Cases reported "Lymphocele"

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1/32. thigh isosulfan blue injection in the treatment of postoperative lymphatic complications.

    Postoperative lymphatic complications after infrainguinal revascularization are troublesome and potentially serious complications. Vital dye injection into the web spaces of the foot has been recommended as a simple and reliable method to identify lymphatic channel disruption before groin exploration. Such distal injections, however, are not always successful. We describe a modified technique using a proximal thigh injection with isosulfan blue, which is faster and more useful than the distal web space method.
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2/32. Lymphatic cyst of the colon: a case report.

    A rare case of a lymphatic cyst of the ascending colon is reported. The lobulated and fluctuant lesion, located in the hepatic flexure, was diagnosed by barium enema and colonoscopy, incidentally. Surgical treatment with segmental resection of the ascending colon was done because of the risk of obstruction and the question of an underlying malignancy. The clinical features, appropriate treatment, preoperative diagnosis and histopathology are discussed. We emphasize that lymphatic cysts are very rare and are difficult to identify by radiology or colonoscopy before surgery. They must be included in the differential diagnosis of submucosal tumors such as lipomas, leiomyomas and hemangiomas.
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3/32. Treatment of a retroperitoneal lymphocele after lumbar fusion surgery with intralesional povidone iodine: technical case report.

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: This case report illustrates an uncommon complication from the retroperitoneal exposure of the lumbar spine. The diagnosis and management of a retroperitoneal lymphocele is presented. The lymphocele was treated with intralesional povidone iodine (Betadine; Purdue-Frederick, Norwalk, CT), which eradicated the lesion and provided symptomatic relief to the patient. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A young woman developed an iatrogenic, rapidly progressive spondylolisthesis after having undergone three previous lumbar surgeries for radiculopathy at the L5-S1 level. INTERVENTION: A back-front-back approach was used for operative reduction and fusion of the spondylolisthesis. The patient's postoperative course was complicated by a retroperitoneal lymphocele. She presented with symptoms of urinary urgency and incontinence. The lymphocele was successfully treated with repeated drainage and sclerosis with povidone iodine. The patient ultimately developed a solid fusion, and her pain resolved. CONCLUSION: A retroperitoneal lymphocele is an uncommon complication caused by the surgical exposure of the lumbar spine when a ventral approach is used. In this case, it was diagnosed and treated without further surgical intervention.
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4/32. Laparoscopic surgery after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    Laparoscopic surgery is currently a widely accepted approach to several surgical fields because of its advantages in terms of postoperative pain reduction and easy patient recovery. This approach may be useful even in solid-organ transplantation surgery as a diagnostic or treatment procedure in some surgical complications. From July 1991 to December 1998, we performed 142 liver transplantations on 129 patients. During the postoperative period, many complications occurred. Here we report two cases of intestinal occlusion caused by adhesions and three cases of lymphocele, all approached with laparoscopic surgery. In all cases but one, we were able to complete the surgery by laparoscopic means; in one of the two occlusions, the procedure was switched to laparotomy because of a choledochojejunal anastomosis lesion. The three cases of lymphocele must be considered in a particular manner because such cases, to our knowledge, have never been described in the literature. They always presented with a late-onset right pleural effusion and were located in the retrohepatic, retrogastric, and left paracaval areas, close to the esophageal hiatus. In conclusion, we believe a laparoscopic approach is a useful strategy to solve some surgical complications in patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation; however, the use of laparoscopic surgery in this field is strictly connected to the surgeon's experience and versatility.
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5/32. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas with sebaceous differentiation.

    We recently encountered a patient with a lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas with sebaceous differentiation. We sought to compare the characteristics of this patient with those previously reported in order to foster a keener understanding of this rare clinical entity. After reviewing the present patient's case in detail, we conducted a comprehensive review of the English-language literature and analyzed the clinical characteristics of reported cases of lymphoepithelial cysts. Our patient was an asymptomatic 60-year-old man who presented with an incidental finding of a cystic lesion in the tail of the pancreas documented by computed tomography. The cyst was enucleated, and was found to contain keratinized material. It was lined by squamous epithelium with small sebaceous glands, and surrounded by lymphoid tissue with germinal centers. Of 33 reported cases, only 6 (18%) contained sebaceous glands. In all patients who underwent operation, the cysts were easily resected, and the outcome was favorable. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas is rare, and may be difficult to differentiate from cystic neoplasms preoperatively. Therefore resection is indicated. The diagnosis, however, can be confirmed by careful histologic review, and the prognosis is excellent.
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6/32. Transperitoneal guide-wire or drainage catheter placement for guidance of laparoscopic marsupialization of lymphocoeles post renal transplantation.

