongue size and removing superficial lymphangioma in all our patients. We propose therefore that this should be the mainstay of follow-up therapy in lingual lymphangiomas.
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14/27. lymphangioma of the tongue and the team approach.

    Case report of a 9-year-old female with a 7cm (length) x 4cm (width) x 1cm (thick) lymphangioma of the tongue. The tumor caused speech distortion, crowding of the anterior maxillary and mandibular teeth, and a prognathic mandible. The patient was evaluated by the members of the cleft lip and palate Team at St. Christopher's Hospital and underwent a complete resection of the tumor and is continuing follow-up care. This case exemplifies the value in a team approach to a variety of intraoral problems.
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15/27. lymphangioma of the tongue: medical and surgical therapy.

    Therapy for lingual lymphangioma consists of the following: --medical therapy for acute swelling in the form of steroids, enzymes, and antibiotics; --surgery by horizontal, partial wedge resection of diffuse lesions, and total excision of small circumscribed lesions; --adjunctive therapy, which includes reduction of sharp incisal edges, early orthondontic therapy for open bite, and orthognathic surgery, if indicated.
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16/27. Lymphangiomas of the tongue.

    Lymphangiomas of the tongue are relatively uncommon developmental anomalies, which may present as either localised or diffuse lesions. Two cases are reported, and the literature reviewed.
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17/27. lymphangioma of the tongue: report of case.

    Lymphangiomas are benign tumors of the lymphatic vessels, usually found in children. Lymphangiomas, however, may be misdiagnosed and in the absence of treatment may increase in size, producing macroglossia, swallowing and speech interferences, and respiratory difficulty. The size and isolated location of the lesion in the midline of the tongue reported here are unusual; few similar cases have been reported in the literature. Complete surgical excision provided not only removal of the lesion, but allowed normal recontouring of the tongue.
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18/27. A case of cystic lymphangioma extending from the neck to the tongue. Management of the lesion remaining after surgery.

    A case of cystic lymphangioma in a child is reported. The lesion extended bilaterally from the neck to the tongue. Complete removal of the tumour in the floor of the mouth and the tongue was impossible. Later, swelling in these regions caused dyspnoea. The residual lesion was treated by external irradiation (60 Co total dose of 30 Gy). During a three-year follow-up period, no recurrence of the swelling, respiratory distress, or side-effects of radiation were observed.
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19/27. A case report of lingual lymphangioma presenting as recurrent massive tongue enlargement.

    Lymphangiomas are benign congenital tumors that frequently result in macroglossia. tongue involvement may lead to airway obstruction, swallowing difficulties, mandible-dental deformities, and speech disturbances. This case report demonstrates the many difficulties in diagnosis and management. Reduction in tongue size with preservation of motor and sensory function is best accomplished by wedge resection of the tip of the tongue.
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20/27. Management of giant cystic hygromas in infants.

    Giant cystic lymphangioma is a rare lesion that presents major therapeutic challenges. Four infants presented in the first weeks of life with diffuse cysts in the neck. The tongue was involved in three, the mediastinum in one, and the pharynx and supraglottic larynx in two. These lesions are characterized by hundreds of cysts that infiltrate in and around muscles, nerves, and vessels. Complete excision is not possible without damaging the normal structures. All four infants initially had partial removal with unroofing and drainage of the remaining cysts and temporary tracheostomy to protect the airway. One infant died from a thrombosed sagittal sinus. She had severe venous congestion of the head and neck postoperatively which may have been caused by an overzealous attempt to remove all of the cysts. The other three have required nine additional operations for removal of recurrent neck cysts (one operation), removal of mediastinal cysts (one operation), partial glossectomy (three operations), and laser excision of lymphangiomas of the pharynx and supraglottic larynx (four operations). Two patients have required partial glossectomy which should be performed early to protect the airway, to allow normal speech development, and to prevent malocclusion and prognathism from constant pressure of the tongue against the teeth. Removal of wedges of tissue from each side and from the center of the dorsum of the tongue reduces bulk with minimal risk to the lingual arteries and nerves. Recurrent tongue enlargement is common and can be treated by repeated partial glossectomy. Lymphangiomatosis of the pharynx and supraglottic larynx is difficult to treat. The carbon dioxide laser allows very precise excision of individual cysts with minimal drainage to adjacent mucosa, but in our limited experience it has not prevented recurrence. Despite the extensive nature of these lesions, the impossibility of complete excision, and the need for multiple operations, the long-term results in the three surviving patients have been satisfactory. Asymmetry of the neck and face due to lymphedema tends to improve with time. All three children have an acceptable appearance and normal speech for their ages.
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