Cases reported "Mandibular Fractures"

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1/46. Inverted, T-shaped silicone implant for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    Reconstruction of the ankylosed temporomandibular joint is a challenging task. speech impairment, difficulties with mastication, poor oral hygiene, facial asymmetry, and mandibular micrognathia results in physical and psychologic disabilities. Various surgical techniques with varying success rates have been reported. Many autogenous and alloplastic materials have been proposed. The authors used an inverted, T-shaped silicone implant for the reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint after the release of the ankylosis in 10 patients without any complications in the postoperative period. The authors assert that the reconstruction of the ankylosed temporomandibular joint with an inverted, T-shaped silicone implant is a reliable and effective alternative. This technique can be used according to the special requirements of each patient and obviating the need for the fixation of the implant and is a safer and better way of using silicone for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.
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2/46. Management of a gunshot wound to the face resulting in a mandibular body fracture with burying of a bicuspid crown into the tongue.

    Gunshot wounds to the maxillofacial region are unpredictable and run the gamut from minor injuries to severe mutilating and life threatening injuries. This patient although unfortunate to have been the victim of mistaken identify resulting in the gunshot wound, was fortunate that the bullet hit his bicuspid, which probably served to deflect its path away from vital structures, thus saving his life. This accounts for the buried bicuspid crown found in the midline of the body of the tongue. Rigid internal fixation of maxillofacial fractures minimizes risks to the airway that may occur if patients are in post-operative maxillo-mandibular fixation during the post-anesthetic recovery phase. In addition, the use of rigid internal fixation speeds up the recovery and the patient's ability to return to function after surgery. Above, we presented an interesting case of a mandibular anterior body fracture resulting from a gunshot wound in the face and resulting in the burying of a bicuspid crown in the substance of the tongue, treated under general nasoendotracheal anesthesia and the use of rigid internal fixation (EDCP).
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3/46. Chain saw injury of the mandibulofacial region.

    Use of chain saws is hazardous. Public understanding of the hazards and of modern types of chain saws will eventually help in preventing these injuries. An injury of the mandibulofacial region resulting from a chain saw has been described with special emphasis on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative management.
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keywords = operative
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4/46. Mandibular fracture resulting from dog bite: report of a case.

    The diagnosis and management of a fractured mandible of a 4-year old child has been presented. A brief review of the literature is given. The remarkable aspect of the case is its reported cause of dog bite. The patient was managed conservatively by closed reduction, and use of Oliver loops. The maxillomandibular fixation was lost on the 11th postoperative day. At that time, no mandibular deviation or limitation of movement was noted. Further immobilization was not deemed necessary. During a three-month follow-up period, no complications occurred.
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5/46. Sevoflurane mask anesthesia for urgent tracheostomy in an uncooperative trauma patient with a difficult airway.

    PURPOSE: Proper care of the trauma patient often includes tracheal intubation to insure adequate ventilation and oxygenation, protect the airway from aspiration, and facilitate surgery. airway management can be particularly complex when there are facial bone fractures, head injury and cervical spine instability. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 29-yr-old intoxicated woman suffered a motor vehicle accident. Injuries consisted of multiple abrasions to her head, forehead, and face, right temporal lobe hemorrhage, and complex mandibular fractures with displacement. mouth opening was <10 mm. blood pressure was 106/71 mm Hg, pulse 109, respirations 18, temperature 37.3 degrees C, SpO2 100%. Chest and pelvic radiographs were normal and the there was increased anterior angulation of C4-C5 on the cervical spine film. Drug screen was positive for cocaine and alcohol. The initial plan was to perform awake tracheostomy with local anesthesia. However, the patient was uncooperative despite sedation and infiltration of local anesthesia. Sevoflurane, 1%, inspired in oxygen 100%, was administered via face mask. The concentration of sevoflurane was gradually increased to 4%, and loss of consciousness occurred within one minute. The patient breathed spontaneously and required gentle chin lift and jaw thrust. A cuffed tracheostomy tube was surgically inserted without complication. Blood gas showed pH 7.40, PCO2 35 mm Hg, PO2 396 mm Hg, hematocrit 33.6%. Diagnostic peritoneal lavage was negative. Pulmonary aspiration did not occur. Oxygenation and ventilation were maintained throughout the procedure. CONCLUSION: Continuous mask ventilation with sevoflurane is an appropriate technique when confronted with an uncooperative trauma patient with a difficult airway.
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6/46. Failed closed reduction of a bifocal mandibular fracture because of dislocation of the mandibular ramus behind the styloid: case report.

