Cases reported "Lymphatic Diseases"

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1/7. actinomyces and actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-actinomyces-associated lymphadenopathy mimicking lymphoma.

    We present 2 unusual cases of long-standing, extensive reactive lymphadenopathy secondary to actinomyces infection, 1 of which was also accompanied by actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-actinomyces complex infection. To our knowledge, histologic features of lymph node involvement by these organisms have not been previously reported in the literature. One patient had extensive cervical, posterior mediastinal, and abdominal lymphadenopathy. The second patient presented with a submandibular mass and cervical lymphadenopathy. Clinical features strongly suggested lymphoma. The histologic examination of the lymph nodes from both patients revealed reactive follicular hyperplasia, marked interfollicular and capsular fibrosis, and multiple interfollicular microabscesses. Characteristic actinomyces colonies were identified at the center of the microabscesses in deep sections. Cultures were obtained from the lymph nodes of 1 patient, and were positive for A actinomycetemcomitans. Both patients had poor dental hygiene. Lymphadenopathy subsided with antibiotic therapy and appropriate dental care.
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keywords = bacillus
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2/7. A case of primary tularemic pneumonia presenting with necrotizing mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes.

    tularemia is an unusual disease caused by the gram-negative coccobacillus francisella tularensis. The clinical features of the disease depend on the route of inoculation. Ulceroglandular and typhoidal forms have been recognized as occurring in tularemia, however primary or secondary pneumonic infections have also been reported. Symptoms, laboratory markers and radiological features are non-specific in tularemic pneumonia. diagnosis is made on clinical grounds and evidence of elevated agglutinating antibodies to F. tularensis (> 1:128). We report a case of primary tularemic pneumonia presenting with pulmonary infiltrates and necrotizing mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes in an otherwise healthy subject from a non-endemic area. diagnosis of tularemia was obtained serologically, and antibiotic therapy with doxycycline and streptomycin resolved symptoms and radiological abnormalities. We suggest that tularemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumonia with mediastinal and/or hilar lymphadenopathy.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bacillus
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3/7. Lymphadenopathy after BCG vaccination in a child with chronic granulomatous disease.

    We report a 15-month-old boy who developed an ulcer in the left axillary fold following bacillus Calmette-Guerin vaccination. Subsequent immunologic and genetic studies led to the diagnosis of chronic granulomatous disease. His mother had "lupus-like" lesions, described in some carriers of this disease, that were thus related to her son's diagnosis. Although in healthy subjects this vaccination is usually harmless, in instances of impaired immunity it may cause adverse reactions. When a vaccine-related complication occurs, an underlying immunodeficiency should be sought.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bacillus
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4/7. Infections with pseudomonas paucimobilis: report of four cases and review.

    pseudomonas paucimobilis (formerly CDC group IIK, biotype 1) is a strictly aerobic, nonfermenting, oxidase- and catalase-positive, gram-negative bacillus that is widely distributed in water and soil. Its name derives from the difficulty encountered in demonstrating its motility, even in liquid media. This microorganism is responsible for two types of infection in humans: sporadic or community-acquired infections, probably of endogenous or environmental origin (bacteremia, meningitis, urinary tract infection, and wound infection); and outbreaks of nosocomial infection associated with the contamination of sterile fluids employed in hospitals. We present four cases of infection caused by P. paucimobilis (two of bacteremia, one of leg ulcer infection, and one of cervical adenitis). The majority of infections produced by P. paucimobilis have a good prognosis; no deaths related to this entity have been reported in the literature. The published results of susceptibility tests suggest that the aminoglycosides (either alone or in combination with a beta-lactam antibiotic) or the quinolone may be the agents of choice in the treatment of these infections.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bacillus
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5/7. Histopathology of bacillary angiomatosis of lymph node.

    Bacillary angiomatosis, a recently characterized pseudoneoplastic vascular proliferation caused by a bacterium identical or related to the cat-scratch disease bacillus, usually presents as cutaneous lesions. We report the histologic findings of this disease involving the lymph nodes of two immunocompromised patients. The lymph nodes showed patchy involvement by coalescent nodules of proliferated blood vessels lined by plump endothelial cells with pale cytoplasm. There were foci exhibiting mild to moderate nuclear atypia. Although neutrophil infiltration was prominent in one case, it was minimal in the other. The interstitium was formed by pink-staining material in hematoxylin-eosin-stained sections, and this proved to be aggregated bacilli on Warthin-Starry stain. Recognition of this potentially fatal disease is important because it is curable with antibiotics.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bacillus
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6/7. periodic acid-Schiff-negative granulomatous lymphadenopathy in patients with Whipple's disease. Localization of the Whipple bacillus to noncaseating granulomas by electron microscopy.

    The diagnosis of Whipple's disease in a 58-year-old man was based on the finding of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive foamy macrophages on duodenal biopsy and demonstration of the typical bacilliform bodies by electron microscopy. The patient also had generalized peripheral lymphadenopathy with lymph node biopsy showing PAS-negative noncaseating granulomas. Electron microscopic examination of the lymph node specimen demonstrated a small number of typical bacilliform bodies with localization specifically to the granulomas in the lymph node. This finding of bacilliform bodies within PAS-negative noncaseating granulomas has not been reported previously. Localization of the Whipple bacillus specifically to noncaseating granulomas suggests that some patients with the disease may manifest a delayed hypersensitivity reaction to the bacillus.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = bacillus
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7/7. Granulomatous hepatitis associated with cat scratch disease.

    In three patients with cat scratch disease the liver was affected. All three had high fever (39 degrees C) for more than 3 weeks. Two of them had no peripheral adenopathy. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed focal hepatic defects in two patients and periportal and periaortic adenopathy in the third. At laparotomy, there were nodules on the liver surfaces of all patients and histological examination revealed necrotising granulomata. The Warthin-Starry silver stain showed organisms consistent in appearance with the cat scratch bacillus in the liver and a periaortic lymph node of one patient, in the liver of the second patient, and in the axillary lymph node of the third. In all three patients the clinical findings and radiological abnormalities improved without specific therapy. A review of the surgical pathology files of washington University revealed only two other cases of granulomatous hepatitis in children over a 6-year period. These findings indicate that cat scratch disease should now be included in the differential diagnosis of granulomatous hepatitis, at least in children. The absence of peripheral adenopathy in two of the three patients with granulomatous hepatitis suggests that the clinical spectrum of cat scratch disease may be broader than previously appreciated.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bacillus
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