Cases reported "Macroglossia"

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21/74. Congestive heart failure in a male with "carcinoma tongue": a case of mistaken identity.

    We present a case of primary amyloidosis with macroglossia and restrictive cardiomopathy, that was mistakenly diagnosed as carcinoma of the tongue. He had characteristic echocardiographic findings, and bone marrow plasmacytosis but with normal serum electrophoresis and no Bence Jones proteins in the urine.
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22/74. cleft palate and beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    OBJECTIVE: patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome suffer numerous anomalies, which vary somewhat from case to case. cleft palate in combination with this syndrome has rarely been reported in the literature. Through two cases, this report examines the staging of the surgical repairs and the role of macroglossia in cleft palate and the consequences of the scarred palate on mandibular development. RESULTS: Of four patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome, only two had a cleft palate. The timing of the repair in these two children was different. speech development was satisfactory in the first case but mediocre in the second. This result seemed to be related to a poor social environment. Mandibular prognathism persisted in both cases. CONCLUSION: The treatment of patients with cleft palate and beckwith-wiedemann syndrome remains complex. It is preferable not to operate on a cleft palate before performing a tongue reduction plasty, but rather to combine these two surgical interventions. This would reduce the risks of anesthesia and enable the palate to heal more efficiently. Surgical treatment should be performed after the age of 6 months and before problems in speech development occur. An orthognathic surgery at adolescence could be performed if prognathism persists. While the origin of the cleft palate is still being discussed, we cannot claim that macroglossia is related to the development of cleft palate, nor that the scarred palate has an impact on the mandibular development.
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23/74. Assessment of obstructive apnea by using polysomnography and surgical treatment in patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    PURPOSE: Obstructive apnea is sometimes seen in patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. The cause of apnea is not limited to macroglossia, and the surgical indication for obstructive apnea has not yet been established. The authors performed polysomnography for the assessment of apnea. METHOD: Overnight polysomnograms were obtained in 2 patients who developed obstructive apnea after 1-stage repair for omphalocele. CASE 1: apnea index (AI), defined as apneic events per hour, indicated 17.3, and SpO2 below 95% occupied 80% of the total sleep time. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated obstruction of the airway between macroglossia and the hypopharynx. Central tongue resection and the division of the frenulum linguae for associated ankyloglossia were performed 97 days after birth. One month after surgery, apneic events disappeared and SpO2 below 95% occupied only 1% of the total sleep time. CASE 2: Obstructive AI indicated 28.1. Division of the frenulum linguae and anterior glossopexy were performed 55 days after birth. Postoperative polysomnogram indicated a marked reduction of AI. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicated that polysomnography was useful for evaluating obstructive apnea and that advancement of the tongue by division of the frenulum linguae may be recommended for the treatment of obstructive apnea in patients with beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.
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24/74. macroglossia secondary to systemic amyloidosis: case report and literature review.

    amyloidosis is characterized by an abnormal extracellular deposition of amyloid in different tissues and organs, where it usually causes some type of dysfunction. Its cause is unknown. The two main forms of amyloidosis are systemic and localized; the latter is rare. No satisfactory treatment for systemic amyloidosis has been discovered, and mean survival is poor, ranging from 5 to 15 months depending on the presence or absence of multiple myeloma. We report a case of primary systemic amyloidosis in a 71-year-old man. The diagnosis of amyloidosis was established by tongue biopsy, and its systemic nature was identified by analysis of aspirated abdominal fat. At the 1-year follow-up, the patient's clinical condition had not changed, and he was thereafter lost to follow-up.
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25/74. Acute exacerbation of macroglossia.

    We report the case of a large venous malformation of the tongue, preventing the patient from being able to contain it within the oral cavity. The extent of the malformation precluded a complete surgical excision. The immediate problems were; impending airway compromise, inability to speak, eat or drink, severe discomfort due to exposure-induced dryness and an embarrassing spectacle. This case demonstrates that even malformations considered to be incurable may be managed appropriately.
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26/74. dermoid cyst of the tongue: an association of dermoid cyst with bronchogenic epithelium.

