Cases reported "Lymphedema"

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1/41. The yellow nail syndrome, bronchiectasis and Raynaud's disease--a relationship.

    A case of the yellow nail syndrome with associated bronchiectasis, arterial insufficiency and Raynaud's disease is presented. A brief review of some of the literature on the yellow nail syndrome is made. A relationship between these problems is postulated.
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keywords = yellow
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2/41. Upper respiratory problems in the yellow nail syndrome.

    A case of the yellow nail syndrome is described. The characteristic nail changes were associated with pleural effusions, lymphoedema of the face and legs and upper respiratory symptoms. The finding of extremely hard ear wax has not been reported previously. A satisfactory response to combination diuretic therapy was seen. The case of recognition of the Syndrome is emphasized together with the danger of excessive investigation if the nails are not inspected. Possible mechanisms for the formation of extremely hard cerumen are discussed.
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keywords = yellow
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3/41. yellow nail syndrome presenting as non-immune hydrops: second case report.

    The yellow nail syndrome is characterized by slowly growing yellow discolored nails and lymphoedema, with onset generally after puberty. We report on a newborn infant who, at 23 weeks, was found to have hydrops on antenatal ultrasonography and bilateral chylothorax at delivery. His mother has the yellow nail syndrome, with typical nail changes, and bronchiectasis. There seemed to be no other etiology for the non-immune hydrops, and this is the second documented case of the prenatal manifestation of this condition.
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keywords = yellow
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4/41. yellow nail syndrome in a 10-year-old girl.

    A 10-year-old girl with yellow dystrophic nails, bronchiectasis, chronic sinusitis and lower-limb lymphedema is presented. The underlying mechanism remains unknown although it has been postulated to be associated with lymphatic abnormalities. To date no causative treatment exists. Our patient was treated with conservative management, including a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides. Moderate improvement in the lymphedema of the lower extremities was observed. To our knowledge this is the first case of yellow nail syndrome to be treated with diet.
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5/41. yellow nail syndrome: does protein leakage play a role?

    yellow nail syndrome is characterized by primary lymphoedema, recurrent pleural effusion and yellow discoloration of the nails. Although mechanical lymphatic obstruction is assumed to be the underlying pathology, it cannot explain the common finding of high albumin concentration in the pleural space. This paper describes a case of yellow nail syndrome presenting with the classical triad of lymphoedema, recurrent pleural effusion and yellow discoloration of the nails, associated with persistent hypoalbuminaemia and increased enteric loss of albumin. Based on the findings in this case and those in the literature, it is speculated that increased microvascular permeability may contribute to the pathogenesis of this syndrome.
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keywords = yellow
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6/41. yellow nail syndrome or diffuse lymphatic network disease.

    We report a man aged 68 years old with pneumothorax and chronic bilateral pleural effusion in association with a history of yellow nails. The diagnosis of yellow nail syndrome based on yellow nails, lymphedema, chronic pleural effusion and intestinal lymphangiectasia.
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keywords = yellow
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7/41. Yellow-nail syndrome: report of three cases.

    The yellow nail syndrome, a combination of yellow discolouration of and dystrophic changes in the nails, pleural effusions and lymphedema, is thought to be relatively rare; to date 44 cases have been reported. Of a further three patients with this syndrome, one had all three features, one had the yellow nails alone and the other had pleural effusions and lymphedema without classic nail changes. Each had recurrent lower respiratory tract infections; and of all 47, chronic pulmonary infections occurred in approximately one quarter and were frequently associated with chronic sinus infections. The underlying abnormality is presumed to be a congenital defect of the lymphatics, but so far this has not been demonstrated to be the cause of the nail changes, the pathogenesis of which remains obscure.
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8/41. Implantation of a pleurovenous shunt for massive chylothorax in a patient with yellow nail syndrome.

    yellow nail syndrome is a type of lymphatic dysplasia syndrome characterised by the triad of yellow nails, lymphoedema, and pleural effusions. The case history is presented of a 70 year old patient with yellow nail syndrome who complained of dyspnoea caused by massive chylothorax. The patient underwent insertion of a pleuroperitoneal shunt which resulted in abdominal distension and deterioration of leg oedema. The pleuroperitoneal shunt was replaced by a pleurovenous shunt on the right side which led to an improvement in the bilateral pleural effusions, abdominal distension, and leg oedema. A pleurovenous shunt may be an alternative rescue therapy for yellow nail syndrome.
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keywords = yellow
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9/41. Perinatal manifestations of maternal yellow nail syndrome.

    A term female firstborn infant had unexplained nonimmune fetal hydrops and recurrent left chylothorax at 4 weeks of age. A few months before conception, her mother had had acute dystrophic nail changes and is being treated for recurrent sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and a deficiency of serum IgG2. We suggest that they both suffer from a dominantly inherited congenital lymphedema syndrome known as 'yellow nail dystrophy.' Prenatal manifestation of this disorder has not been reported previously. The child's anthropometric and neurological development was normal at 1 year of age, whereas mild ankle edema and marbling of the skin of the limbs were salient clinical findings. Inherited lymphedema leading to nonimmune fetal hydrops also has been recognized in chromosomal disorders, Noonan's syndrome, multiple pterygium syndrome, pulmonary lymphangiectasis, and mixed-vessel lymphatic dysfunction. Indicators of parental lymphedema are not on record in those instances.
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keywords = yellow
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10/41. Familial yellow nail syndrome.

    A 70-year-old woman with yellow nail syndrome and right-sided pleural effusion, lower extremity edema, and hypoalbuminemia was followed for 18 months. She reported an 8-year history of asthma. She had four children (3 boys and 1 girl). Dystrophy, changes in color and shape of nails both hands and foot, along with lower extremity edema was observed in the daughter and two of her sons. One son had asthma. The patient reported that her grandmother had similar nail abnormality and lower extremity edema. Other family members and patient's grandchildren were healthy. This report demonstrates a case of familial yellow-nail syndrome.
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