Cases reported "Mandibular Diseases"

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11/34. Vanishing bone disease in a five year old: report of a case and review of the literature.

    Vanishing bone disease is a rare condition of unknown aetiology. It can affect almost any bone, including those of the maxillofacial region. It is most commonly seen in the second and third decades of life. To the author's knowledge, this is the second case reported in the maxillofacial region of a child within the first decade of life, and the first who survived.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone disease
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12/34. osteopetrosis of the jaws.

    osteopetrosis is a rare hereditary condition characterized by increased bone density. The jaws, bones, and teeth invariably are affected and the osteopetrosis is directly proportional with the severity of the disease. This article describes a clinical case of osteopetrosis and reviews the clinicopathologic, radiographic, and treatment features.
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ranking = 4.6514828518346
keywords = osteopetrosis
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13/34. Recalcitrant osteomyelitis following tooth extraction in a case of malignant osteopetrosis.

    Malignant osteopetrosis generally begins in utero and often results in stillbirth. Besides, failure to thrive, increased bone fragility resulting in frequent fractures and recurrent bone infections are the other characteristic features. Infections after tooth extraction and fracture of the sclerotic bone following mild trauma are serious complications, as these ordinarily common problems are very difficult to treat in such patients. Poor bone vascularisation and reduced local defences prolong the defensive response. A rare case of malignant osteopetrosis in a 19-year-old girl, who presented with the complication of osteomyelitis of the mandible following tooth extraction, is presented. The case is of interest for two reasons: it is very rare for a case of malignant osteopetrosis to survive until adulthood and to be aware of the potential dental and oral complications of the disorder.
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ranking = 16.280189981421
keywords = osteopetrosis
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14/34. Gorham's disease of the mandible mimicking periodontal disease on radiograph.

    BACKGROUND: Gorham's disease is a rare disorder characterized by spontaneous and progressive osteolysis of one or more skeletal bones. The radiographic findings associated with Gorham's disease are particularly dramatic, as in some cases a complete resorption of the involved bone can occur, leading to the definition of phantom bone, vanishing bone, or disappearing bone disease. MATERIAL AND methods: A 24-year-old female patient with a previous diagnosis of periodontal disease and progressive mandibular alveolar bone loss was referred to our oral medicine section. The initial radiographic picture showed infrabony defects and horizontal bone loss. RESULTS: After further extensive local and systemic evaluation, including histopathological, laboratory and imagine techniques investigations, the patient was diagnosed to be affected by Gorham's disease. Meanwhile the progression of the osteolytic process had caused the loosening of all the left mandibular teeth and a pathologic fracture. Appropriate medical therapy was successful in stabilizating the resorptive process, with no evidence of further progressive disease. CONCLUSIONS: When Gorham's disease involves the mandible, the role of the periodontologist is extremely important in diagnosing promptly the disorder and preventing the functional and aesthetic consequences of advanced and extensive bone loss. Gorham's disease should be included among the pathologic entities mimicking periodontal disease on radiograph, such as inflammatory disease (e.g. osteomyelitis), endocrine disease (e.g. hyperparathyroidism), intra-osseous malignancies or metastases, lymphoma, histiocytosis X, mainly eosinophilic granuloma, infective process (e.g. tuberculosis and actinomycosis), odontogenic tumours.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone disease
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15/34. jaw bone necrosis without previous dental extractions associated with the use of bisphosphonates (pamidronate and zoledronate): a four-case report.

    jaw bone necrosis is a clinical condition associated with defects in vascularization of the maxilla or the mandibular bone, usually present following head and neck radiotherapy and/or oral surgical interventions. Bisphosphonates are synthetic analogues of pyrophosphate used in the treatment of patients with hypercalcemia as a result of malignancy, bone metastasis and for the treatment of other disorders such as metabolic bone diseases, Paget's disease and osteoporosis. Over last 10 years, cases of jaw bone necrosis have been associated with the use of bisphosphonate therapy. In particular, Ruggiero et al. (J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2004; 62: 527-534) in 2004 described a large group of patients (63) with jaw bone necrosis probably related to the use of these drugs. It should be noted that all the patients in the group described either underwent head and neck radiotherapy or had a dental extraction while taking bisphosphonates. In the present study, we reported four cases of jawbone necrosis in patients taking pamidronate (Aredia) and zoledronate (Zometa) without having undergone any kind of radiotherapy or dental surgery. All the patients were females between the ages of 56 and 71 years; three were treated with bisphosphonates for bone metastasis and one for multiple myeloma. All the patients received surgical treatment with bone curettage, with partial and/or temporary improvement of the lesions. Although a treatment for bisphosphonate-induced bone lesions has not yet been established, we suggest careful evaluation of the patients' oral health before prescribing bisphosphonate treatment.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone disease
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16/34. Maxillofacial fibrous dysplasia.

