Cases reported "Maxillary Fractures"

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1/8. Unusual dental injuries following facial fractures: report of three cases.

    We report 3 cases of unusual dental injuries following facial fractures. The first patient sustained intrusion of a maxillary incisor into the nasal cavity following a mandibular fracture. The tooth dislocated into the pharynx and was found lodged in the piriform fossa during surgery. The second patient sustained intrusion of molars into the maxillary sinus following maxillary and mandibular fractures. His treatment was delayed due to life-threatening hemorrhage. The third case involved ingestion of multiple avulsed teeth into the alimentary tract following severe maxillofacial fractures. Although the diagnosis was made more than a week after the injury, the patient did not suffer any complications as a result of the dental avulsion. The aim of this report is to emphasize the possibility of associated dental injuries in patients with facial fractures. The trauma surgeon should be cognizant of the importance of carrying out a thorough intraoral examination during the initial evaluation. Any missing tooth should be considered as possibly displaced into other tissue compartments, and must be routinely searched for with x-rays of the skull, cervical spine, chest, and abdomen. If full intrusion injury is suspected, further diagnostic investigation with facial computed tomography scanning may be worth while.
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2/8. Reposition of intruded permanent incisor by a combination of surgical and orthodontic approach: a case report.

    This report presents a case of a completely intrusive luxation of an immature permanent central incisor in a 7 years 9 months-old girl. Because there are severe intrusive trauma and cortical alveolar bone fracture, it was impossible to reposition with orthodontic or surgical method alone. The intruded tooth was repositioned to healthy alveolar bone level by using surgical extrusion and stabilization with sutures and periodontal pack. After healing of adjacent bone, the intruded maxillary central incisor erupted orthodontically by removable orthodontic appliance. It was moved from a high position to level of adjacent tooth in about 7 months. A radiograph was taken 6 months after ceasing forced eruption, which demonstrated minor root resorption, but the alveolar bone height had increased.
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3/8. Orthodontic fine adjustment after vertical callus distraction of an ankylosed incisor using the floating bone concept.

    The outcome of vertical callus distraction of a segment of tooth-supporting alveolar process might be functionally and esthetically unsatisfactory because of the unidirectional impact of intraoral distraction devices. In this case report, we describe how, with a shortened consolidation phase and application of the floating bone effect, the tooth-supporting osteotomy segment can be successfully aligned 3 dimensionally. We applied orthodontic force systems that went beyond the unidirectional vector preset by the mechanical properties of the distraction device.
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4/8. Lack of tooth eruption following maxillary fracture: case report.

    Aberrant tooth development following facial fractures is unusual. It is commonly reported that tooth buds involved in the line of a mandibular fracture will continue to develop normally and erupt sequentially. Few cases have been cited regarding developing teeth in the line of maxillary fractures. In the case reported, the normal growth and position of a maxillary third molar can be seen to be retarded at the position of a maxillary fracture, sustained by a child in the mixed dentition phase of dental development.
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5/8. An extraction complicated by lateral and medial pterygoid tethering of a fractured maxillary tuberosity.

    We report a case in which the extraction of an upper second molar was complicated by a maxillary tuberosity fracture. Delivery of the tooth and bone fragment under local anaesthesia was unable to be achieved because of pain, brisk bleeding and tethering by the lateral and medial pterygoid muscles. The eventual removal of the fragment under general anaesthetic required the control of haemorrhage deep within the infratemporal fossa. When this complication is recognised by the general dentist the maxillary tuberosity should not be removed and the patient referred to a specialist unit.
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6/8. Management of the perforations due to miniplate application.

    Microdimensioned osteosynthesis using miniplates has been common practice in maxillofacial surgery. However, tooth injury during the application of the miniplates have been reported in few papers. In this case, a 32-yr-old female patient, whose two teeth were necrosed because of the perforation during screw insertion was presented. The reason of the perforations during the rigid internal fixation was the lack of radiographic assessment because of the pregnancy. Maxillary right first premolar and maxillary left canine were perforated and necrosed because of the screw insertion. The necrosed teeth were detected 1 yr after the rigid internal fixation. The root canals of nonvital teeth were filed using step-down approach. Cold lateral condensation of gutta-percha was used to fill the canals. Six-month recall visits were scheduled and there was no problem after 2-yr follow-up period.
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7/8. Prosthetic restoration following maxillary trauma utilising a fixed removable implant-supported prosthesis: a case report.

    patients with traumatic head injuries may suffer from tooth loss, as well as involvement of associated soft tissues and bone. Conventional prostheses are often bulky and unretentive. Osseo-integrated implants have made it possible to treat these patients with more retentive, aesthetically and functionally improved prostheses. This case illustrates the use of a fixed removable implant-supported prosthesis for a patient with severe maxillary trauma. A bar connecting the implants was individually designed to have parallel sides and vertical channels prepared in it. The corresponding removable prosthesis features retentive pins which engage the prepared grooves in the bar to provide adequate frictional retention and stability for the prosthesis. This treatment modality restored the missing teeth, alveolar bone, soft tissues and oral function while at the same time facilitating good oral hygiene.
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8/8. Management of facial trauma in children: A case report.

    Children are uniquely susceptible to cranio facial trauma because of their greater cranial mass to body ratio. Below the age of 5, the incidence of pediatric facial fractures in relation to the total is very low ranging from 0.6-1.2%. Maxillo-facial injuries may be quite dramatic causing parents to panic and the child to cry uncontrollably with blood, tooth and soft tissue debris in the mouth. The facial disfigurement caused by trauma can have a deep psychological impact on the tender minds of young children and their parents. This case report documents the trauma and follow up care of a 4-year-old patient with maxillofacial injuries.
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