Cases reported "Maxillary Neoplasms"

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1/157. ameloblastoma of the maxilla. Case report.

    A basal cell maxillary ameloblastoma became obvious as an asymptomatic swelling of the left buccal sulcus and alveolar process, although a large extension into the maxillary sinus up to the nasal conchae and the orbital floor had already occurred. The painless and slow growth of the lesion, the thin bone of the upper jaws, the adjacent cavities and the vital structures are the main factors for delay in recognition and thus the potentially lethal result of a maxillary ameloblastoma. A review of location, age, sex and race predilection, clinical course, radiographic appearance, histological types and treatment methods in made.
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2/157. Juvenile ossifying fibroma: an ultrastructural study.

    The ultrastructural features of a juvenile ossifying fibroma of the maxilla are described. The stromal portion of the tumor was composed of osteoblasts and to a lesser extent of fibroblasts. The bone spicules were rimmed by osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Calcification was seen to occur along the collagen fiber matrix, corresponding to calcification of osteoid, and also in the form of intracellular and extracellular crystallization. The latter form of calcification corresponded to so-called psammoma-like bodies, and was considered characteristic of this subtype of ossifying fibroma.
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3/157. Reconstruction of the pediatric maxilla and mandible.

    BACKGROUND: The creation of osseous defects in the upper and lower jaws in children is an uncommon occurrence. It is therefore likely that a head and neck reconstructive surgeon will accumulate only limited experience in restoring such defects. We have reviewed 7 pediatric bone-containing microvascular free flap reconstructions in 6 patients for reconstruction of the upper or lower jaws. Three patients were available for long-term follow-up to evaluate the effect of osseous free flap reconstruction on function and growth and development of the donor site. DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Academic tertiary referral center for otolaryngology. patients AND methods: Six pediatric patients ranging in age from 8 to 16 years underwent 2 fibular, 4 scapular, and 1 iliac free flap procedure for restoration of 2 maxillary and 5 mandibular defects from 1992 to 1997. Three of the 6 patients were available for long-term follow-up to assess the postoperative donor site function in an effort to determine the effect of this surgery on long-term donor site morbidity and development. RESULTS: Two patients were lost to follow-up, and 1 died secondary to complications related to distant metastatic disease. Three of 6 patients were observed for 2 years 6 months, 4 years, and 4 years 2 months, respectively. Two of the 3 patients who were observed long term have undergone full dental rehabilitation and currently maintain a regular diet and deny pain with mastication or deglutition. One patient did not require dental rehabilitation. All 3 patients demonstrate gross facial symmetry and normal dental occlusion. Assessment of the fibular donor site demonstrated normal limb length and circumference. The patients denied pain or restriction to recreational activity. Scapular donor sites demonstrated normal range of motion, strength, and shoulder stability. CONCLUSIONS: Free flap reconstruction of the pediatric maxilla and mandible requires harvesting bone from actively growing donor sites. We have found no evidence of functional deficit after bone harvest from the fibular or scapular donor sites. patients demonstrate normal growth at the donor sites, and symmetry of the mandible and maxilla is preserved.
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4/157. Burkitt's lymphoma presenting with jaw lesions.

    We report an unusual case of Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) presenting with jaw lesions in a 14-year-old Chinese boy. The patient presented initially with mobile teeth in all 4 jaw quadrants, with corresponding radiographic detection of alveolar bone crest destruction and periapical bone resorption in the absence of clinically detectable jaw tumors. Moreover, radiographs taken only 17 days later showed clearly distinguishable signs of more extensive alveolar bone destruction compared with the initial radiographs.
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5/157. Trans-osseous passage of head and neck brachytherapy tubes.

    brachytherapy following surgical resection of head and neck malignancy is a useful adjunct if full dose external beam radiotherapy has been performed previously. Percutaneous tube placement has been described but accurate placement can be technically difficult in certain areas of the head and neck. A case report is presented of trans-osseous brachytherapy tube placement through the zygoma bone to allow for optimum surgical bed irradiation without kinking of the tubes. It is proposed that the trans-osseous placement is a useful technique when siting of the tubes is difficult.
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6/157. Treatment of giant cell granuloma of the maxilla with intralesional injection of steroids.

