Cases reported "Lymphocytosis"

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1/15. Lymphocytic hypophysitis presenting with diabetes insipidus: MR findings.

    It has been thought that neurohypophysial involvement manifesting as central diabetes insipidus in lymphocytic hypophysitis is rare. The radiological and clinicopathological features of two cases represent a variant of lymphocytic adenohypophysitis and/or lymphocytic infundibulo-neurohypophysitis are discussed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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2/15. Unusual MRI findings in lymphocytic hypophysitis with central diabetes insipidus.

    We report an unusual case of lymphocytic hypophysitis, which proved to be cystic at surgery.
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ranking = 0.8
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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3/15. Cystic lymphocytic hypophysitis, visual field defects and hypopituitarism.

    A 45-year-old man presented with anterior pituitary failure, requiring thyroxine, hydrocortisone and androgen replacement. An MRI scan revealed a large cystic pituitary mass and thickening of the pituitary stalk. Over three years, diabetes insipidus and bitemporal hemianopia developed and the cystic mass had enlarged on MR scanning. Transphenoidal resection was performed with normalisation of the visual fields. histology revealed lymphocytic hypophysitis, which is rare in men. The presentation with cystic enlargement is unique.
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ranking = 0.040767041042765
keywords = insipidus, diabetes
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4/15. Lymphocytic hypophysitis with diabetes insipidus: improvement by methylprednisolone pulse therapy.

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis is a rare inflammatory disorder in the pituitary gland. The lesion is usually confined to the adenohypophysis. Although the involvement of the posterior pituitary gland or the stalk is rare, such patients with diabetes insipidus have been reported. Surgery has been used to make the definitive diagnosis. Recent studies suggest, however, that the pathologic diagnosis may not be necessary always. We reported a case of Lymphocytic hypophysitis managed by methylprednisolone pulse therapy. A 50-year-old premenopausal woman with Lymphocytic hypophysitis and diabetes insipidus was treated with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Her adenopituitary lesion disappeared and the diabetes insipidus resolved. The optimal management for patients with lymphocytic hypophysitis may be the high index of the suspicion prior to the extensive surgical resection. In addition, methylprednisolone pulse therapy may improve the clinical and MRI findings.
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ranking = 1.4
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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5/15. A case of lymphocytic hypophysitis with masked diabetes insipidus unveiled by glucocorticoid replacement.

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis may involve the pituitary gland and various hormonal abnormalities. A 72-year-old man presented with euvolemic hyponatremia caused by glucocorticoid deficiency. After glucocorticoid replacement, hypernatremia in the presence of dilute urine was found. Central diabetes insipidus (DI) was confirmed later by a significant increase in urine osmolality after vasopressin administration. brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a pituitary mass and loss of hyperintense signal in the posterior pituitary gland on T1-weighted imaging. The patient underwent a transsphenoidal adenectomy, and pathological examination of dissected tissues showed a typical finding of lymphocytic hypophysitis. Two months after surgery, the patient's central DI had resolved sufficiently that 1-desamino-8- d -arginine vasopressin therapy was discontinued without polyuria. However, he was kept on glucocorticoid and levothyroxine therapy. In conclusion, lymphocytic hypophysitis may feature a concealed central DI caused by glucocorticoid deficiency-associated hyponatremia.
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ranking = 1
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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6/15. Lymphocytic adenohypophysitis accompanying occlusion of bilateral internal carotid arteries--case report.

    A 45-year-old female presented with blurred vision, headache, and abnormal thirstiness. She was not pregnant nor postpartum. She had diabetes insipidus and bitemporal hemianopsia. Radiological evidence suggested a mass arising in the sella turcica with extension into the parasellar and suprasellar regions. Carotid angiography showed occlusions of bilateral internal carotid arteries at the cavernous portions. The mass was subtotally removed by the trans-sphenoidal approach and was histologically diagnosed as an adenohypophysitis. Laboratory data showed the patient to be in an active state of autoimmune disorder and hypopituitarism. When a patient presents with pituitary insufficiency and an enhanced intrasellar mass lesion on computed tomographic scan, lymphocytic adenohypophysitis must be included in the differential diagnosis.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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7/15. Diabetic (lymphocytic) mastopathy with exuberant lymphohistiocytic and granulomatous response: a case report with review of the literature.

