Cases reported "Lymphatic Metastasis"

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1/11. Ovarian dysgerminoma with massive metastases to para-aortic lymph nodes.

    We report on a 15-year-old female with left ovarian dysgerminoma accompanied by massive swelling of the para-aortic lymph nodes which was clearly demonstrated by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Metastasis to the para-aortic lymph nodes from dysgerminoma was confirmed by biopsies obtained during surgery. No study has previously reported dysgerminoma with massive para-aortic lymph node metastases clearly demonstrated by MRI. These preoperative MRI findings are presented here. The patient received six cycles of cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy with the BEP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin) after conservative surgery, and no residual para-aortic lymph nodes were detected by MRI or CT after the chemotherapy.
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2/11. genome profiles of bilateral dysgerminomas, a unilateral gonadoblastoma, and a metastasis from a 46, XY phenotypic female.

    We present a case report of a 16-year-old, phenotypic female with bilateral dysgerminomas, a unilateral gonadoblastoma, and a peritoneal metastasis. The patient's constitutional karyotype was 46,XY. The chromosomal copy number, examined by the comparative genomic hybridization technique, showed 3 gains in the dysgerminoma of the right ovary, 6 gains in the dysgerminoma of the left ovary, and 2 gains and 1 loss in the gonadoblastoma of the left ovary. The metastasis showed 5 gains of which 4 were also observed in the dysgerminoma of the left ovary. The dna ploidy classifications of the gonadoblastoma and the dysgerminoma in the right ovary were tetraploid, whereas the dysgerminoma in the left ovary and the metastasis were aneuploid. We therefore propose that the metastasis most probably developed from the dysgerminoma of the left ovary.
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ranking = 1.5714285714286
keywords = dysgerminoma
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3/11. Pure XY gonadal dysgenesis presenting as secondary amenorrhea. A case report.

    Secondary amenorrhea developed after two years of normal menstruation. On investigation, the patient's karyotype was 46,XY, the serum testosterone and free androgen index were elevated, and bilateral gonadoblastomas and dysgerminomas were found in the gonads. The uterus, fallopian tubes and vagina were normal. The gonads were removed and chemotherapy given because of lymphadenopathy.
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keywords = dysgerminoma
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4/11. Ovarian dysgerminoma metastatic to the breast.

    A 16-year-old girl underwent a right salpingo-oophorectomy for a pure dysgerminoma limited to the right ovary. One month later, she developed a right pelvic mass along with abdominal lymphadenopathies, peritoneal carcinomatosis, left breast mass, and left axillary node. Cytology of the breast mass was suggestive of a pure dysgerminoma. breast metastases of epithelial ovarian carcinoma are uncommon. In the literature, this is the first case of a breast metastasis of an ovarian dysgerminoma.
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5/11. Chemotherapeutic complete remission in patients with metastatic ovarian dysgerminoma. Potential for cure and preservation of reproductive capacity.

    Two patients with metastatic dysgerminoma of the ovary were treated with a combination of etoposide, bleomycin, and cisplatin at The University of texas M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston. Both patients achieved a complete remission. Patient 1 developed a massive recurrence in the para-aortic lymph nodes 21 months after diagnosis and treatment with right salpingo-oophorectomy alone. She received four cycles of chemotherapy and is free of disease 21 months from the start of chemotherapy. Patient 2 had Stage III dysgerminoma and a lymphangiogram positive for tumor in the para-aortic lymph nodes. After surgery she received three cycles of chemotherapy and is free of disease 20 months from the start of chemotherapy. Both complete remissions were documented with second-look laparotomy. Chemotherapy may be an alternative to radiotherapy for the treatment of metastatic dysgerminoma and should also be considered for selected patients with Stage I disease. A literature review further supports the conclusion that additional clinical trials might expand the indications for chemotherapy in patients with this disease.
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6/11. Mixed germ cell tumor of the ovary with pure choriocarcinoma metastasis.

    A case report of a 30-month disease-free survival in a ten-year-old girl with ovarian mixed germ cell tumor consisting of dysgerminoma, choriocarcinoma, and immature teratoma with pure choriocarcinoma paraaortic lymph node metastasis is presented. To prevent resistant cell colonies, the noncross-resistant combination of vinblastine-Adriamycin and vinblastine-actinomycin D-cytoxan were added to the initial four courses of vinblastine-cisplatin-bleomycin. There are no previously reported survivals in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors with pure choriocarcinoma metastasis.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = dysgerminoma
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7/11. Recurrent dysgerminoma after 33 years.

    Surgery with or without radiotherapy produces a high cure rate in localized pure dysgerminoma of the ovary. recurrence rates are low, and usually occur within 2 years. We report the case of a 58-year-old para 1 who developed recurrent pure dysgerminoma 33 years after initial surgery. The need for long-term follow-up of these patients is emphasized.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = dysgerminoma
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8/11. The deduction of tumor histogenesis, with special reference to teratomas and ovarian tumors.

    The secure deduction of tumor histogenesis in vivo is notoriously difficult, owing to the retrospective form of the inquiry, which implies that no histogenetic theory makes certain-enough predictions. Deduction of a tumor's parent tissue currently relies on 1) its location relative to that of small early tumors, 2) correlation of its relative availability with tumor frequency, 3) its resemblance to the tumor tissue in various respects, and 4) its microscopic continuity with the tumor through transitional forms. Each of these criteria has pitfalls, owing to possible failure of the relevant factor to persist or to subsequent mimicry of it by other processes. This makes reliance on only one or two criteria undesirable. The application of these criteria to teratomas shows that there are no convincing data provided by the fourth. A dysgerminoma containing multiple small teratoid foci, which was studied in detail, is described, and the origin of the second tissue from the first is argued. The apparently somatic origin of some of the mesenchyma and the role of the mesenchyma in promoting teratoma development and segregation are discussed.
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = dysgerminoma
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9/11. Anaplastic dysgerminoma.

    A rare case of rapidly evolving dysgerminoma produced death by tumor in less than two months after onset of symptoms. It is important to recall that dysgerminoma possesses considerable malignant potential, which infrequently is manifested by rapidly progressive disease. Certain risk factors, present in the pathological specimen, serve to indicate the aggressive potential of such neoplasms.
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ranking = 0.85714285714286
keywords = dysgerminoma
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10/11. Clinical, pathologic, and genetic findings in a case of 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer's syndrome).

    Cytogenetic, pathologic, and clinical studies were conducted on a phenotypically female patient with primary amenorrhea and infertility. Analysis of blood cultures with routine and Giemsa-banded preparations indicated that the chromosomal complement of the patient was 46,XY. Buccal and peripheral blood smears prepared for fluorescent analyses confirmed the presence of a single F-body (y chromosome). Pathologic examination of tissues removed at total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy revealed a gonadoblastoma of the right gonad, dysgerminoma of the left gonad, and an infantile hypoplastic uterus. The data were consistent with a diagnosis of 46,XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (Swyer's syndrome).
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ranking = 0.14285714285714
keywords = dysgerminoma
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