    A congenital dermoid together with a bronchogenic cyst of the tongue is extremely rare. The diagnosis made in this case of a 1-year-old boy was "teratoid cyst of the tongue". A surgical exploration was performed under general anaesthesia via a midline sagittal glossotomy. The tumour was completely dissected and excised, the microscopical examination of the surgical specimen revealed multiple cystic cavities lined by a keratinized squamous epithelium with skin appendages and fatty tissue. Others were composed of cylindrical, ciliated epithelial cells of respiratory type. This is the third reported case in the world literature. All cases were reviewed and compared with this case.
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27/74. Hemimacroglossia caused by isolated plexiform neurofibroma: a case report.

    OBJECTIVES: The present case is a diffuse isolated plexiform neurofibroma of the tongue that was not associated with neurofibromatosis that we treated with intraoral surgery. STUDY DESIGN: A case report. methods: We present a 5-year-old girl with isolated plexiform neurofibroma of the tongue with infiltration of the tongue base and review treatment approaches for this very rare tumor. RESULTS: An intraoral approach appears to be a good alternative method that allows both an acceptable exposure for total excision and limited postoperative sequelae. CONCLUSIONS: Isolated plexiform neurofibroma of the tongue is very rare. It causes a massive macroglossia that is progressive with advance of years and disturbs the patient's speech, occlusion, and tongue movements. Involvement of the tongue may be associated with infiltration into the deep structures of the neck by the tumor, thereby presenting considerable operative difficulties.
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28/74. The oral manifestations of Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis vi): a case report.

    Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is one of the genetic disorders involving disturbances in mucopolysaccharide metabolism resulting in increased storage of acid mucopolysaccharide in various tissues. The basic defect in Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome is a deficiency of arylsulfatase B, which leads to accumulation of dermatan sulfate in tissues and their urinary excretion. The deposition of mucopolysaccharides leads to a progressive disorder involving multiple organs that often results in death in the second decade of life. This disease, which has several oral and dental manifestations, is first diagnosed on the basis of clinical findings. A large head, short neck, corneal opacity, open mouth associated with an enlarged tongue, enlargement of skull, and a long antero-posterior dimension are the main characteristic features. Dental complications can be severe and include unerupted dentition, dentigerous cystlike follicles, malocclusions, condylar defects, and gingival hyperplasia. An 11-year-old boy with Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome (mucopolysaccharidosis type VI) is described in this article, with special emphasis on the oral manifestations.
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29/74. Treatment of macroglossia in beckwith-wiedemann syndrome.

    A case of macroglossia caused by Beckwith Wiedemann syndrome is reported. beckwith-wiedemann syndrome is an overgrowth disorder characterized by a constellation of congenital anomalies. The most common manifestations are omphalocele, macroglossia, gigantism, and visceromegaly. When the tongue reaches a huge dimension, clinical symptoms are represented by dysphagia, alterations in speech, difficulty in chewing, obstruction of the upper airways, and psychologic consequences derived from the patient's physical appearance. The authors describe the surgical strategy performed in the reported case.
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30/74. dental care management of a young patient with extensive lymphangioma of the tongue: a case report.

    Lymphangiomas are benign tumors resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. Relatively uncommon, lymphangiomas are usually diagnosed at birth and develop within the first years of life. When these tumors occur in the oral cavity, the tongue is the most frequently affected site. lymphangioma of the tongue is a common cause of macroglossia in children, which may lead to a dry/cracked tongue with ulcerating secondary infections, difficulty in swallowing and mastication, speech disturbances, exclusive nasal breathing, airway obstruction, mandibular prognathism and other possible deformities of maxillofacial structures. This paper discusses the most relevant features, clinical manifestations, disease-related impairments and treatment options for lymphangioma of the tongue. It presents the case report of a five-year-old child diagnosed with this lesion, including a description of the patient's dental care management.
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