    BACKGROUND: Lymphocoeles post renal transplantation can be difficult to see laparoscopically. The objective of this study was to report a new technique of catheter or guide-wire placement for the guidance of laparoscopic marsupialization of symptomatic post renal transplant lymphocoeles, refractory to conservative therapy. methods: Conventional aseptic technique under local anaesthesia was used for guide-wire or catheter insertion, with the difference being the use of a transperitoneal approach. Computerized tomography (CT) or ultrasound (US) guidance was used. All lesions were confirmed to be sterile lymphocoeles beforehand by either needle aspiration or previous catheter drainage. RESULTS: Four catheters and one guide-wire were placed pre-operatively without complication. All cases underwent satisfactory laparoscopic marsupialization. No immediate complications were noted in any patient. The drainage catheters were inserted between 5 and 19 days before laparoscopic marsupialization, and guide-wire inserted immediately before. All patients proceeded to laparoscopic marsupialization. CONCLUSIONS: This technique offers precise guidance on laparoscopic surgery, is relatively simple to perform and no complications were experienced in this study. Its use is limited to sterile and benign lesions due to the risks of peritoneal seeding, making recurrent post-operative lymphocoeles ideally suited for this application.
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7/32. Minilaparotomy for internal drainage of a symptomatic lymphocele after renal transplantation.

    Development of a lymphocele after renal transplantation is a well-described complication that occurs with relative frequency. Management options include simple aspiration with sclerotherapy and operative marsupialization of the lymphoceles into the peritoneal cavity. Laparoscopic internal drainage has been favored in recent reports. Still, the laparoscopic procedure is associated with a number of potential problems, including difficulty in localizing lymphoceles if laparoscopic ultrasound is unavailable. In addition, lobulated lymphoceles are more difficult to completely dissect with laparoscopy, and lymphoceles always occur on the anterior and medial aspects of the graft which are easily approached directly from the anterior skin. We tried to resolve these complications by modifying traditional laparotomy and proved that laparoscopy is a progressive, popular procedure, and that fenestration with finger dissection of the lobulated lymphoceles through minilaparotomy is still a reliable, effective procedure.
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8/32. Treatment of recurrent inguinal lymphocele by lymphatic leakage mapping and subsequent ligation of lymphatic vessel endings: a case report.

    BACKGROUND: Different approaches have been attempted in both prophylaxis and treatment of recurrent inguinal lymphoceles; however, to date none have been consistently effective. We hereby report our preliminary experience with mapping of the lymphatic leakage followed by ligation of these mapped vessels for resolution of a recurrent inguinal lymphocele. CASE: A 73-year-old woman underwent an anterior modified radical vulvectomy with bilateral inguinofemoral lymph node dissection due to squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva. Postoperatively she presented with a recurrent inguinal lymphocele unresponsive to several treatment measures. After 8 weeks, the patient underwent lymphatic leakage mapping and subsequent ligation of lymphatic vessel endings, which resolved her recurrent lymphocele. CONCLUSION: Lymphatic mapping and ligation of afferent lymphatics may be a useful method for treating recurrent lymphoceles after inguinofemoral lymph node dissection. Further studies are warranted to prove the absolute efficacy of this technique.
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9/32. Lymphogenous cyst-vein shunt in the management of chylothorax and chylorrhea.

    A 36 year-old woman developed marked lymphedema and chylous cysts of the lower abdominal wall, groin, labia, accompanied by chylorrhea. After cyst excision and transplantation of the greater omentum, a left chylothorax occurred. After thoracic duct ligation and left pleurodesis, pleural effusion recurred and worsened. Lymphangioscintigraphy and conventional lymphography suggested that undrained enlarged retroperitoneal lymphatics in the right iliac fossa had disrupted and lymph had leaked into the left chest from the right iliac fossa. Treatment by a lymphatic cyst-vein anastomosis redirected excess chylous lymph into the blood circulation and chylothorax initially remitted. Several years later with recurrence of chylorrhea, the anastomosis was found to be occluded. After a second operative connection between a lymphogenous cyst and the greater saphenous vein, chylorrhea subsided and chylothorax has remitted for more than 4 years.
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10/32. Intraoperative lymphatic mapping to treat groin lymphorrhea complicating an elective medial thigh lift.

    groin lymphoceles and lymphorrhea are a rare complication of medial thigh lift procedures. The author describes a case in which a very thin patient developed groin lymphorrhea after an uncomplicated medial thigh lift procedure. Initial treatment interventions, including edema control and the placement of a drain with surgical exploration, failed to control the lymphatic leak. Additionally, the onset of an infection and abscess formation complicated the treatment efforts. Using techniques well established in treating cutaneous malignancies, the lymphocele was treated successfully by identifying three separately damaged lymphatic channels with the use of intraoperative lymphatic mapping with blue dye. No drains were needed and the immediate cessation of lymph flow was noted. Using this novel adaptation of a well-known technique, the groin lymphocele was able to be repaired quickly and effectively with minimal morbidity and no evidence of recurrence to date.
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