Cases reported "Mandibular Diseases"

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1/166. Cystic management in a 10-year old child.

    Cysts are among the most common lesions found in the oral cavity. These may be developmental in origin or secondary to chronic infections. Untreated, cysts may expand causing local tissue destruction and deformities. Basically, two treatment methods are employed. Enucleation and/or Marsupialization. The following case involves a child treated at the College of dentistry, University of the philippines, for a large cystic lesion involving the permanent cuspid and the deciduous dentition. The lesion was accidentally discovered on a panoramic radiograph. The child underwent extraction of deciduous teeth and marsupialization, which later helped in the eruption of the malposed permanent teeth.
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keywords = dental
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2/166. Type 1 gaucher disease presenting with extensive mandibular lytic lesions: identification and expression of a novel acid beta-glucosidase mutation.

    The finding of extensive lytic lesions in the mandible of a 19-year-old Ashkenazi Jewish woman led to the diagnosis of Type 1 gaucher disease. She had extensive skeletal involvement, marked hepatosplenomegaly, and deficient acid beta-glucosidase activity. mutation analysis identified heteroallelism for acid beta-glucosidase mutations N370S and P401L, the latter being a novel missense mutation in exon 9. Expression of the P401L allele resulted in an enzyme with a reduced catalytic activity (specific activity based on cross-reacting immunological material approximately 0.21), which was similar to that of the mild N370S mutant enzyme. The expression studies predicted a mild phenotype for the proposita's N370S/P401L genotype which was inconsistent with her severe diffuse skeletal disease and organ involvement. Since lytic mandibular lesions may be complicated by osteomyelitis, pathologic fracture, and tooth loss, regular dental assessments in Type 1 Gaucher patients should be performed.
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keywords = dental
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3/166. Malignant spindle cell tumor arising in the mandible of a patient with florid osseous dysplasia.

    Florid osseous dysplasia is a non-neoplastic condition of the alveolar processes of the jaws characterized by the replacement of multiple foci of bone by fibrous connective tissue, accompanied by gradual deposition of cementum, bone, or both. The lesions are not associated with inflammatory diseases of the dental pulp or periodontal tissues. In fully developed florid osseous dysplasia, there are multiple lobulated masses in the alveolar bone bilaterally in the mandible and sometimes in the maxilla. This is the first report of a malignancy originating within the jaws of a patient with florid osseous dysplasia. A spindle cell malignancy was diagnosed in the mandible of a 54-year-old black woman whose jaw was affected by florid osseous dysplasia bilaterally. Despite extensive surgery and radiotherapy, the patient died 20 months after diagnosis of the malignancy.
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keywords = dental
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4/166. Treatment of central giant cell granuloma of the jaw with calcitonin.

    Giant cell granuloma of the jaw is a benign lesion that may cause local destruction of bone and displacement of teeth. The common therapy is curettage or resection, which may be associated with loss of teeth and, in younger patients, loss of dental germs. An alternative treatment has recently been introduced, in which patients receive a daily dose of calcitonin. Four patients who have been treated with calcitonin in various concentrations for at least 1 year are reported. In all patients, complete remission of the giant cell granuloma was observed, without signs of recurrence. The working mechanism of calcitonin is discussed, as are length of treatment and optimal dose.
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keywords = dental
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5/166. Gorham's disease: a case (including dental presentation) of vanishing bone disease.

    A case of multicentric vanishing bone disease with maxillofacial involvement in a 4-year-old boy is presented. The clinical and histologic features are described along with the subsequent management of the disease, and the literature concerning this unusual and rare condition is reviewed.
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ranking = 4
keywords = dental
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6/166. Mandibular osteomyelitis caused by Blastoschizomyces capitatus in a child with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    A 6-year-old girl with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) developed fungal mandibular osteomyelitis during chemotherapy. Blastoschizomyces capitatus was recognized histologically by its yeast-like morphology and formation of annelloconidia, and was confirmed by culture. The fungal osteomyelitis of the mandible was treated successfully with prolonged antifungal medication, extensive surgical debridement and an oral care program, without interrupting leukemia chemotherapy. B. capitatus osteomyelitis of the mandible may occur during chemotherapy in AML patients with poor dental condition. Successful treatment can be achieved by careful management without interruption of antineoplastic chemotherapy.
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keywords = dental
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7/166. Case report of a pigmented dentigerous cyst and a review of the literature on pigmented odontogenic cysts.