    Fibrous dysplasia is a non- neoplastic hamartomatous developmental fibro osseous lesion of bone. This paper provides a brief overview of fibrous dysplasia in a historic perspective and highlights the controversies in fibrous dysplasia seen in the cranio- maxillofacial lesions. A case report of a young woman is presented who was diagnosed as having maxillofacial fibrous dysplasia, thereby making an attempt to use this term in cases with relatively limited facial bone disease.
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ranking = 0.2
keywords = bone disease
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17/34. Familial malignant osteopetrosis in children: a case report.

    The clinical, radiological, pathological and laboratory findings of two brothers with autosomal recessive malignant osteopetrosis are presented. Our findings are similar to characteristics previously reported in the literature about patients with osteopetrosis. The 6-year-old male patient was pale and had petechiae on his arms and legs. He also had macrocephalia, splenomegaly, severe pancytopenia, genu valgus, hypocalcemia, amaurosis, cessation of physical development, generalized bone sclerosis and recurrent infections with a history of multiple incidences of acute otitis media. Generalized bone sclerosis and irregular sclerosis of the maxilla and mandible were seen on radiographs. The oral mucosa was apparently normal but permanent tooth eruption was delayed although there was early loss of deciduous teeth. The recommended treatment was blood transfusion and therapy with antibiotics when necessary; a bone marrow transplant was not possible due to lack of a compatible donor.
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ranking = 13.954448555504
keywords = osteopetrosis
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18/34. osteomyelitis of the mandible associated with autosomal dominant osteopetrosis: a case report.

    osteopetrosis is a rare hereditary bone disorder presenting with variable clinical features and is characterized by an increase in bone density. The main clinical findings of the benign-type of osteopetrosis (autosomal dominant) are fractures and osteomyelitis of the mandible, leading to the detection of the disease. We report a case of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis with secondary mandibular osteomyelitis. Clinical and radiological patterns and treatment evaluation were assessed. The patient was referred for evaluation and treatment of an acute abscess in the left side of the face and osteomyelitis of the mandible. Several imaging studies were performed to assess the lesion and the adjacent bone and soft tissue structures. Treatment consisted of intravenous antibiotic therapy, debridement of the necrotic bone and sequestrum, and extra-oral drainage of the abscess, with submandibular access. Healing was uneventful.
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ranking = 13.954448555504
keywords = osteopetrosis
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19/34. osteopetrosis presenting with paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia. A case report.

    osteopetrosis is a rare disease of unknown aetiology. The relentless bone growth may progressively obliterate the various craniofacial skeletal foramina leading to nerve compression and a diversity of neurological disorders. A case is reported of a 37-year-old woman who was seen because of frequent attacks of paroxysmal trigeminal neuralgia (PTN); other orofacial neurologic deficits and generalised craniofacial skeletal thickening. The prompt recognition and management of associated disorders such as PTN is emphasized. Despite the lack of definitive treatment modalities for both osteopetrosis and PTN, the patient's quality of life must be sustained.
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ranking = 2.3257414259173
keywords = osteopetrosis
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20/34. osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with dysosteosclerosis. Report of a case.

    Dysosteosclerosis is a rare bone dysplasia that has radiographic, histopathologic, and clinical similarities to osteopetrosis. This article reviews the dental findings reported in patients with dysosteosclerosis and presents the first reported case of osteomyelitis of the mandible in a patient with this disease. This is also the first report that demonstrates ankylosis of impacted teeth in dysosteosclerosis.
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ranking = 6.8299970666667
keywords = osteopetrosis, osteosclerosis
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