    BACKGROUND: Giant cell granuloma is rare in the head and neck region and most commonly affects the maxilla and mandible. Although it is a benign disease process, it may be locally destructive. Surgery is the treatment currently recommended. Because of the location of the disease, surgery may be disfiguring. Because it is a benign process, less radical nonsurgical treatment alternatives are desirable. methods: A case report of a giant cell granuloma treated with steroid injections. RESULTS: After six weekly intralesional steroid injections, a giant cell granuloma of the maxilla became calcified and smaller. After a follow-up period of 2 years, there was no evidence of regrowth, and the bony osteolytic lesion had filled with bone. A review of the literature revealed two case reports of successful steroid injections with similar response. CONCLUSIONS: Steroid injections are a viable alternative in the treatment of giant cell granuloma, which may avoid surgery.
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7/157. Primary insertion of implants in the zygomatic bone following subtotal maxillectomy.

    A case of maxillary carcinoma treated with primary insertion of Branemark implants into the zygomatic bone following subtotal maxillectomy is reported. This method has several advantages. First, early detection of postoperative recurrence is easier than with closing the flap. Second, when the implant is inserted into the midfacial region, zygomatic bone can be useful because of thickness. In addition, applying a maxillary prosthesis in the early stages avoids contracture of facial soft tissue. This primary reconstructive method is effective in cases of preserved zygoma after total maxillectomy.
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8/157. Inheritance of Hippel-Lindau disease: a rare case of maxillary bone metastasis.

    A rare case of familial Hippel-Lindau disease, which is an autosomal dominant disorder with inherited susceptibility to various forms of cancer, is reported in a 46-year-old father and his sons. The father complained of a malignant hypernephroma, which metastasized in the upper jaw 6 months later. As in this patient, renal cell carcinomas are fatal and are exhibited at an early age. Consequentially, patients with familial von hippel-lindau disease exhibiting cases of renal cell carcinoma should be examined very carefully in the head and neck region to detect and treat metastases as early as possible.
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9/157. Compound odontoma--diagnosis and treatment: three case reports.

    Odontomas are the most common type of odontogenic tumors and generally they are asymptomatic. This paper describes three cases of compound odontomas diagnosed in children due to dislodgement or over-retention of primary anterior teeth and/or swelling of the cortical bone. In all cases, the surgical excision of the lesions was performed and, in one case, orthodontic treatment was adopted in order to move an impacted permanent tooth to its normal position. The results achieved indicate that the early diagnosis of odontomas allows the adoption of a less complex and expensive treatment and ensures better prognosis.
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10/157. Radiographic evaluation of malignant fibrous histiocytoma affecting maxillary alveolar bone: a report of 2 cases.

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic findings of malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) and to discuss the contribution of these findings to a differentiation of MFH from other malignant tumors of the head and neck. STUDY DESIGN: Two cases of MFH of the maxillary sinus affecting the alveolar bone were evaluated radiographically and scintigraphically. RESULTS: We reported the following findings, which have only seldom been described: the presence of fairly well-demarcated bone destruction in the intraoral radiograph; the relatively smooth surface, uniform density, or no necrotic area of the tumor; in computed tomograph images showing the clear separation of the tumor from surrounding soft tissues; bone scintigraphs reflecting the periosteal reaction to tumor invasion; and lymphoscintigraphy of the metastatic lymph nodes. CONCLUSION: We evaluated the radiographic findings from 2 cases of MFH and describe findings that may aid in the differentiation of MFH. These radiographic features may help dentists differentiate MFH from other malignant tumors in the head and neck, although MFH is a rare disease and there are no radiographic findings that would indicate a specific diagnosis of MFH.
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ranking = 7
keywords = bone
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