    This paper reports the first case of a dentigerous cyst containing melanin-pigment and melanocytes in the lining epithelium, and the first case of a odontogenic cyst with macroscopically visible pigmentation in the cyst wall. The patient was a 29-year-old Japanese male with a cystic lesion in the left retromolar area of the mandible. Pathologic examination revealed the lesion to be a dentigerous cyst with or without mild surface keratinization, and numerous granules of melanin-pigment were distributed in the basal cells of the epithelial lining. Furthermore, dendritic melanocytes were scattered in the basal layer. review of the literature revealed that pigmented odontogenic cysts are uncommon, and only 11 cases have been documented; eight were odontogenic keratocyst, one was a gingival cyst, one was a botryoid odontogenic cyst, and one was a lateral periodontal cyst. The possible origin of melanocytes in odontogenic lesions is discussed.
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ranking = 0.48610423248183
keywords = gingival
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8/166. Case report of regional alveolar bone actinomycosis: a juvenile periodontitis-like lesion.

    BACKGROUND: Cervicofacial actinomycosis infection most often involves the mandibular bone and rarely the alveolar crest. methods: We describe a 14-year-old patient who had actinomycosis involving the alveolar bone at the left lower dental quadrant region. Resembling juvenile periodontitis, it was difficult to diagnose properly and resulted in devastating dental and periodontal consequences: loss of one tooth with most of its adjacent regional alveolar bone, severely compromising the support of two other teeth. RESULTS: With the diagnosis came successful treatment, including surgical removal of the soft and hard tissues with concomitant prolonged penicillin administration. CONCLUSIONS: We feel that this case should raise the interest and concern of both the periodontist and the general practitioner so that early diagnosis can be obtained, significantly improving the clinical outcome.
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ranking = 2
keywords = dental
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9/166. actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-associated peri-implantitis in an edentulous patient. A case report.

    BACKGROUND: peri-implantitis is a risk factor for implant loss. Late bacterial infection of the peri-implant tissues and loss of alveolar bone in edentulous patients is caused by commensal oral anaerobic bacteria. In partially edentulous patients, porphyromonas gingivalis and occasionally actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans are associated with peri-implantitis lesions. AIMS: To investigate the microbiology of a peri-implantitis case in an edentulous patient. methods: Anaerobic culture techniques and selective culture techniques for A. actinomycetemcomitans were used to study the peri-implant microflora at sites with and without bone loss. RESULTS: An anaerobic peri-implant microflora with several putative periodontal pathogens was found at sites with bone loss. Furthermore, a metronidazole-resistant A. actinomycetemcomitans was isolated. The A. actinomycetemcomitans infection did not respond to systemic doxycycline therapy, despite good susceptibility in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: The present case of severe A. actinomycetemcomitans-associated peri-implantitis shows the importance of pre-operative infection control. The findings in this case show that remaining teeth affected by periodontitis can be a serious risk factor for peri-implantitis.
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ranking = 0.48610423248183
keywords = gingival
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10/166. Bilateral pneumothorax with extensive subcutaneous emphysema manifested during third molar surgery. A case report.

    This report describes a case of bilateral pneumothorax with extensive subcutaneous emphysema in a 45-year-old man that occurred during surgery to extract the left lower third molar, performed with the use of an air turbine dental handpiece. Computed tomographic scanning showed severe subcutaneous emphysema extending bilaterally from the cervicofacial region and the deep anatomic spaces (including the pterygomandibular, parapharyngeal, retropharyngeal, and deep temporal spaces) to the anterior wall of the chest. Furthermore, bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum were present. In our patient, air dissection was probably caused by pressurized air being forced through the operating site into the surrounding connective tissue.
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ranking = 1
keywords = dental
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