Cases reported "Lymphedema"

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11/41. yellow nail syndrome: a rarity in Indians?

    Reports of yellow nail syndrome have been few and far between. The classical triad of the syndrome has not been reported in Indian literature. We report a case of yellow nail syndrome in a forty-year-old male, who had yellowish-brown nails from birth. He developed lymphoedema of the legs at the age of twenty years and presented with pleural effusion at the age of forty years. Although a case of yellow nail syndrome has been reported from india, the classical triad of the syndrome is yet to be documented from our country. The condition may be missed because of the long time difference in presentation of different components of the syndrome and also because of the dark skin colour of Indians.
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keywords = yellow
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12/41. Detection of bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography in the yellow nail syndrome.

    High resolution computed tomography of the lungs was performed in three patients with the yellow nail syndrome to detect bronchiectasis. Standard CT was performed in a fourth patient. Evidence of bronchiectasis with bronchial wall thickening and bronchial dilatation was observed in all four patients. High resolution CT is a non-invasive method for detecting and assessing the extent of airway disease in the yellow nail syndrome.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = yellow
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13/41. Ciliary motility in two patients with yellow nail syndrome and recurrent sinopulmonary infections.

    The yellow nail syndrome (YNS) is described as a combination of yellow nails, chronic lymphedema, pleural effusions, and recurrent sinopulmonary infections, but all these features need not be present for the diagnosis. The mechanism that renders patients with this syndrome susceptible to respiratory infections is not known. To determine whether abnormal ciliary motility is a predisposing factor, in vitro ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured in two patients with YNS and recurrent respiratory infections. In each case, the CBF was within normal limits (12 Hz). These data suggest that abnormal ciliary motility is not a pathophysiologic mechanism of recurrent sinopulmonary infections in YNS.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = yellow
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14/41. ear involvement in the yellow nail syndrome.

    Recognized features of the yellow nail syndrome include yellow nails, lymphedema, and pleural effusions. We report a patient with the additional feature of keratosis obturans, which may be a manifestation of this syndrome in the external ear.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = yellow
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15/41. Yellow nails, lymphedema and pleural effusion. Treatment of chronic pleural effusion with pleuroperitoneal shunting.

    pleural effusion secondary to lymphedema may be chronic, symptomatic and refractory to treatment, occasionally requiring invasive and painful procedures such as chemical pleurodesis, open pleural abrasion or pleurectomy to achieve control of the effusion and gain symptomatic relief. We report a patient with yellow nail syndrome and chronic pleural effusion successfully treated with pleuroperitoneal shunting.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = yellow
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16/41. yellow nail syndrome.

    The yellow nail syndrome is characterized by yellow, slow-growing nails in association with lymphedema, idiopathic pleural effusions, chronic bronchiectasis, and chronic sinusitis. We report two patients with yellow nail syndrome in whom spontaneous clearing of the nail changes occurred without resolution of the respiratory involvement. This observation suggests that nail changes may not result from the systemic manifestations. We also report for the first time the histopathologic findings of the nail matrix and bed, which demonstrate dense, fibrous tissue replacing subungual stroma with numerous ectatic, endothelium-lined vessels that are similar to that in the pleura in yellow nail syndrome. We hypothesize that primary stromal sclerosis may lead to lymphatic obstruction, thus explaining the clinical manifestations.
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ranking = 1
keywords = yellow
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17/41. Dietary treatment of chylous ascites in yellow nail syndrome.

    chylous ascites has rarely been reported in yellow nail syndrome. A case of chylous ascites in yellow nail syndrome is described which was treated successfully with dietary restriction of fat and supplements of medium chained triglycerides.
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ranking = 1.5
keywords = yellow
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18/41. yellow nail syndrome.

    The case of a patient with yellow nail syndrome (YNS), an infiltrating duct carcinoma of the breast, and giant cell interstitial pneumonitis (GIP) is presented. YNS has not been previously described in association with GIP. There was improvement of the yellow fingernails following surgery and chemotherapy for the breast cancer. The possible pathogenesis of the yellow nails in this case and its management are presented. A wide variety of conditions are associated with YNS, which has been reported to respond to various treatment modalities. The most likely cause in our case is impaired lymphatic drainage. However, treatments that do not affect lymphatic drainage also have been reported to be successful.
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ranking = 0.75
keywords = yellow
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19/41. Acquired pachydermatoglyphy. A cutaneous sign of internal malignancy.

    A 70-year-old man with hypertrophic osteoartropathy secondary to a squamous cell carcinoma of the lung presented a distinctive pattern of late-onset bilateral palmar keratoderma. A yellowish rugose appearance with accentuation of normal ridges and sulci (pachydermatoglyphy) involving the palms was observed. The differential diagnosis and the clinical relevance of acquired pachydermatoglyphy as a cutaneous marker of internal malignancy are discussed.
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ranking = 0.25
keywords = yellow
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20/41. yellow nail syndrome associated with chronic pericardial effusion.

    A 74-year-old man had typical yellow nail syndrome, associated with pericardial effusion and hyperimmunoglobulinemia (IgG 3,179 mg/dl, IgM 402 mg/dl). A search of the literature fails to reveal a previously reported case of yellow nail syndrome associated with pericardial effusion.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = yellow
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