Cases reported "Maxillary Diseases"

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1/117. A previously unreported surgical technique utilizing five different grafting materials to successfully achieve simultaneous alveolar regeneration and closure of a large oronasal defect.

    This case report describes the successful surgical and restorative management of an unusual cyst-granuloma combination that had expanded to perforate the labial and nasal parts of the maxillary bone. Enucleation and curettage of the lesions resulted in a large oronasal communication that presented a reconstructive challenge. Five different graft and/or barrier materials were used to close the oral and nasal openings and to regenerate the alveolus for implant placement and for aesthetic prosthetic restoration.
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keywords = bone
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2/117. Maxillofacial osteonecrosis in a patient with multiple "idiopathic" facial pains.

    Previous investigations have identified focal areas of alveolar bone tenderness, increased mucosal temperature, abnormal anesthetic response, radiographic abnormality, increased radioisotope uptake on bone scans, and abnormal marrow within the quadrant of pain in patients with chronic, idiopathic facial pain. The present case reports a 53-year-old man with multiple debilitating, "idiopathic" chronic facial pains, including trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial neuralgia. At necropsy he was found to have numerous separate and distinct areas of ischemic osteonecrosis on the side affected by the pains, one immediately beneath the major trigger point for the lancinating pain of the trigeminal neuralgia. This disease, called NICO (neuralgia-inducing cavitational osteonecrosis) when the jaws are involved, is a variation of the osteonecrosis that occurs in other bones, especially the femur. The underlying problem is vascular insufficiency, with intramedullary hypertension and multiple intraosseous infarctions occurring over time. The present case report illustrates the extreme difficulties involved in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.
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ranking = 3
keywords = bone
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3/117. Radionuclide bone scanning in the diagnosis of lesions of the maxillofacial region.

    Radionuclide scanning is a safe, simple, sensitive technique for demonstrating lesions of the skeletal system. It has proved to be valuable in the early detection and differential diagnoses of lesions involving the maxillofacial region. Abnormal uptake of a bone scanning agent relies on a disturbance of the mineral metabolism of bone. These changes in the pathophysiology of bone are detected earlier on radioisotope bone scans than on radiographs. Bone scanning is a superior technique for diagnosis when compared to radiographic examination. A positive scan is not pathognomonic of any specific disease, but with the clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings, it can differentiate many lesions and contribute invaluable information concerning a particular lesion or condition so that treatment can be more effectively planned.
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ranking = 8
keywords = bone
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4/117. Gorham's disease: a case (including dental presentation) of vanishing bone disease.

    A case of multicentric vanishing bone disease with maxillofacial involvement in a 4-year-old boy is presented. The clinical and histologic features are described along with the subsequent management of the disease, and the literature concerning this unusual and rare condition is reviewed.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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5/117. Multiple maxillary and mandibular exostoses associated with multiple dermatofibromas: a case report.

    exostoses of the maxilla and mandible are nodular protuberances of mature bone that need to be accurately distinguished from other more diagnostically significant lesions, notably exosteal osteomas. Multiple dermatofibromas are rare and may be associated with altered immune function. We report the case of an otherwise healthy 47-year-old woman who was first seen with multiple maxillary and mandibular exostoses associated with multiple dermatofibromas. This association has not been previously reported.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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6/117. Computerized tomography in the management and follow-up of extensive periapical lesion.

    Radiographs are good diagnostic aids in endodontics, although they have limitations. The purpose of this article is to discuss the use of computerized tomography in differential diagnosis, treatment planning, follow-up and overall clinical management of complex periapical lesions. A clinical case of an extensive symptomatic periapical lesion of the upper jaw is presented, in which the use of computerized tomography allowed evaluation of the true extent of the lesion and its spatial relationship to important anatomical landmarks. Computerized tomography also provided specific information about the type of lesion and the degree of bone repair which had taken place 18 months after non-surgical treatment had been completed.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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7/117. Postoperative maxillary cyst following sinus bone graft: report of a case.

    Sinus bone grafting with autogenous bone is routinely performed to allow placement of endosseous dental implants. Although numerous maxillary sinuses have been successfully grafted, some complications of this procedure have been reported. These include maxillary sinusitis, resorption, infection and possible failure of grafts, loss of implants after 1-stage surgery, and oroantral fistulae. Only one case of postoperative maxillary cyst developing in the graft has been reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a similar case that necessitated grafting of the cyst with autologous iliac bone.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bone
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8/117. Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia: a case report and review of the literature.

    Segmental odontomaxillary dysplasia (SOD) is a rare, unilateral developmental disorder of the maxilla involving abnormal growth and maturation of the bone, lack of one or both premolars, altered primary molar structure, delayed tooth eruption, and fibrous hyperplasia of the gingiva. In this, the twenty-third reported case of SOD, the literature is reviewed, and the clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic data are described. Computed tomographic scans of this case showed that the involved segment of the maxilla extends mesiodistally from the permanent cuspid to the mesial portion of the first permanent molar, largely limited to the area of the missing premolars. However, the affected bone extends superiorly in the lateral wall of the maxilla to the zygoma and base of the orbit. This article is intended to serve as baseline data for a future article, describing the natural history and possible treatment of SOD, which remain undocumented.
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ranking = 2
keywords = bone
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9/117. Recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma of hard palate: role of Tc-99m-MDP three-phase bone scan.

    A 42-year-old female presented with pain in the hard palate following surgical curettage for giant cell reparative granuloma. Radiographs of the face at this time did not reveal any abnormality. The surgeons' query was to differentiate fibrosis from recurrence before considering her for recurettage. The three-phase bone scan helped in establishing the diagnosis of recurrence, which was confirmed after histological examination of the curettaged tissue.
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ranking = 5
keywords = bone
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10/117. Persistent pain related to root canal filling and apical fenestration: a case report.

    Endodontic treatments may give rise to persistent pain whose origin is sometimes difficult to determine. Although it is unusual, pain may occur due to apical fenestrations following endodontic treatment. If this occurs, the solution is surgical intervention. This surgical procedure consists of raising a flap to expose the fenestration, followed by curettage of any overextended canal filling materials that may be potentially irritating to the underlying mucosa, remodeling of the apex, and its repositioning below the level of the cortical bone. A case is described that illustrates this clinical situation. The case also demonstrates information that can be obtained from tomodensitometric films.
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ranking = 1
keywords = bone
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