    We report a case of a 66-year-old woman who presented with multiple painless masses in both breasts. Prior bilateral biopsies were diagnosed as Rosai-Dorfman disease (Sinus histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy). A recent lumpectomy specimen revealed a gray-white smooth cut surface with a discrete masslike lesion. The histopathology demonstrated a fibrotic breast parenchyma with foci of dense fibrosis and scattered inconspicuous breast epithelium surrounded by lymphocytes that formed aggregates and follicles with germinal centers. The inflammation was in a periductal, perilobular, and perivascular distribution. In addition, an exuberant inflammatory response with histiocytes and fibroblasts was present. This inflammatory response focally surrounded areas of fat necrosis and formed noncaseating granulomas with rare multinucleated giant cells. This process had infiltrative, ill-defined edges and involved the subcutaneous tissues. The overlying epidermis was normal. The final diagnosis was diabetic mastopathy with an exuberant lymphohistiocytic response. The differential diagnosis included Rosai-Dorfman disease, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, granulomatous mastitis, sclerosing lipogranulomatous response/sclerosing lipogranuloma, lupus panniculitis, and rheumatoid nodules. Immunohistochemical studies and flow cytometry confirmed the polyclonal nature of the lymphoid infiltrate. After the histologic evaluation, we inquired if the patient had a history of diabetes mellitus, and learned that she did have type 2 noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, we report a case of diabetic mastopathy that presents with bilateral tumorlike masses and an unusual exuberant lymphohistiocytic response with granuloma formation. The pathologist may not be provided with a history of diabetes mellitus, but the characteristic fibrosis, lymphocytic ductitis/lobulitis, and sclerosing lobulitis with perilobular and perivascular lymphocytic infiltrates should provide clues for an accurate diagnosis, even when an exuberant and an unusual lymphohistiocytic response is present. A timely accurate diagnosis can help limit repeat surgeries in this vulnerable group of patients.
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ranking = 0.004185648597454
keywords = diabetes
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8/15. viremia with herpes simplex type 1 in adults. Four nonfatal cases, one with features of chicken pox.

    Recovery of herpes simplex virus (HSV) Type 1 from the blood buffy coat of four adults is reported for the first time. All of the patients had vesicular stomatitis and facial vesicles; two also had either keratoconjunctivitis or disseminated skin lesions. The infection was not the primary one with HSV in any of them. Two of three patients who had renal failure were receiving immunosuppressive drugs; one patient was normal except for alcoholism and diabetes. None developed signs of visceral organ infection and all recovered within 2 to 4 weeks. The findings demonstrate the occurrence of heretofore unrecognized nonfatal HSV Type 1 viremia in both healthy and immunosuppressed leukocytes, can occur regardless of the presence of serum antibody, and may or may not be associated with the disseminated lesions.
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ranking = 0.0013952161991513
keywords = diabetes
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9/15. hypopituitarism associated with transient diabetes insipidus followed by an episode of painless thyroiditis in a young man.

    A 16-year-old male complained of a headache and a high fever followed by polyuria. The endocrinological studies showed he had hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a pituitary mass. diabetes insipidus gradually improved and hydrocortisone treatment was begun at three months after onset, but a month later painless thyroiditis developed. An MRI demonstrated a spontaneous shrinkage of the pituitary mass nine months after onset. Lymphocytic hypophysitis followed by painless thyroiditis was the most probable diagnosis, although it is very uncommon especially among men.
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ranking = 1.0393718248436
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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10/15. Lymphocytic hypophysitis presenting with diabetes insipidus in a 14-year-old girl: case report and review of the literature.

    Lymphocytic hypophysitis is a rare disorder predominantly affecting females during the antepartum or postpartum period. It is characterized by destruction and lymphocytic infiltration of the pituitary gland, probably by an autoimmune process, leading to a pituitary mass lesion and/or various degrees of hypopituitarism. The lesion is usually confined to the adenohypophysis. Posterior pituitary gland or stalk involvement is rare, although patients presenting with diabetes insipidus have been reported. We describe a girl aged 13 years 9 months with lymphocytic hypophysitis who presented with diabetes insipidus and secondary amenorrhea. MRI of the brain revealed a 1 cm enhancing mass in the pituitary stalk. A biopsy of the mass by right pterional craniotomy showed lymphocytic infiltration without neoplastic cells or granuloma formation. To our knowledge, this is the youngest reported patient with a diagnosis of lymphocytic hypophysitis. In this case report, her clinical presentation is discussed along with a review of the literature. CONCLUSION: We present the first childhood case of lymphocytic hypophysitis which is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder of the pituitary gland. Although this is a rare condition in adults, it also needs to be considered in the pediatric population. Conservative management is preferred unless there are signs of increased intracranial pressure. Most importantly, close monitoring for multiple hormone deficiencies is indicated in this condition.
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ranking = 1.2
keywords = diabetes insipidus, insipidus, diabetes
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