Cases reported "Malocclusion"

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1/206. A three dimensional clinical approach for anterior crossbite treatment in early mixed dentition using an Ultrablock appliance: case report.

    An 8-year-old girl patient presented to pediatric dentistry Department at Tufts University School of Dental medicine for orthodontic consultation. The patient was in early mixed dentition with anterior crossbite and underdeveloped posterior occlusal vertical. Anterior crossbite correction and proper posterior occlusal vertical were established in 6 months of treatment by using an Ultrablock appliance (a removable Ultrablock appliance followed by fixed Ultrablock appliance) which was designed in three dimensions (horizontal, vertical and transverse) on Denar Witzig articulator. An increase of 5 mm in the posterior occlusal vertical is reported.
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2/206. Treatment of a Brodie bite by lower lateral expansion: a case report and fourth year follow-up.

    The patient was a 4 year 4 month old boy at the first visit. The chief complaint was chewing dysfunction. The intra-oral and facial films, study casts, cephalometrics, muscle-balance monitor, temporomandibular joint radiographs were analyzed. The patient presented with a Brodie bite or unilateral posterior cross bite. The upper dental arch was wider than other children of his age. The lower dental arch was significantly smaller than the upper dental arch. The lower dental arch was expanded using a Schwarz appliance. The period of treatment was one year and two months. The period of observation was four years and ten months. First the patient underwent chewing training and secondarily then was treated by lateral expansion. After this treatment the patient achieved good occlusion and muscle function, while the morphology and function of the temporomandibular joints were improved, as well.
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3/206. Treatment planning and biomechanics of distraction osteogenesis from an orthodontic perspective.

    As in traditional combined surgical and orthodontic procedures, the orthodontist has a role in the planning and orthodontic support of patients undergoing distraction osteogenesis. This role includes predistraction assessment of the craniofacial skeleton and occlusal function in addition to planning both the predistraction and postdistraction orthodontic care. Based on careful clinical evaluation, dental study models, photographic analysis, cephalometric evaluation, and evaluation of three-dimensional computed tomographic scans, the orthodontist, in collaboration with the surgeon, plans distraction device placement and the predicted vectors of distraction. Both surgeon and orthodontist closely monitor the patient during the active distraction phase, using intermaxillary elastic traction, sometimes combined with guide planes, bite plates, and stabilization arches, to mold the newly formed bone (regenerate) while optimizing the developing occlusion. Postdistraction change caused by relapse is minimal. growth after mandibular distraction is variable and appears to be dependent on the genetic program of the native bone and the surrounding soft tissue matrix. A significant advantage of distraction osteogenesis is the gradual lengthening of the soft tissues and surrounding functional spaces. Distraction osteogenesis can be applied at an earlier age than traditional orthognathic surgery because the technique is relatively simple and bone grafts are not required for augmentation of the hypoplastic craniofacial skeleton. In this new technique, the surgeon and the orthodontist have become collaborators in a process that gradually alters the magnitude and direction of craniofacial growth.
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4/206. Elastic activator for treatment of open bite.

    This article presents a modified activator for treatment of open bite cases. The intermaxillary acrylic of the lateral occlusal zones is replaced by elastic rubber tubes. By stimulating orthopaedic gymnastics (chewing gum effect), the elastic activator intrudes upper and lower posterior teeth. A noticeable counterclockwise rotation of the mandible was accomplished by a decrease of the gonial angle. Besides the simple fabrication of the device and uncomplicated replacement of the elastic rubber tubes, treatment can be started even in mixed dentition when affixing plates may be difficult.
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5/206. Cephalometric soft tissue facial analysis.

    My objective is to present a cephalometric-based facial analysis to correlate with an article that was published previously in the American Journal of Orthodontic and Dentofacial orthopedics. Eighteen facial or soft tissue traits are discussed in this article. All of them are significant in successful orthodontic outcome, and none of them depend on skeletal landmarks for measurement. Orthodontic analysis most commonly relies on skeletal and dental measurement, placing far less emphasis on facial feature measurement, particularly their relationship to each other. Yet, a thorough examination of the face is critical for understanding the changes in facial appearance that result from orthodontic treatment. A cephalometric approach to facial examination can also benefit the diagnosis and treatment plan. Individual facial traits and their balance with one another should be identified before treatment. Relying solely on skeletal analysis, assuming that the face will balance if the skeletal/dental cephalometric values are normalized, may not yield the desired outcome. Good occlusion does not necessarily mean good facial balance. Orthodontic norms for facial traits can permit their measurement. Further, with a knowledge of standard facial traits and the patient's soft tissue features, an individualized norm can be established for each patient to optimize facial attractiveness. Four questions should be asked regarding each facial trait before treatment: (1) What is the quality and quantity of the trait? (2) How will future growth affect the trait? (3) How will orthodontic tooth movement affect the existing trait (positively or negatively)? (4) How will surgical bone movement to correct the bite affect the trait (positively or negatively)?
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6/206. Perspectives in posterior vertical dimension: three case reports.

    Using a powerful three dimensional perspective, it is possible to control the vertical components of bite opening appliances, which can prove to be valuable in design and application of functional appliances. Several cases are presented to illustrate this orthopedic technique.
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7/206. Treatment of posterior crossbite in mixed dentition with a removable appliance: reports of cases.

    A posterior crossbite malocclusion is defined as an abnormal buccolingual relationship. One or more maxillary teeth improperly occludes with one or more mandibular teeth in centric relation. This alteration develops early and is seldom self-correcting. This study is a report of the benefits of treating posterior cross-bite malocclusions in mixed dentitions using removable appliances.
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8/206. Open-bite relapse. Report of a case.

    Although the tooth positioner was initially helpful in promoting improved esthetics and stability, it in effect became an orthodontic appliance by maintaining the original, treated occlusal plane. Subsequently, the lower third molars erupted above the occlusal plane and caused the mandible to rotate downward and backward, resulting in an unsightly bite opening. Removal of the etiologic factors, the tooth positioner, and third molars corrected the open-bite relapse.
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9/206. Cystic lymphangioma: its orofacial manifestations.

    A patient age five years, nine months with cystic lymphangioma was studied to determine the causes of malocclusion and the optimum time for its treatment. The main findings were unilateral anterior and posterior crossbite and displacement of the mandibular midline due to maxillary deformity and mandibular rotation. The force of the cystic lymphangioma mass caused deformity of the maxilla and rotation of the mandible. The patient had no functional impairment of speech or mastication. A decision was made to defer treatment of malocclusion until complete surgical excision of the cystic lymphangioma can be undertaken, thereby minimizing the chance of malocclusion re-occurrence.
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keywords = bite
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10/206. Treatment of an open-bite malocclusion complicated by clefts of the maxilla and mandible.

    This is a case presentation of a young girl with a severe Class II, Division I open-bite malocclusion. Her orthodontic problems were further complicated by clefts in both her maxilla and mandible. A cleft palate team evaluation brought several systemic and local problems to light which necessitated their correction prior to the commencement of any orthodontic therapy. Her diagnosis and treatment have been discussed here with special emphasis on the problems peculiar to children with oral clefts.
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