    We present an unusual dislocation of the mandibular ramus after a low condylar fracture associated with a fracture of the opposite body of mandible. As closed reduction failed, both fracture sites were exposed. The mandibular ramus was dislocated behind the styloid process, which was not shown on the preoperative radiographs. The intermediate fragment was freed and the fractures treated by miniplate osteosynthesis. The patient made an uneventful recovery with no residual deformity.
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7/46. case reports: the use of intermaxillary screws to achieve intermaxillary fixation in the treatment of mandibular fractures.

    INTRODUCTION: Treatment of mandibular fractures commonly involves the use of arch bars in temporary maxillo-mandibular fixation (also called intermaxillary fixation) to aid bone plating, for the postoperative application of light elastic traction to correct minor occlusal discrepancies and intermaxillary fixation for post reduction immobilisation. The purpose of this paper is to describe a quick and simple alternative for intermaxillary fixation. CLINICAL PICTURE: Three cases of mandibular fractures are presented to demonstrate the use of intermaxillary screws instead of conventional arch-bar wiring. TREATMENT: Two cases were treated with closed reduction methods while the other case was treated with open reduction. OUTCOME: Subsequent fracture healing was not compromised using this technique. CONCLUSIONS: With careful case selection, successful treatment outcome may be achieved using this time-saving and technically simple procedure. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the intermaxillary screws are discussed.
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8/46. A fractured mandible, from initial operation to removal of tantalum mesh. Report of a case.

    Report is made of a case of fracture of the angle of the mandible. Treatment was attempted with the Sampson pericortical bone clamp, but was unsuccessful. Routine use of intraosseous wire led to a localized osteomyelitis, without union of the fracture. Treatment then was made with a particulate marrow graft contained within a tantalum mesh screen. The screen was removed 30 months postoperatively.
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9/46. Treatment of mandibular-condylar fractures.

    Particularly with true dislocation fractures, nonoperative treatment with maxillomandibular fixation followed by physiotherapeutic exercises leads to poor results, as was proved with axiography and clinical examinations. The main reason for this is the shortening and scarring of the condyloid process and the lack of function of the lateral pterygoid muscle. The condyle with its insertion of the muscle is usually displaced medially and anterially and nearly in touch with the origin on the pterygoid process so that protrusion by the muscle is no longer possible. The physiologic relationship of the lateral pterygoid muscle is restored after reduction of the condyle and osteosynthesis of the condylar neck fracture and the original distance between origin and insertion of the muscle is re-established and is a fundamental necessity for regaining function (Fig. 40). The anchor screw osteosynthesis is a most effective technique with low limitations for its indication. A comparison with plates shows this technique to be very economic because one anchor screw has the effect of at least one five-hole plate with five plating screws. That means a reduction of osteosynthesis implants of up to 80%, which saves a lot of money. On the other hand, the sophisticated technique of an anchor screw osteosynthesis needs some training on the part of the surgeon to get the best results possible. In general, we could realize that the anchor screw osteosynthesis gives a perfect adaptation of the fracture ends with compression also on the inner cortical layer, which with plates is only possible in rare cases. After an osteosynthesis of mandibular condyle neck fractures with an axial anchor-screw there are a few cases with an absorptive process in the fracture interface where the screw migrates in an axial direction with loosening of the osteosynthesis. This effect can be compared with the effect of a dynamic hip screw, which leads to compression of the callus, which speeds up bony union at the expense of shortening the bone. When the same absorption happens using a plate, the fracture ends cannot become sintered and the plate is in danger of fracturing as a result of metal fatigue. Ceipek evaluated 136 patients with mandibular condylar neck fractures treated with axial anchor screw osteosynthesis. Thirty-six of these screws showed signs of migration, but only 3.7% for more than 4 mm. For the migration process there are some important risk factors: difficult repositioning of the proximal fragment, dorsal luxation fracture, indirect method of anchor screw osteosynthesis, narrow condyle neck, no intercuspation in the molar region, no compliance, and disturbance of bone healing. Another stable technique of osteosynthesis should be used if patients show more risk than one risk factor.
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10/46. Traumatic avulsion and reconstruction of the midface.

    Traumatic loss of midface soft tissue and supporting structures may result in communication between the oral and nasal cavities. Reconstruction requires both oral and nasal lining, as well as supporting structures. The need for multilaminar tissue, as well as the paucity of local tissue, creates a reconstructive challenge. This case report describes the reconstruction of a traumatic defect of the alveolus, hard palate, inferior orbits, and local soft tissues. An intraoperative alginate mold facilitated a three-dimensional understanding of the wound, and allowed translation of an osseomyocutaneous groin flap to reconstruct the defect in one stage.
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