Cases reported "Macroglossia"

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1/27. Anesthetic considerations of two sisters with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    Anesthetic considerations of 21-mo-old and 4-yr-old sisters with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome during surgical repair of cleft palate and reduction of macroglossia are presented and discussed. This syndrome is characterized by exomphalos, macroglossia, gigantism, hypoglycemia in infancy, and many other clinical features. This syndrome is also known as exomphalos, macroglossia, and gigantism (EMG) syndrome. Principal problems associated with anesthetic management in this syndrome are hypoglycemia and macroglossia. Careful intraoperative plasma glucose monitoring is particularly important to prevent the neurologic sequelae of unrecognized hypoglycemia. It is expected that airway management would be complicated by the macroglossia, which might cause difficult bag/mask ventilation and endotracheal intubation following the induction of anesthesia and muscle paralysis, so preparations for airway difficulty (e.g., awake vocal cord inspection) should be considered before induction. A nasopharyngeal airway is useful in relieving postoperative airway obstruction.
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ranking = 1
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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2/27. Successful airway control with the laryngeal mask in an infant with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome and hepatoblastoma for central line catheterization.

    We present a case of an infant with severe macroglossia, hypoglycaemia and inguinal hernia associated with hepatoblastoma (beckwith-wiedemann syndrome) in which a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) was useful to secure the airway during central line insertion. carbon dioxide monitoring through LMA proved effective to assess airway patency during positioning for central vein puncture. In this syndrome, where a potentially difficult airway may be encountered, LMA allowed adequate ventilation, avoiding the risk and inconvenience of tracheal intubation.
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ranking = 0.67420198022734
keywords = airway
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3/27. The role of tongue reduction.

    macroglossia may occur as a congenital or acquired condition. The enlarged tongue has both functional and cosmetic deformity, which may affect the oral airway, speech, and the development of the jaws. We discuss the various tongue-reduction procedures and present cases to illustrate the uses of this procedure, its potential complications, and the results.
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ranking = 0.084275247528418
keywords = airway
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4/27. angioedema of the tongue due to acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency.

    We describe the management of an 83-year-old woman who presented with upper airway obstruction due to angioedema of the tongue. Following definitive airway management, investigation showed a diagnosis of acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency (acquired angioedema) that was considered to be subsequent to haematological malignancy. Resolution of the macroglossia followed treatment with C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate, but the patient failed to wean from ventilatory support and died in the intensive care Unit. This case report highlights the potential for acquired angioedema to cause upper airway obstruction. The various treatment modalities for acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency are summarized.
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ranking = 1.5786237623579
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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5/27. Acute edema of the tongue: a life-threatening condition.

    Acute macroglossia is rare, but may cause upper airway obstruction requiring emergency intervention. The cause of the problem is often obscure. Edema of the tongue may be due to angioedema or to allergy. We present several cases of acute edema of the tongue, in 3 cases causing life-threatening airway obstruction. Among these, we present the first case of acute enlargement of the tongue due to the ingestion of artichoke.
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ranking = 1.4943485148295
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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6/27. Assessment of obstructive apnea by using polysomnography and surgical treatment in patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    PURPOSE: Obstructive apnea is sometimes seen in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. The cause of apnea is not limited to macroglossia, and the surgical indication for obstructive apnea has not yet been established. The authors performed polysomnography for the assessment of apnea. METHOD: Overnight polysomnograms were obtained in 2 patients who developed obstructive apnea after 1-stage repair for omphalocele. CASE 1: apnea index (AI), defined as apneic events per hour, indicated 17.3, and SpO2 below 95% occupied 80% of the total sleep time. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated obstruction of the airway between macroglossia and the hypopharynx. Central tongue resection and the division of the frenulum linguae for associated ankyloglossia were performed 97 days after birth. One month after surgery, apneic events disappeared and SpO2 below 95% occupied only 1% of the total sleep time. CASE 2: Obstructive AI indicated 28.1. Division of the frenulum linguae and anterior glossopexy were performed 55 days after birth. Postoperative polysomnogram indicated a marked reduction of AI. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that polysomnography was useful for evaluating obstructive apnea and that advancement of the tongue by division of the frenulum linguae may be recommended for the treatment of obstructive apnea in patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.
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ranking = 0.099817776202994
keywords = airway, obstruction
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7/27. Acute exacerbation of macroglossia.

    We report the case of a large venous malformation of the tongue, preventing the patient from being able to contain it within the oral cavity. The extent of the malformation precluded a complete surgical excision. The immediate problems were; impending airway compromise, inability to speak, eat or drink, severe discomfort due to exposure-induced dryness and an embarrassing spectacle. This case demonstrates that even malformations considered to be incurable may be managed appropriately.
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ranking = 0.084275247528418
keywords = airway
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8/27. Treatment of macroglossia in beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    A case of macroglossia caused by Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome is reported. beckwith-wiedemann syndrome is an overgrowth disorder characterized by a constellation of congenital anomalies. The most common manifestations are omphalocele, macroglossia, gigantism, and visceromegaly. When the tongue reaches a huge dimension, clinical symptoms are represented by dysphagia, alterations in speech, difficulty in chewing, obstruction of the upper airways, and psychologic consequences derived from the patient's physical appearance. The authors describe the surgical strategy performed in the reported case.
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ranking = 0.099817776202994
keywords = airway, obstruction
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9/27. Isolated hemifacial hypertrophy: a case with upper airway obstruction and sensorineural hearing loss.

    Hemifacial hypertrophy is an uncommon developmental disorder characterized by facial asymmetry that involves abnormal bone development and facial enlargement. Many cases of hemihypertrophy have been reported since the first case was reported by Wagner in 1839. We identified a child diagnosed with hemifacial hypertrophy and sensorineural hearing loss who presented with upper airway obstruction and cyanosis. We discuss treatment selection and review the associated head and neck symptoms.
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ranking = 3.7358712870737
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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10/27. dental care management of a young patient with extensive lymphangioma of the tongue: a case report.

    Lymphangiomas are benign tumors resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. Relatively uncommon, lymphangiomas are usually diagnosed at birth and develop within the first years of life. When these tumors occur in the oral cavity, the tongue is the most frequently affected site. lymphangioma of the tongue is a common cause of macroglossia in children, which may lead to a dry/cracked tongue with ulcerating secondary infections, difficulty in swallowing and mastication, speech disturbances, exclusive nasal breathing, airway obstruction, mandibular prognathism and other possible deformities of maxillofacial structures. This paper discusses the most relevant features, clinical manifestations, disease-related impairments and treatment options for lymphangioma of the tongue. It presents the case report of a five-year-old child diagnosed with this lesion, including a description of the patient's dental care management.
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ranking = 0.74717425741475
keywords = airway obstruction, airway, obstruction
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