Cases reported "Macroglossia"

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11/74. Use of a modified occlusal bite guard to treat self-induced traumatic macroglossia (two case reports).

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the use of a bite guard to avoid continued tongue trauma and edema. DESIGN: Two case reports. INTERVENTIONS: Bite raiser. CONCLUSION: muscle relaxation and a bite guard were used in a 16 years old male and 22 years old female with traumatic macroglossia, which allowed for rapid resolution of edema and prevented additional trauma to the tongue.
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keywords = tongue
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12/74. A less-invasive approach with orthodontic treatment in Beckwith-Wiedemann patients.

    The beckwith-wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a rare genetic disorder, linked to an alteration on the short arm of chromosome 11 that comprises multiple congenital anomalies. macroglossia is the predominant finding, with subsequent protrusion of dentoalveolar structures, which results in a protruding mandible, anterior open bite, abnormally obtuse gonial angle and increased mandibular length. A less-invasive treatment with orthopaedic appliances in a patient with early tongue reduction is presented. This work summarizes the oral signs linked to macroglossia, and highlights the influence of macroglossia on mandibular growth structures. In our opinion, glossotomy could be carried out in the paediatric patient as a preventive measure in that it curbs the tongue's influence on skeletal growth and dramatically reduces the duration and extensiveness of subsequent treatment.
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keywords = tongue
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13/74. Symptomatic macroglossia and tongue myositis in polymyositis: treatment with corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin.

    Symptomatic macroglossia occurs in some rare congenital muscle diseases, such as Becker's and Duchenne's dystrophies or Pompe's disease. Herein we describe a case of symptomatic macroglossia with myositis of the tongue occurring in a patient with polymyositis. tongue myositis was evidenced by dysarthria, frequent biting during mastication, swallowing difficulties without aspiration, and noisy breathing. magnetic resonance imaging showed homogeneous hypertrophy of the tongue, especially the mouth's floor muscles. The diagnosis of tongue myositis was established by electromyography and biopsy. No other cause for the macroglossia was found. Symptoms resolved quickly with corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of symptomatic tongue myositis occurring in the course of polymyositis.
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ranking = 4
keywords = tongue
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14/74. macroglossia combined with lymphangioma: a case report.

    A four year old white female with a clinical presentation of macroglossia is described. speech disturbances and occasional episodes of traumatic injury to the tongue with severe bleeding brought the patient to seek dental care. lymphangioma was diagnosed after incisional biopsy. The differential diagnosis of tongue enlargement in children is discussed including review of the literature relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of lymphangioma.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
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15/74. The role of tongue reduction.

    macroglossia may occur as a congenital or acquired condition. The enlarged tongue has both functional and cosmetic deformity, which may affect the oral airway, speech, and the development of the jaws. We discuss the various tongue-reduction procedures and present cases to illustrate the uses of this procedure, its potential complications, and the results.
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ranking = 3
keywords = tongue
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16/74. angioedema of the tongue due to acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency.

    We describe the management of an 83-year-old woman who presented with upper airway obstruction due to angioedema of the tongue. Following definitive airway management, investigation showed a diagnosis of acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency (acquired angioedema) that was considered to be subsequent to haematological malignancy. Resolution of the macroglossia followed treatment with C1 esterase inhibitor concentrate, but the patient failed to wean from ventilatory support and died in the intensive care Unit. This case report highlights the potential for acquired angioedema to cause upper airway obstruction. The various treatment modalities for acquired C1 esterase inhibitor deficiency are summarized.
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ranking = 2.5
keywords = tongue
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17/74. Acute edema of the tongue: a life-threatening condition.

    Acute macroglossia is rare, but may cause upper airway obstruction requiring emergency intervention. The cause of the problem is often obscure. Edema of the tongue may be due to angioedema or to allergy. We present several cases of acute edema of the tongue, in 3 cases causing life-threatening airway obstruction. Among these, we present the first case of acute enlargement of the tongue due to the ingestion of artichoke.
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ranking = 3.5
keywords = tongue
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18/74. Huge lymphangioma of the tongue: a case report.

    lymphangioma of the tongue is relatively rare and may cause facial structural deformity. Using a combination of a V-shaped and central resection, we successfully treated a 6-year-old girl who had massive lymphangioma of the tongue. Postoperatively, her tongue was located completely within her mouth with good cosmetic results. Sensory and motor nerves to the tongue appeared to be intact. Her speech was also improved.
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ranking = 4
keywords = tongue
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19/74. Episodic macroglossia as the sole manifestation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema.

    We describe a patient who had recurrent life-threatening episodes of isolated macroglossia due to the use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. No associated facial, labial, pharyngeal, or laryngeal edema was noted. Aggressive treatment with epinephrine, steroids, and antihistamines resulted in rapid resolution of the tongue swelling and respiratory distress. Recurrent isolated angioedema of the tongue is an extremely rare variant of ACE inhibitor-related angioneurotic edema. The widespread use of ACE inhibitors mandates a special awareness by physicians of this potentially life-threatening yet treatable side effect.
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ranking = 1
keywords = tongue
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20/74. Acquired macroglossia due to lopinavir/ritonavir treatment.

    A hiv-positive patient, 3 months after the treatment initiation with lopinavir-/ritonavir (LPV/r) acquired macroglossia. The tongue biopsy revealed mature adipose tissue accumulated into submucosa. The drug was discontinued and the patient showed a significant improvement. This case is the first case in the medical literature of acquired macroglossia because of LPV/r, a drug causing changes in body fat composition.
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ranking = 0.5
keywords = tongue
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