Cases reported "Mandibular Neoplasms"

Filter by keywords:



Filtering documents. Please wait...

1/213. leiomyosarcoma presenting as a mandibular gingival swelling: a case report.

    We report a case of primary low-grade leiomyosarcoma of the mandible in an otherwise healthy young woman. The neoplasm presented as a painful, pericoronal gingival swelling that mimicked an acute periodontal infection. It was managed accordingly, with curettage, debridement, and antibiotics. When the lesion failed to respond to this treatment approach, a biopsy was performed. microscopy revealed a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm which, on immunohistochemistry analysis, demonstrated reactivity for smooth muscle actin (SMA) and vimentin. This established the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma; subsequently, an en bloc resection of mandibular bone and overlying soft tissue was performed. Close follow-up for over 10 years has revealed no evidence of recurrent or metastatic disease. Since the patient was taking oral contraceptives prior to the onset of the lesion, a possible link between estrogen and smooth muscle tumors is considered.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

2/213. Primary leiomyosarcoma of the mandible in a 7-year-old girl: report of a case and review of the literature.

    leiomyosarcoma is a malignant neoplasm of smooth muscle origin that manifests itself uncommonly in the oral cavity because of the paucity of smooth muscle in that location. To the best of our knowledge, only 10 cases of leiomyosarcoma primary to the jawbones have been reported in the English language literature. We report the first pediatric case of leiomyosarcoma arising from the mandible. facial asymmetry and swelling were accompanied by a rapidly growing exophytic soft tissue mass that caused buccal displacement of the mandibular left permanent first molar. The lesion, observed radiographically as an extensive ill-defined area of osteolytic alveolar destruction, perforated the lingual cortex, displaced the inferior alveolar nerve canal inferiorly, and produced a "floating-in-air" appearance of the first molar. diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma was made after initial incisional biopsy of the lesion. A 5-cm segmental mandibulectomy and supraomohyoid neck dissection were followed by reconstruction with a dynamic mandibular reconstruction plate and placement of a multidimensional mandibular distraction device in a transport rectangle of bone to promote bifocal distraction osteogenesis. Forty millimeters of distraction (the technical limit of the device) were performed; this was followed by terminal iliac crest bone grafting. Seventeen months after the definitive surgical procedure, the patient remains free of disease.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

3/213. Transformation of ameloblastic fibroma to fibrosarcoma.

    The direct transformation of an ameloblastic fibroma into a fibrosarcoma in a 16-year-old Caucasian male is reported. Although no ameloblastic epithelium was found in the recurrent tumor, the odontogenic origin of the fibrosarcoma was evident. The ameloblastic fibrosarcoma and the fibrosarcoma of identical odontogenic origin represent an entity which should be distinguished from conventional fibrosarcoma as these tumors demonstrate different clinical behaviors.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.5
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

4/213. Lymphosarcoma of the mandible associated with macroglobulinemia of Waldenstrom.

    waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is a rare progressive immunoproliferative disorder involving lymphocytes and occasionally plasma cells. Unlike the multiple myeloma, this disease has minimal osseous lesions. Lesions in the jaws are very rare. This paper presents a case of lymphosarcoma in the mandible in a 68-year-old woman, who was diagnosed as suffering from waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. The possibility of immunosuppression by Leukeran as an aetiologic factor causing the bone lesions is suggested.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

5/213. Osteogenic sarcoma with skeletal muscle metastases.

    Two cases of osteogenic sarcoma with skeletal muscle metastases are described. A 40-year-old woman presented with progressive swelling of both calves and a soft tissue back lump. She had been diagnosed with mandibular chondroblastic osteogenic sarcoma 6 years earlier. Radiographs showed calcified masses. MRI scans and bone scintigraphy revealed multiple soft tissue masses in both calves. Bone scintigraphy also showed uptake in the back lump, right thigh and left lung base. biopsy confirmed metastatic chondroblastic osteogenic sarcoma, which initially responded well to chemotherapy. However, the metastatic disease subsequently progressed rapidly and she died 21 months after presentation. The second case concerns a 20-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture of the humerus, which was found to be due to osteoblastic osteogenic sarcoma. He developed cerebral metastases 17 months later, followed by metastases at other sites. Calcified masses were subsequently seen on radiographs of the abdomen and chest. CT scans confirmed the presence of densely calcified muscle metastases in the abdominal wall, erector spinae and gluteal muscles. The patient's disease progressed rapidly and he died 30 months after presentation.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1.3333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

6/213. Large cell, epithelioid, telangiectatic osteoblastoma: a unique pseudosarcomatous variant of osteoblastoma.

    A previously undescribed large-cell, epithelioid, and aneurysmal variant of osteoblastoma with minimal osteoid-production--simulating telangiectatic osteosarcoma, epithelioid angiosarcoma, and metastatic carcinoma is reported. The tumor occurred in the mandible of a 14-year-old girl. The light microscopic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, cell proliferation, and dna-ploidy studies, as well as the 7-year disease-free follow-up period all indicate a benign osteoblastic tumor. Cytogenetically, the tumor had a pseudodiploid karyotype, distinguished by a complex t(1;5;17;22) and a terminal 1q deletion. Recognition of this unique, pseudomalignant variant of osteoblastoma is important to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of malignancy.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

7/213. Metastatic neuroblastoma of the mandible mimicking osteogenic sarcoma radiologically. Case report.

    This paper presents a case of a neuroblastoma of the adrenal gland metastasizing to the mandible of a 21-month-old infant, which presented radiographically as the so-called 'sun-ray' appearance, characteristic of osteogenic sarcoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

8/213. Parosteal osteogenic sarcoma of the mandible, Existence masked by diffuse periodontal inflammation.

    A 38-year-old man was in a state of poor oral hygiene, with multiple broken carious teeth and diffuse inflammatory hyperplasia of the gingival tissues. A mandibular, alveolar soft tissue mass in the premolar-molar region was noted on the right side, in continuity with the gingival hyperplasia. biopsy of the lesion ruled out a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent extraction of his teeth, and all hyperplastic tissues including the tumefaction were excised. Five months later, the patient had a recurrent mass in the same location that was removed via hemimandibulectomy. The mass was diagnosed as a parosteal osteogenic sarcoma.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 0.83333333333333
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

9/213. Surgical management of osteogenic sarcoma of the mandible.

    Osteogenic sarcoma is the most common malignant tumor of the mandible. It is less aggressive than osteogenic sarcoma of the long bones, and mortality is often due to local persistence or intracranial extension. We report such a case to emphasize that disarticulation of the mandible is necessary, since clinical and pathologic evaluation of tumor extent may be impossible. Except for parasymphysial lesions, disarticulation with midline hemimandibulectomy and frozen section assessment of all margins is recommended.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)

10/213. skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma--three case reports.

    Three cases of skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma were treated. The metastatic lesion was located at the midline of the skull above the superior sagittal sinus in all cases. Surgery was performed in two patients with solitary skull lesions involving short segments of the superior sagittal sinus without remarkable systemic metastasis, resulting in good outcome. The third patient had extensive, multiple tumors involving the superior sagittal sinus which could not be excised, and died due to intracranial hypertension. The surgical indication for skull metastasis of Ewing's sarcoma depends on the location and length of the involved superior sagittal sinus, and general condition.
- - - - - - - - - -
ranking = 1
keywords = sarcoma
(Clic here for more details about this article)
| Next ->


Leave a message about 'Mandibular Neoplasms'


We do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site. Click here for the full disclaimer.